Are independent schools worth the money?

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Anonymous1502
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#1
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#1
I know some people who send their children to independent schools they are not insanely rich or anything I assume they spend the majority of their salaries to send their children to independent schools they live very modest lives.I know someone who send 3 children at once to independent schools it seems that the families i know who send their children to independent schools spend the majority of their salaries to send their children there.Do you think it is worth the money?What is your opinion?
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squeakysquirrel
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(Original post by Anonymous1502)
I know some people who send their children to independent schools they are not insanely rich or anything I assume they spend the majority of their salaries to send their children to independent schools they live very modest lives.I know someone who send 3 children at once to independent schools it seems that the families i know who send their children to independent schools spend the majority of their salaries to send their children there.Do you think it is worth the money?What is your opinion?
Definitely not all are worth the money.

If you have a lazy child, they may get more out academically because of smaller class sizes.

Places loke Tonbridge, Eton, Wellington are worth the money because they have the right sort of pupil - the ones whose parents want them to do well.

DO you remember the story recently of the lorry driver who sent his kid to private school and he came out with 1 GCSE and he wants to sue the school - deffo not worth it.
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Anonymous1502
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(Original post by squeakysquirrel)
Definitely not all are worth the money.

If you have a lazy child, they may get more out academically because of smaller class sizes.

Places loke Tonbridge, Eton, Wellington are worth the money because they have the right sort of pupil - the ones whose parents want them to do well.

DO you remember the story recently of the lorry driver who sent his kid to private school and he came out with 1 GCSE and he wants to sue the school - deffo not worth it.
I do remember reading this article about that lorry driver in the middle east who sent his child to a private school and the kid failed his gcse's.I do also think,it depends on the independent school you send them to,if its one with really really good results like eton and westminster and st pauls, then i think tis worth the money but if its one with mediocre results,similar to comprehensive schools then i dont think its worth it.
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S.G.
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For me I think it depends on the work ethic of the child and the attitude of the parent towards their child's education. If the child works hard enough, and there are plenty of resources to help, he will succeed. Similarly, I think it will also help the child if the parent takes an interest in their child's education.

I would say the only bad thing about going to a comprehensive school is your surroundings. Most people don't want to learn (so disrupt class etc) and this makes you not want to learn if the teacher is just shouting at other kids for half the lesson. It's all about the environment for me. Which is also why I hate mixed ability classes
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supalape
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Let me share my experience of going to a (very bad) public school for Years 7 - 11 and now going to a top independent school. Although people argue that going to a independent school "guarantees" you better exam results, this is not true. I was able to achieve 6A*s/2As at a failing comprehensive school, however I had to self-teach about half of my subjects and had little to no support from my school (they even denied us study leave.)

What I've noticed from attending an independent school for Year 12 so far is that you're paying for huge amounts of support and (in general) excellent teaching standards, for example 2/3 of my maths teachers went to Oxbridge whereas in my old school my maths teacher had a "half" science degree from a random Australian university. On a pastoral level any issues/concerns you have are dealt with pretty much immediately and academic support is totally tailored to each individual's aspirations and potential. This is something you wouldn't find in most comprehensive public schools.

So yes, while I think people often make assumptions about going to private school such as everyone being high-achieving Oxbridge candidates (this is definitely not the case, there are many stupid people in my school lol) there is evidence to support the argument that independent schools are worth the money. At least from my own experience, I'd never go to a public school again. Hope this helped! I also apologise for my English, English isn't my first language :/
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honestly
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#6
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#6
(Original post by squeakysquirrel)
Definitely not all are worth the money.

If you have a lazy child, they may get more out academically because of smaller class sizes.

Places loke Tonbridge, Eton, Wellington are worth the money because they have the right sort of pupil - the ones whose parents want them to do well.

DO you remember the story recently of the lorry driver who sent his kid to private school and he came out with 1 GCSE and he wants to sue the school - deffo not worth it.
hahahahahahahahahah G-d forgive me! that made me laugh so hard! not even 3 Cs or something lol hahaha
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squeakysquirrel
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#7
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(Original post by timster32)
Replace Wellington with Harrow, Wellington only care about rugby and do awful academically...
Wellington actually do rather well these days - my son used to teach there so I do know
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Anonymous1502
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#8
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(Original post by supalape)
Let me share my experience of going to a (very bad) public school for Years 7 - 11 and now going to a top independent school. Although people argue that going to a independent school "guarantees" you better exam results, this is not true. I was able to achieve 6A*s/2As at a failing comprehensive school, however I had to self-teach about half of my subjects and had little to no support from my school (they even denied us study leave.)

What I've noticed from attending an independent school for Year 12 so far is that you're paying for huge amounts of support and (in general) excellent teaching standards, for example 2/3 of my maths teachers went to Oxbridge whereas in my old school my maths teacher had a "half" science degree from a random Australian university. On a pastoral level any issues/concerns you have are dealt with pretty much immediately and academic support is totally tailored to each individual's aspirations and potential. This is something you wouldn't find in most comprehensive public schools.

So yes, while I think people often make assumptions about going to private school such as everyone being high-achieving Oxbridge candidates (this is definitely not the case, there are many stupid people in my school lol) there is evidence to support the argument that independent schools are worth the money. At least from my own experience, I'd never go to a public school again. Hope this helped! I also apologise for my English, English isn't my first language :/
Perhaps the reason the children in many independent schools do well is because they want to do well as they parents pay a lot of money for their education while many people in comprehensives do not care and are happy to leave with c's.The surroundings are probably better at top independent schools as it is nice to be surrounded by like minded people not bafoons.
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mojojojo101
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#9
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You need to remember that at places like Eton, Harrow, ttc, the top level of independant schools, you aren't paying just for an education, you are also paying for access to a certain section of society, who, all things going to plan, will end up rich and influential at which point you can monetise the connections you made at school.

