I got till 2nd may for 4 test's can i do it?

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omgitsamrit
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Hi Everyone,
I got till 2nd may because my year 9 mocks are coming up which will be if i do higher of foundation for gcse papers for maths english and science.

I have 2 maths papers 1 calculator and 1 non calculator (Both higher)/// 1 English paper //And 1 foundation science paper

So the question is can i get good grades if i study hard and do i have enough time?
And best revision tips for all subjects thxxxx
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claireestelle
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(Original post by omgitsamrit)
Hi Everyone,
I got till 2nd may because my year 9 mocks are coming up which will be if i do higher of foundation for gcse papers for maths english and science.

I have 2 maths papers 1 calculator and 1 non calculator (Both higher)/// 1 English paper //And 1 foundation science paper

So the question is can i get good grades if i study hard and do i have enough time?
And best revision tips for all subjects thxxxx
A month is plenty of time For science i used to find flashcards very helpful
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Kamrun.Nagla
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I didn't revise for my year 9 tests at the end of the year and still did great, i do however think that it would be good practise for you to revise for your tests as it will aid in concentration when it comes to taking your actually GCSEs which for me are only a few weeks away. Well thats my advice do with it what you want.
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omgitsamrit
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(Original post by Kamrun.Nagla)
I didn't revise for my year 9 tests at the end of the year and still did great, i do however think that it would be good practise for you to revise for your tests as it will aid in concentration when it comes to taking your actually GCSEs which for me are only a few weeks away. Well thats my advice do with it what you want.
the thing is i am decent in class work but when it comes to a math test i get over 40% but no higher than 65ish and for science im just awful last test i got 17/60
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Popsiclez
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I don't think anyone took their Year 9 mocks seriously, apart from doing the minnimum required and sleeping.
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Popsiclez
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(Original post by omgitsamrit)
the thing is i am decent in class work but when it comes to a math test i get over 40% but no higher than 65ish and for science im just awful last test i got 17/60
For maths I think the bit that stops you from getting higher are the end pages because most of the time teachers only go over problem solving and first to mid page questions. But you should really concentrate on typical exam questions that come up near the end that you don't know how to answer at all as those are more targeted for higher grades.
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omgitsamrit
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(Original post by Popsiclez)
I don't think anyone took their Year 9 mocks seriously, apart from doing the minnimum required and sleeping.
no its because if i get 85% higher my mum said i can get a dog
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Popsiclez
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(Original post by omgitsamrit)
no its because if i get 85% higher my mum said i can get a dog
OMG I've always wanted a dog! 😢
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ecila21
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What you need to remember about year 9 mocks is that you're still two years away from your final exams so, especially in maths, no one expects you to get really high grades if you're doing the full papers. So revise (with four exams, you've got plenty of time) but don't get too stressed. Your teachers can change your tier closer to the exams in year 11 anyway.

As for revision strategies, with maths do lots of practise questions. I find the CGP books are good for questions so you can get used to the style. For science, I use cue cards with multiple questions on each so I can test myself. For English, do some reading around so you're used to different types of texts and revise different language techniques so you can spot them easily.
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omgitsamrit
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(Original post by ecila21)
What you need to remember about year 9 mocks is that you're still two years away from your final exams so, especially in maths, no one expects you to get really high grades if you're doing the full papers. So revise (with four exams, you've got plenty of time) but don't get too stressed. Your teachers can change your tier closer to the exams in year 11 anyway.

As for revision strategies, with maths do lots of practise questions. I find the CGP books are good for questions so you can get used to the style. For science, I use cue cards with multiple questions on each so I can test myself. For English, do some reading around so you're used to different types of texts and revise different language techniques so you can spot them easily.
Ok thank you and can i ask what do you mean cue cards and just normal cgp books or can you recommend any websites
thank you
Amrit
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ecila21
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(Original post by omgitsamrit)
Ok thank you and can i ask what do you mean cue cards and just normal cgp books or can you recommend any websites
thank you
Amrit
I bought a load of lined index cards from staples (but you could make your own out of paper at home as well) and then I'd take a topic and write questions on one side of the card and answers on the other. Some of the questions are quite simple like "Define ecosystem" or whatever while others involve a lot more effort such as "explain the process of genetic engineering to produce human insulin." Generally, I try to put as many questions on one card as possible to save paper as I use them to death and easily have hundreds, but that's just a personal choice. To revise from them, I'll read the question and try to answer it as best I can out loud then read the actual answer. Then I redo the set of cards either a few hours or a few days later to see if I've retained the knowledge. For me, it works really well as I can test myself to see how much I really know, rather than just reading and hoping for the best. This can be done individually (like I prefer) or in groups which is great too for many people

The workbooks for maths are really good. I have the questions book, the exam practice workbook and the level 9 book. The latter two are my favourites because the questions are styled like the exam questions. The revision guides are also very good if you need to check up on something, despite the cheesy puns everywhere. I have the maths, geography and history books.

