There is a real chance of a peaceful united Ireland now Watch

SaucissonSecCy
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#1
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Unionists seem to be hanging on by the tenuous thread of Scotland remaining in the UK. I see no future for their cause if Scotland leaves. Even if they do, London simply doesn't care about them. Priorities are converging and England is in many ways a post-imperially deluded, with a seeming death wish towards it's own civilization.

If the Northern Irish have sense, they will leave behind the narcissism of small differences, not be beholden to British divide and rule, and save themselves from a Britain being destroyed that doesn't care about them.
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SaucissonSecCy
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Scotland should declare independence for similar reasons. Contempt from Westminster, and civilizational by England. End finally the deluded imperial rump, so that England can finally look forwards not back.
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username1221160
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The majority of the population in Northern Ireland will object to a united Ireland.
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l'etranger
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Except England is more wealthy than Scotland and Northern Ireland both of whom are holding us back and even though Sinn Fein is obsessed with English people in particular, most of the people who oppressed Irish Catholics were Scots-Protestants.
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jumpingjesusholycow
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As of 1973, 98.9% of the Northern Irish electorate stood with the United Kingdom.

Unless they've vanished off the face of the earth, I'd say you're talking absolute nonsense.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northe...rder_poll_1973
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Good bloke
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(Original post by SaucissonSecCy)
End finally the deluded imperial rump, so that England can finally look forwards not back.
Hmm. It was England's rescue of Scotland from the catastrophe of its own imperial ambitions that brought the United Kingdom together.
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JamesN88
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(Original post by jumpingjesusholycow)
As of 1973, 98.9% of the Northern Irish electorate stood with the United Kingdom.

Unless they've vanished off the face of the earth, I'd say you're talking absolute nonsense.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northe...rder_poll_1973
Did you read that piece before you linked it? The vote was boycotted by the Republicans.
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SaucissonSecCy
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(Original post by Good bloke)
Hmm. It was England's rescue of Scotland from the catastrophe of its own imperial ambitions that brought the United Kingdom together.
I know about that, but it doesn't pertain to the situation now.
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SaucissonSecCy
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(Original post by jumpingjesusholycow)
As of 1973, 98.9% of the Northern Irish electorate stood with the United Kingdom.

Unless they've vanished off the face of the earth, I'd say you're talking absolute nonsense.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northe...rder_poll_1973
1973!!!

You sound like all these establishment 'poll citers'.

Public opinion is very different now, we are in revolutionary times.
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Good bloke
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(Original post by SaucissonSecCy)
I know about that, but it doesn't pertain to the situation now.
The truth about any united Ireland that might be brought about in the next generation will be that the country will have a major organised and armed crime problem caused by killers from both sides of the sectarian divide having too much time and too many guns on their hands, in combination with too few jobs and widespread resentment of the country's biggest trading partner and source of wealth. Sort that lot out!
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l'etranger
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(Original post by Good bloke)
Hmm. It was England's rescue of Scotland from the catastrophe of its own imperial ambitions that brought the United Kingdom together.
>tfw scotland can't even colonise panama

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Good bloke
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(Original post by SaucissonSecCy)
Public opinion is very different now, we are in revolutionary times.
What you may have forgotten is that any poll will be carried out across the whole island, with the voters in both countries independently having to vote in favour of unity. Have you considered that the Irish might not want to have the Irish join them?
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Josb
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(Original post by JamesN88)
Did you read that piece before you linked it? The vote was boycotted by the Republicans.
It still got the majority of registered voters. Even if all the Republicans had voted for the United Ireland they would still have lost.
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Doones
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I think the assumption that a move to a united Ireland would be peaceful may be misplaced, unfortunately.

People have long memories on the island of Ireland and some might look back at 28 September 1912, the signing of the Ulster Covenant, which later led to 100,000 forming the UVF. The coincidental outbreak of WW1 prevented a then likely civil war in Ireland, but the partition in 1921 was a reflection of the strength of Unionist feeling indicated by the "Covenant".
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ScottishBrexitor
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It's not happening. No Scottish independence nor a United Ireland no matter how much people want it. Deal with it and move on.
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JamesN88
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(Original post by Josb)
It still got the majority of registered voters. Even if all the Republicans had voted for the United Ireland they would still have lost.
I know that, but they were claiming that 98% of the electorate chose to stay in the UK which is BS. There's been a big demographic shift since then as well in favour of the Catholic population.

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/polit...ians-1.2190041

Personally I think joint sovereignty is the best way to go, otherwise it may just create the same problems in reverse.
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Good bloke
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
People have long memories on the island of Ireland
That is an understatement. The unionist protestants want to remember the late seventeenth century, the die-hard nationalists won't forgive or forget the potato famine, and none of them will forget the 1920s.
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Doones
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(Original post by Good bloke)
What you may have forgotten is that any poll will be carried out across the whole island, with the voters in both countries independently having to vote in favour of unity. Have you considered that the Irish might not want to have the Irish join them?
The majority in the Republic want a united Ireland "in their lifetime" - although not so many in the short term...

http://www.thejournal.ie/prime-time-...26738-Nov2015/
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Good bloke
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
The majority in the Republic want a united Ireland "in their lifetime" - although not so many in the short term..
That is a bit like St Augustine's famous prayer, Grant me chastity and continence, Lord, but not yet.
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Doones
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(Original post by Good bloke)
the die-hard nationalists won't forgive or forget the potato famine
Or the Ulster Plantation. Or Cromwell. Or the Normans.

And don't mention the Vikings... :viking:
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