hcaushi
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Hi all,
Having decided to take a break from the technical subjects I enjoy, I thought it may be a good idea to post the strategy my school taught me for English Literature. The basic form of the essay paragraph is usable in any literature question, and it simply needs to be repeated in a fluent manner. It is, of course, the PEA Paragraph (or PEA Burger).

For the record, this is for AQA English Literature, but I am sure this will work for other exam boards, too!

The primary structure of it is as follows:
  • The Point: Make a point. Be as straight into the point as possible, with no need for anything vaguely written or that's not relevant to the question. This should take up roughly a quarter of a given paragraph. However, try not to extend this too far as it will eat into your time in the exam. You can always continue in a later section or paragraph.
  • The Evidence: Provide a quote. Try to remember as many useful ones as possible, preferably with alternate interpretations. Especially for Paper 2 (modern literature and poetry), this is highly recommended, at least twice.
  • The Analysis: Analyse the quote, first of all. Identify either a language or a structural technique (from exactly the same way you would do it in English Language Paper 1). Why was it used? What effect will it have on the reader? What does this mean with regards to context? What does this mean with regards to the rest of the play/novel? In short:

Language Technique
Effect on Reader
Link to Play/Novel
Contextual Link

To continue from one PEA paragraph to the next, all you need to do is begin the latter in a coherent way (such as "However, so-and-so could also be perceived to be..."). Ideally, a 30-mark (or similar) question merits three PEA paragraphs. If you aren't able to conclude your essay in your third paragraph, feel free to make a fourth, much shorter paragraph to conclude, although I wouldn't recommend doing a separate one as it feels... isolated from the rest of the essay.

So yeah, that's what I do in a nutshell. I'm sure most of you do something similar to this already, but I thought for those of you who didn't, or needed elaboration, this would help give an idea on how to have a good idea on how to tell what stage of writing you should be at by any given point.
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jMailei
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Report 2 months ago
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(Original post by hcaushi)
Hi all,
Having decided to take a break from the technical subjects I enjoy, I thought it may be a good idea to post the strategy my school taught me for English Literature. The basic form of the essay paragraph is usable in any literature question, and it simply needs to be repeated in a fluent manner. It is, of course, the PEA Paragraph (or PEA Burger).

For the record, this is for AQA English Literature, but I am sure this will work for other exam boards, too!

The primary structure of it is as follows:
  • The Point: Make a point. Be as straight into the point as possible, with no need for anything vaguely written or that's not relevant to the question. This should take up roughly a quarter of a given paragraph. However, try not to extend this too far as it will eat into your time in the exam. You can always continue in a later section or paragraph.
  • The Evidence: Provide a quote. Try to remember as many useful ones as possible, preferably with alternate interpretations. Especially for Paper 2 (modern literature and poetry), this is highly recommended, at least twice.
  • The Analysis: Analyse the quote, first of all. Identify either a language or a structural technique (from exactly the same way you would do it in English Language Paper 1). Why was it used? What effect will it have on the reader? What does this mean with regards to context? What does this mean with regards to the rest of the play/novel? In short:

Language Technique
Effect on Reader
Link to Play/Novel
Contextual Link

To continue from one PEA paragraph to the next, all you need to do is begin the latter in a coherent way (such as "However, so-and-so could also be perceived to be..."). Ideally, a 30-mark (or similar) question merits three PEA paragraphs. If you aren't able to conclude your essay in your third paragraph, feel free to make a fourth, much shorter paragraph to conclude, although I wouldn't recommend doing a separate one as it feels... isolated from the rest of the essay.

So yeah, that's what I do in a nutshell. I'm sure most of you do something similar to this already, but I thought for those of you who didn't, or needed elaboration, this would help give an idea on how to have a good idea on how to tell what stage of writing you should be at by any given point.
Thank you so much for this. If it’s alright, please could you share tips on how to do the introduction of the PEA?
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