I don't really use websites but BBC Bitesize is always pretty decent for a quick recap. For English literature, my teacher recommends Schmoop and Sparknotes, which I don't really get along with but you might find them handy.
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omgitsamrit
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(Original post by ecila21)
I bought a load of lined index cards from staples (but you could make your own out of paper at home as well) and then I'd take a topic and write questions on one side of the card and answers on the other. Some of the questions are quite simple like "Define ecosystem" or whatever while others involve a lot more effort such as "explain the process of genetic engineering to produce human insulin." Generally, I try to put as many questions on one card as possible to save paper as I use them to death and easily have hundreds, but that's just a personal choice. To revise from them, I'll read the question and try to answer it as best I can out loud then read the actual answer. Then I redo the set of cards either a few hours or a few days later to see if I've retained the knowledge. For me, it works really well as I can test myself to see how much I really know, rather than just reading and hoping for the best. This can be done individually (like I prefer) or in groups which is great too for many people

The workbooks for maths are really good. I have the questions book, the exam practice workbook and the level 9 book. The latter two are my favourites because the questions are styled like the exam questions. The revision guides are also very good if you need to check up on something, despite the cheesy puns everywhere. I have the maths, geography and history books.

I don't really use websites but BBC Bitesize is always pretty decent for a quick recap. For English literature, my teacher recommends Schmoop and Sparknotes, which I don't really get along with but you might find them handy.
Oh ok thanks for your help
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EmmaCx
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(Original post by omgitsamrit)
Hi Everyone,
I got till 2nd may because my year 9 mocks are coming up which will be if i do higher of foundation for gcse papers for maths english and science.

I have 2 maths papers 1 calculator and 1 non calculator (Both higher)/// 1 English paper //And 1 foundation science paper

So the question is can i get good grades if i study hard and do i have enough time?
And best revision tips for all subjects thxxxx
You can definitely get good grades if you put the effort in, and you do still have time to revise. Don't put it off any longer though, and don't think 'Oh I've left it too long, there's no point now'. You will still be able to improve your grades by revising.

A big issue that a lot of people have when doing exams is, they don't really know what the question is asking them. People can know the content off by heart, but if they don't know what the question wants, then they can be easily dropping marks. Take the time to understand the command words that will be used throughout your exam. AQA has a really useful resource for this - http://www.aqa.org.uk/student-suppor...g-the-question. This will be the same regardless what exam board you are using.

"Question keywords are also called 'command' words. These are the words in your exam questions that tell you what the examiner wants you to do. By understanding these command words, you are on your way to understanding your exam questions.
For example, you may be instructed in your exam question to 'describe' something within your answer. If your answer 'evaluates' rather than 'sets out the characteristics', you potentially haven't given the right answer."

I would definitely recommend doing at least 2 or 3 past papers for each subject, ideally even more than that. Past papers are great because they give you experience with answering the exam questions, how you should word your answers etc. When you are doing the past papers, time yourself. Set an alarm for how long you have to do the exam, and once it goes off (if you're still writing), stop what you're doing and go over it with the marking guide. Don't let yourself take hours and hours to go over a past paper, because you won't get to do that in the exam. It helps you practice managing your time as well.

When you are going over it with the marking guide, be really strict. Don't award yourself points for things that you 'knew you meant' or were 'sort of right'. If what you have actually written on paper doesn't match up with the marking guide - don't award yourself the marks. This way you can get a more realistic look into how you are doing.

Also be sure to create a study timetable. The Student Room has a handy online tool for this that you can use - https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/g/planner
"A good revision plan should be:
Realistic: everyone has good intentions, but be careful not to set a plan you can’t stick to. Nobody can do 12 hours of revision a day.
Detailed: a good plan breaks revision into chunks, specifies times for studying and assigns each time to a subject or topic.
Flexible: some topics are difficult and may take you longer than you planned. Don’t be afraid to adjust your plan accordingly."

