Ratios into fractions????? Watch

Bertybassett
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i'm a GCSE student and I'm really confused about changing ratios into fractions. I used to think that to express a ratio as a fraction you added the two numbers up for the denominator and then had 'either of the numbers' as the numerator. e.g. if the number of boys to girls was 2:3 surely 2/5 are boys and 3/5 are girls. but then I watched this video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H9_3ChJ8yzM

and I just don't get it. please help!!!!!
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t
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(Original post by Bertybassett)
i'm a GCSE student and I'm really confused about changing ratios into fractions. I used to think that to express a ratio as a fraction you added the two numbers up for the denominator and then had 'either of the numbers' as the numerator. e.g. if the number of boys to girls was 2:3 surely 2/5 are boys and 3/5 are girls. but then I watched this video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H9_3ChJ8yzM

and I just don't get it. please help!!!!!
You are correct, when you want to compare the numbers of each student, you separate the ratio and you can say that out of 5 people there are 2 boys and 3 girls. However what that video is trying to explain is the proportion of boys compared to girls. Think about it this way, when usually calculating proportions you would divide one variable by the other right? Essentially the same ratio 2:3 is written in fractional form - since dividing 2/5 by 3/5, gets you 2/3!
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Bertybassett
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(Original post by I <3 WORK)
You are correct, when you want to compare the numbers of each student, you separate the ratio and you can say that out of 5 people there are 2 boys and 3 girls. However what that video is trying to explain is the proportion of boys compared to girls. Think about it this way, when usually calculating proportions you would divide one variable by the other right? Essentially the same ratio 2:3 is written in fractional form - since dividing 2/5 by 3/5, gets you 2/3!
thanks for the help. so would i be right in saying there is 3/2 times as many girls as boys?
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Tarick
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(Original post by Bertybassett)
thanks for the help. so would i be right in saying there is 3/2 times as many girls as boys?
yes
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(Original post by Bertybassett)
thanks for the help. so would i be right in saying there is 3/2 times as many girls as boys?
That's perfectly correct - and that's why you can even write the ratio as 3:2 if you're comparing girls to boys.
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