Poll: Should this bill be passed into law?
As many of the opinion, Aye (18)
36.73%
On the contrary, No (19)
38.78%
Abstain (12)
24.49%
This discussion is closed.
adam9317
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#1
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#1
Drug Decriminalisation Bill 2017, TSR Government







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Drug Decriminalisation Bill 2017
An Act to legalise drug possession and make drug users safer









BE IT ENACTED by the Queen’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows:—

1: Definitions
The following definitions are used in this Act:

(1) A 'drug' is any substance listed in section 2, Misuse of Drugs Act 1971.
(2) A drug's 'class' relates to its classification in the same.
(3) A 'registered individual' is a person registered with the National Narcotic Service.

2: Removal of criminal offence of possession
Section 5 of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 is repealed.

3: Establishment of National Narcotic Service
A public body named the National Narcotic Service (NNS), charged with the establishment of centres for drug education, health, and supply shall be established.

4: Supply of drugs
(1) The NNS shall be the sole supplier of drugs.
(2) The NNS shall devise a system for the supply of drugs such that the supply division makes a return on operating capital of not less than 15% per annum.
(3) Supply and distribution shall be done through National Narcotic Centres (NNCs).
(4) Only registered individuals may purchase from NNCs.
(5) The process for registration shall be designed by the NNS, but shall involve a cooling-off period of not less than fourteen (14) days before drugs may be purchased.
(6) The NNS shall set guidelines regarding quantities of drugs which are fit for human consumption (within the context of drug use).
(1) (a) Individuals may not purchase more than the relevant quantity of any drug in any given seven-day period.
(1) (b) Each individual purchase must include a period of at least an hour between placing the order and receiving, and both the order and delivery must be done in person at an NNC.

5: Education
(1) The NNS shall offer free drug education and advice.
(2) Upon a registered individual requesting education or advice, if they miss an appointment for said education/advice, they shall be barred from purchasing drugs until they attend an appointment.

6: Health
(1) The NNS shall take over the responsibility for long-term drug rehabilitation programs.
(2) Long-term drug rehabilitation programs shall be voluntary to enter into, but once commenced upon, shall be binding on the person in question, including as regards the extent to which they may purchase drugs from NNCs.
(3) The National Health Service shall retain responsibility for treating overdose, as well as injury and disease caused by drug use.

7: Adjusted penalties
Penalties for breach of the provisions of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 shall be as follows, with Schedule 4 thereof amended accordingly:
(1) Penalties for breach of section 4 (supply, possession with intent to supply) by class and by volume shall henceforth be as follows:
(1) (a) Class A:
(1) (a) (i) Quantities indicative of large commercial operation: Mandatory life sentence with discretion to make whole-life order, fine of up to £10,000,000.
(1) (a) (ii) Quantities indicative of small commercial operation: Minimum 20-year sentence with discretion to increase up to life with whole-life order, fine of up to £1,000,000.
(1) (a) (iii) Quantities indicative of casual supply to friends, especially not at a profit: Minimum 5-year sentence with discretion to increase up to 20 years, fine of up to £100,000.
(1) (b) Class B:
(1) (b) (i) Quantities indicative of large commercial operation: Minimum 20-year sentence with discretion to increase up to life with whole-life order, fine of up to £1,000,000.
(1) (a) (ii) Quantities indicative of small commercial operation: Minimum 5-year sentence with discretion to increase up to life with whole-life order, fine of up to £100,000.
(1) (a) (iii) Quantities indicative of casual supply to friends, especially not at a profit: no mandatory prison sentence, but discretion to sentence up to 20 years, fine of up to £10,000.
(1) (c) Class C:
(1) (b) (i) Quantities indicative of large commercial operation: Minimum 5-year sentence with discretion to increase up to life with whole-life order, fine of up to £100,000.
(1) (a) (ii) Quantities indicative of small commercial operation: no mandatory prison sentence, but discretion to sentence up to 20 years, fine of up to £10,000.
(1) (a) (iii) Quantities indicative of casual supply to friends, especially not at a profit: no mandatory prison sentence, but discretion to sentence up to 12 months, fine of up to £1,000.
(2) The penalty for breach of section 6 (cultivation of cannabis plant) shall henceforth be a maximum 10-year sentence (no minimum), with a fine of up to £5,000,000.
(3) Where a breach of the offences referred to in subsection (1) above relates to drugs which do not form part of the official supply, or which have been altered from official supply, it shall be considered as increasing the tier of the offence by one (either increasing the severity of the nature of supply, or the class of the drug).

8: Repeal of V1025
V1025 (Hallucinogens Research Act 2016) is repealed.

9: Commencement, Short Title and Extent
(1) This Act may be cited as the Drug Decriminalisation Act 2017;
(2) This Act shall extend to the United Kingdom; and
(3) Shall come into force on the 1st January 2018.