Consider using the Pomodoro Technique as well, I know a lot of people find this helps them be more productive during their revision;
The process is simple. For every project throughout the day, you budget your time into short increments and take breaks periodically. You work for 25 minutes, then take break for five minutes.After four “pomodoros” have passed, (100 minutes of work time with 15 minutes of break time) you then take a 15-20 minute break. - http://www.lifehack.org/articles/pro...t-for-you.html

Have you checked out the revision resources that The Student Room has already? There are plenty of quizzes, pre-made flashcards, revision cards, revision notes, mind maps, crosswords, etc - https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/learning.php . Obviously these won't be quite as effective as you researching the topics in order to make these resources yourself, but they may still help you out. You can also make your own here - https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/g/make

Consider doing presentations as well! It can be great fun researching concepts / topics and creating a presentation. You can present it to a family member, a pet, or just deliver it to an object in your room. If you're presenting it to a person, try and get them to really quiz you on a topic. This can really help with revising, and I find this really useful myself.

If you feel the way you are revising is not really effective, then change your learning style up. Some people struggle with revision because they try and force themselves to revise in a way that isn't suitable for them - e.g. not everyone finds notes effectives, but there's the misconception that writing out notes is the main way to revise. Check out this website - https://learning-styles-online.com/overview/. It tells you about all the different learning styles, and gives you so many suggestions of how to revise. Try experimenting with different methods and see what works best for you!

Look on Youtube as well, there are plenty of videos about GCSE revision, GCSE subject help etc.
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omgitsamrit
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(Original post by EmmaCx)
You can definitely get good grades if you put the effort in, and you do still have time to revise. Don't put it off any longer though, and don't think 'Oh I've left it too long, there's no point now'. You will still be able to improve your grades by revising.

A big issue that a lot of people have when doing exams is, they don't really know what the question is asking them. People can know the content off by heart, but if they don't know what the question wants, then they can be easily dropping marks. Take the time to understand the command words that will be used throughout your exam. AQA has a really useful resource for this - http://www.aqa.org.uk/student-suppor...g-the-question. This will be the same regardless what exam board you are using.

"Question keywords are also called 'command' words. These are the words in your exam questions that tell you what the examiner wants you to do. By understanding these command words, you are on your way to understanding your exam questions.
For example, you may be instructed in your exam question to 'describe' something within your answer. If your answer 'evaluates' rather than 'sets out the characteristics', you potentially haven't given the right answer."

I would definitely recommend doing at least 2 or 3 past papers for each subject, ideally even more than that. Past papers are great because they give you experience with answering the exam questions, how you should word your answers etc. When you are doing the past papers, time yourself. Set an alarm for how long you have to do the exam, and once it goes off (if you're still writing), stop what you're doing and go over it with the marking guide. Don't let yourself take hours and hours to go over a past paper, because you won't get to do that in the exam. It helps you practice managing your time as well.

When you are going over it with the marking guide, be really strict. Don't award yourself points for things that you 'knew you meant' or were 'sort of right'. If what you have actually written on paper doesn't match up with the marking guide - don't award yourself the marks. This way you can get a more realistic look into how you are doing.

Also be sure to create a study timetable. The Student Room has a handy online tool for this that you can use - https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/g/planner
"A good revision plan should be:
Realistic: everyone has good intentions, but be careful not to set a plan you can’t stick to. Nobody can do 12 hours of revision a day.
Detailed: a good plan breaks revision into chunks, specifies times for studying and assigns each time to a subject or topic.
Flexible: some topics are difficult and may take you longer than you planned. Don’t be afraid to adjust your plan accordingly."

Consider using the Pomodoro Technique as well, I know a lot of people find this helps them be more productive during their revision;
The process is simple. For every project throughout the day, you budget your time into short increments and take breaks periodically. You work for 25 minutes, then take break for five minutes.After four “pomodoros” have passed, (100 minutes of work time with 15 minutes of break time) you then take a 15-20 minute break. - http://www.lifehack.org/articles/pro...t-for-you.html

Have you checked out the revision resources that The Student Room has already? There are plenty of quizzes, pre-made flashcards, revision cards, revision notes, mind maps, crosswords, etc - https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/learning.php . Obviously these won't be quite as effective as you researching the topics in order to make these resources yourself, but they may still help you out. You can also make your own here - https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/g/make

Consider doing presentations as well! It can be great fun researching concepts / topics and creating a presentation. You can present it to a family member, a pet, or just deliver it to an object in your room. If you're presenting it to a person, try and get them to really quiz you on a topic. This can really help with revising, and I find this really useful myself.

If you feel the way you are revising is not really effective, then change your learning style up. Some people struggle with revision because they try and force themselves to revise in a way that isn't suitable for them - e.g. not everyone finds notes effectives, but there's the misconception that writing out notes is the main way to revise. Check out this website - https://learning-styles-online.com/overview/. It tells you about all the different learning styles, and gives you so many suggestions of how to revise. Try experimenting with different methods and see what works best for you!

Look on Youtube as well, there are plenty of videos about GCSE revision, GCSE subject help etc.
thank you this will help alot
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