For the most part I don't believe that independent schools are worth the money, not unless you can wrangle significant amounts of bursaries.
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username2281157
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#10
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Good ones are definitely worth it. I don't go to one, but from what I hear about the one in my area (where most ppl come out with plenty of A*s) the standard of education and support you get is miles ahead
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Anonymous1502
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#11
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#11
(Original post by HamzahPatel)
Good ones are definitely worth it. I don't go to one, but from what I hear about the one in my area (where most ppl come out with plenty of A*s) the standard of education and support you get is miles ahead
Do you think the school gets you the A*'s or the work you put youself gets you the A*'s.Good teaching does help but initiative also is very important because if you do not use your initiative to sudy go over things do past papers you probably would not do well.Also the types of people who goto eaton and a local comprehensive does differ probably as there are entry exams for top schools unlike your local comprehensive.
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username2281157
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(Original post by Anonymous1502)
Do you think the school gets you the A*'s or the work you put youself gets you the A*'s.Good teaching does help but initiative also is very important because if you do not use your initiative to sudy go over things do past papers you probably would not do well.Also the types of people who goto eaton and a local comprehensive does differ probably as there are entry exams for top schools unlike your local comprehensive.
I think the school does in effect get you the A*s, by making you into the type of person to take the initiative in your studies and put in the work. You're right about entry exams meaning that the people going there are already smart, but then compare it to their state equivalent - grammar schools. I go to one and it's an overrated piece of sh*t that only gets its good results because of that reason (along with pushy asian parents). At GCSE I had to self-study half of my subjects last minute. Arguably it’s my fault for being completely unproductive from yr 7-10, but my school’s teaching and support (or lack of) hardly made me want to. And the thing is GCSE’s are piss easy, imagine the A*s I would have got if I was actually made to apply myself. State schools with their limited resources (and particularly low expectations in non-selective ones) don't push you to do your best. That’s where good privates are different.
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Like_A_G6
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The problem is is that to do well in a failing state school you have to work hard outside of school and self teach a lot of the syllabus. This basically means your time outside of school is spent doing what you should have done in school so you have no time to socialise or learn other important life skills. Even though you would do well academically, other skills (like interpersonal and communicational skills) are compromised. This will come to hurt your career prospects in the future. Most people who are smart, confident, and communicate effectively would have gone to an independent school.

In the above scenario, the independent school is completely worth it. Compared to a grammar school though, it's a bit of a rip off.
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Babyoleg
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It's not worth it - they end up at the same unis doing the same degree. I go to an academy and there's people with places at oxford and Cambridge
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CraigBackner
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#15
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#15
(Original post by Like_A_G6)
The problem is is that to do well in a failing state school you have to work hard outside of school and self teach a lot of the syllabus. This basically means your time outside of school is spent doing what you should have done in school so you have no time to socialise or learn other important life skills. Even though you would do well academically, other skills (like interpersonal and communicational skills) are compromised. This will come to hurt your career prospects in the future. Most people who are smart, confident, and communicate effectively would have gone to an independent school.

In the above scenario, the independent school is completely worth it. Compared to a grammar school though, it's a bit of a rip off.
hows it a rip off compared to grammar school? grammar schools are free
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Like_A_G6
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#16
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(Original post by CraigBackner)
hows it a rip off compared to grammar school? grammar schools are free
We're on the same page. Independent schools (ones you pay a lot for like Eton, Harrow, Rugby, etc.) are a rip off compared to Grammar schools.
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Badger Face
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#17
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For what you actually get for your money they are a little too expensive. However even with this in mind I would not put my own child through the state system,
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Almonti372
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(Original post by Anonymous1502)
I know some people who send their children to independent schools they are not insanely rich or anything I assume they spend the majority of their salaries to send their children to independent schools they live very modest lives.I know someone who send 3 children at once to independent schools it seems that the families i know who send their children to independent schools spend the majority of their salaries to send their children there.Do you think it is worth the money?What is your opinion?
Definitely worth it, provided you choose a good one. Private schools often give children that extra something, and there seems to be less social pressure when wearing the same clothes and new brands etc. Often also a greater range of subjects available, smaller class sizes and can have better sports facilities. Also many do IGCSE, which state schools are no longer going to be doing as the government has decided only GCSE results will count on the government league tables (not the small was the ones you read in the newspaper). Some independent schools are cheaper than others, price doesn't dictate quality. Highly recommend them!
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Almonti372
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#19
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#19
(Original post by SGHD26716)
For me I think it depends on the work ethic of the child and the attitude of the parent towards their child's education. If the child works hard enough, and there are plenty of resources to help, he will succeed. Similarly, I think it will also help the child if the parent takes an interest in their child's education.

I would say the only bad thing about going to a comprehensive school is your surroundings. Most people don't want to learn (so disrupt class etc) and this makes you not want to learn if the teacher is just shouting at other kids for half the lesson. It's all about the environment for me. Which is also why I hate mixed ability classes
Yeah totally agree
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Almonti372
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#20
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#20
(Original post by Anonymous1502)
I know some people who send their children to independent schools they are not insanely rich or anything I assume they spend the majority of their salaries to send their children to independent schools they live very modest lives.I know someone who send 3 children at once to independent schools it seems that the families i know who send their children to independent schools spend the majority of their salaries to send their children there.Do you think it is worth the money?What is your opinion?
Also often a good private school will push children that extra bit further to achieve their full potential, something which the overstretched teachers at state schools can't always do to their pupils. Often they are less disruptive, as class sizes are smaller and often put into sets. Children are encouraged to enjoy their learning and work hard.
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