Notes

Spoiler:
Show










This aims to do a number of things. Most importantly, it aims to create a safer, regulated environment for the use of illegal drugs. A hardline 'war on drugs' has failed, and so we must accept that people will use drugs, and look to make that safe for them to do. Exposure to private sector dealers leads to people being deliberately moved on to harder drugs (addiction being good for the dealer), drugs being 'cut' with cheaper, but more dangerous products, and people being able to buy quantities which are almost certain to kill them. Moving the taking of drugs into a safer, controlled environment will limit drug deaths and death caused by drugs.

Furthermore, this should cause a reduction in the crime surrounding drugs, as much of that is to do with 'turf wars' and the pursuit of profit. An enforced monopoly of the state is the best way to prevent that. This monopoly is backed up by making it much harder for the black market to operate: setting profit targets at much lower than private dealers means that they will be squeezed out of the market, and the greater penalties (s7) create a powerful disincentive to begin dealing.

Finally, by moving information and support for drugs into the same location as supply, one can help drug users stick to rehabilitation programs, as well as creating an area with more specialist expertise than the NHS.












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Jammy Duel
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#2
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This is the complete wrong direction, the war on drugs has not been hardline, it has been a war fought on the wrong front, the supply front. It is clear that the war on drugs treated as a demand side issue is effective in reducing consumption, countries with zero tolerance policies all have significantly lower usage of everything from weed to heroin. It's also odd that you're declaring the war on drugs a failure, and then go on to ramp up the penalties.

I would also question if there is any understanding of the concept of working capital, a return of 15% of WC could be a loss, could be small profits, could be large profits (with everybody going back to their old dealers).

This doesn't solve the problem for the worst of drugs as I doubt the NNS would are going to be dispensing large enough volumes for the addicts who are going to stick with their old dealers
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3121
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#3
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#3
As far as I'm aware the only common illegal drug is marijuana. Has this house legalised it? If not that should be the starting point
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Jammy Duel
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#4
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(Original post by zayn008)
As far as I'm aware the only common illegal drug is marijuana. Has this house legalised it? If not that should be the starting point
Ages ago, now the government has moved on to things that cause clear and well established harm, ironic given I suspect they support trying to stop people smoking and I imagine many would support an outright ban if consumption became sufficiently low
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LifeIsFine
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#5
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adam9317
PetrosAC
Can my vote be changed from an Aye to an abstain please?
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PetrosAC
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#6
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(Original post by LifeIsFine)
adam9317
PetrosAC
Can my vote be changed from an Aye to an abstain please?
One vote has been changed from an Aye to an Abstain
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3121
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#7
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(Original post by Jammy Duel)
Ages ago, now the government has moved on to things that cause clear and well established harm, ironic given I suspect they support trying to stop people smoking and I imagine many would support an outright ban if consumption became sufficiently low
Oh thanks, I wasn't aware..

I agree. Criminals would most likely increase their activities for other ways to make money such as through human trafficking and counterfeiting. Its also unclear as to where the government plans to purchase its supply from
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Jammy Duel
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#8
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#8
(Original post by zayn008)
Oh thanks, I wasn't aware..

I agree. Criminals would most likely increase their activities for other ways to make money such as through human trafficking and counterfeiting. Its also unclear as to where the government plans to purchase its supply from
They wouldn't need to change their activities unless the government is going to go so far as to fully fuel addiction. An addict who is already breaking the law to fuel their addiction isn't going to stop just because their probably more expensive government gear has run out and they aren't allowed more yet.

I know people with histories with class A drugs, they don't start because it's illegal, like people claim teens smoking weed do, decriminalising doesn't remove the pre addiction attraction.

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Airmed
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#9
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Why does it say 2016 in the bill title? :holmes:
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RayApparently
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#10
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#10
(Original post by Airmed)
Why does it say 2016 in the bill title? :holmes:
adam9317 I did say.
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Airmed
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#11
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(Original post by RayApparently)
adam9317 I did say.
Adam being Adam, right up to the end :rofl:
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adam9317
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#12
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#12
(Original post by Airmed)
Adam being Adam, right up to the end :rofl:
I can't change now, that would just be wrong
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RayApparently
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#13
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(Original post by adam9317)
I can't change now, that would just be wrong
:laugh:
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Airmed
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#14
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#14
(Original post by adam9317)
I can't change now, that would just be wrong
I wouldn't expect anything less :rofl:
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Jammy Duel
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#15
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#15
The abstentions are strong here.
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Unown Uzer
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#16
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#16
We should be doing what President Duterte does to end the drug problem in the UK.
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username2808800
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#17
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#17
(Original post by Jammy Duel)
The abstentions are strong here.
multiple members of the government have abstained including one of the top 4:laugh:
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username1751857
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#18
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#18
PetrosAC cranbrook_aspie can you please change my vote from an 'Abstain' to a 'Nay' please?
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PetrosAC
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#19
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#19
(Original post by CoffeeGeek)
PetrosAC cranbrook_aspie can you please change my vote from an 'Abstain' to a 'Nay' please?
One Vote has been changed from Abstain to Nay
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LifeIsFine
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#20
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#20
Closest bill this term?
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