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BSc or MPhy? watch

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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    My advice is go for the MPhys, its' a better degree, if the going gets tough you can drop down to the BSc.
    the first two years should be practically identical.
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    i don't think you necessarily need an mphys for phd in physics, i've seen people doing it recently without it. but it helps to have it for funding reasons and to get some research experience if you haven't had any
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    So... It's better to go for the MPhys?
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    You don't have that problem at Cambridge. They give you a BA and a MSci after 4 years of physics. They also give out an MA 3 years after you graduate (for staying alive!).
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    (Original post by steerpike1985)
    Sorry didn't read your question properly. the MPhy is a 4 year course as opposed to the three year course that a BSc is. If you want to specifically use Physics in your career - such as going into research, then I would recommend going for an MPhy

    Depends what you mean by research. If you want to go into industry, then an MPhys is great. If you want to go into accademic research then the traditional post-graduate masters is your best bet, unless you say go straight from BSc to PhD/D.Phil.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    Wrong, most of the top research institutions in the UK are now requiring undergraduate or postgraduate masters in order to a PhD in the physical sciences. My advice is go for the MPhys, its' a better degree, if the going gets tough you can drop down to the BSc.

    Wrong! Most top research institutions do not! Also if you want to do a PhD/D.Phil after a master qualification, a post-graduate masters carries more weight than an undergrad masters.

    MPhys/MChem etc are fab if you want to go off into industry - in fact that is what they were designed for - giving you the edge over a BSc candidate. For academia, however, things are still entrenched in the good old post-grad system.
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    (Original post by Princess Ana)
    So... It's better to go for the MPhys?
    paperwork wise it's better to apply for an MPhys and then drop down if you want to (or offer to drop down to the BSc if you don't get the offers/grades). Money wise it's easier to drop down than to switch up so if in doubt always apply for a longer course with the option to change to a shorter one.
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    Wrong! Most top research institutions do not! Also if you want to do a PhD/D.Phil after a master qualification, a post-graduate masters carries more weight than an undergrad masters.
    In Chemistry the following institutions currently require MChem at 2:1 or above (or postgraduate qualification) for entry into PhD programmes:

    UCL, Imperial, Oxford, Cambridge, St Andrews, Nottingham, Durham, Bristol, Glasgow and Edinburgh (ones I am aware of)

    For Chemistry, these are most of the top research institutions.

    MPhys/MChem etc are fab if you want to go off into industry - in fact that is what they were designed for - giving you the edge over a BSc candidate. For academia, however, things are still entrenched in the good old post-grad system.
    Whilst I agree that an MSc is going to give you better research experience it does not give you as higher level of learning as the undergrad masters, it is also much more difficult to get funding (and a supervisor) for an MSc in the Physical sciences.

    MChem/MPhys was not created to give candidates an edge in industry. It was created at the behest of the learned societies (RSC and InstP in this case) as their members felt that the BSc no longer provided adequate training to continue in research for a PhD - they were specifically designed to become the standard level required to enter PhD programmes in the Physical sciences (which has been realised). Obviously the Bologna accord will render this pathway redundant and all master's degrees (which will still be the baseline requirement to enter PhD programmes) will then be taken after graduation from a batchelors (in a 3 + 2 system) so as to be in-line with the rest of Europe, there has been much grumbling in academia about this change.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    In Chemistry the following institutions currently require MChem at 2:1 or above (or postgraduate qualification) for entry into PhD programmes:

    UCL, Imperial, Oxford, Cambridge, St Andrews, Nottingham, Durham, Bristol, Glasgow and Edinburgh (ones I am aware of)

    For Chemistry, these are most of the top research institutions.
    Oxford DEFINITELY do not require a maters as an absolute for Chem!
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    For those interested int he history of the MChem and it's first 10 years:

    http://www.chemsoc.org/networks/learnnet/mchem.htm

    Will see if I can get hard copies tomorrow as I'm out at Burlington House.
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    Oxford DEFINITELY do not require a maters as an absolute for Chem!
    Really? That's at odds with what I've been told (by Oxford academic staff). Of course oxford grads are allowed in without a masters, but outside grads are required to have MChem so I have been informed.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    Really? That's at odds with what I've been told (by Oxford academic staff). Of course oxford grads are allowed in without a masters, but outside grads are required to have MChem so I have been informed.

    I know plenty of D.Phil Chemists. Only one I know did a masters, and that was because he has a 2.2 (mitigating circumstances), and Oxford wanted a demonstration that he could cope with a D.Phil.
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    I know plenty of D.Phil Chemists. Only one I know did a masters, and that was because he has a 2.2 (mitigating circumstances), and Oxford wanted a demonstration that he could cope with a D.Phil.
    Ones that started to study for their DPhil this year just gone? That's when most of the universities I have listed reportedly changed their entrance requirements.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    Ones that started to study for their DPhil this year just gone? That's when most of the universities I have listed reportedly changed their entrance requirements.
    Phil started in October 2003, so I guess. He came from Nottingham - put off from staying there 'cos he had to do a masters. All the others started from 1999 through to 2002.

    I was my Colleges Common Room president for 2 years so got to know a lot of people and their backgrounds.
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    Phil started in October 2003, so I guess. He came from Nottingham - put off from staying there 'cos he had to do a masters. All the others started from 1999 through to 2002.
    Phil doing a DPhil?!

    sorry...
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    (Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
    Phil doing a DPhil?!

    sorry...
    LMAO! He'll be Dr Phil, D.Phil
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    Are there actually any postgrad masters physics courses? :confused:
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    (Original post by shiny)
    Are there actually any postgrad masters physics courses? :confused:
    I guess so, you can do imaging masters etc. You can also do radiation and dosimetry masters...
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    Phil started in October 2003, so I guess. He came from Nottingham - put off from staying there 'cos he had to do a masters. All the others started from 1999 through to 2002.

    I was my Colleges Common Room president for 2 years so got to know a lot of people and their backgrounds.
    Mmm, someone's been telling me porkies then. I'm still pretty confident about Notts, UCL, Imperial and the scottish unis wanting MChems to start PhDs. So if you don't have one, you'd miss out on those institutions at least - which is a significant shortening of your options. Your friend Phil demonstrates this I guess.

    From my experience of the MChem I would say it was definately worthwhile. Most of the advanced subjects you learn have much more relevance to the realities of research than the standard degree programme and the more involved research project gave me a much greater insight into what research was about. The smart money is on the MChem anyway as no-one is going to think worse of you for doing it.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    The smart money is on the MChem anyway as no-one is going to think worse of you for doing it.
    Including your bank manager who will be rubbing his/her hands in glee as your overdraft/borrowing goes up for yet another year
 
 
 
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