niteninja1
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Do we give mental health too much attention?

Are the majority of issues made up?

Is the majority of depression actually solveable by drugs?
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Rum Ham
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Do we give mental health too much attention? - No, but more so than attention, we need to spread more empathy towards suffers of MH problems as well as clearing up a lot of misconceptions about MH conditions

Are the majority of issues made up? - In a word, nope.

Is the majority of depression actually solveable by drugs? - Antidepressants might be enough to treat, not necessarily cure some people of their depression, anxiety, panic attacks etc but more often than not, it takes more than just medication to help someone. Antidepressants don't work like painkillers - you don't just pop a couple and the problem is gone. Psychological therapy, self help and physical therapy can all help as well and those are often used in conjunction with medication in those who choose to go down the medication road. Depression and several other MH problems can be successfully treated without medication but its up to the sufferer and their doctor to decide which is best and with everything else, its trial and error until you find what works for you personally.
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Kindred
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(Original post by niteninja1)
Do we give mental health too much attention?

Are the majority of issues made up?

Is the majority of depression actually solveable by drugs?
In my opinion...

1) We do not give mental health too much attention. If anything we give it too little or the wrong type of attention. We need to talk more about mh issues and learn what they are and how they work. It needs to be a topic people can talk about openly to encourage better knowledge.
When I say "the wrong type of attention" I mean things like thinking that people with mh issues are weak or stupid for allowing their emotions to get the better of them or that self harming is attention seeking and nothing more. People think they know what depression or ocd feels like because it's difficult to explain how much different it is from regular emotions. It's hard to explain depression without

saying "sad all the time" and normal people have obviously felt sadness so link it to that feeling. They have felt the type of sadness you can snap out of though so expect that it's the same sadness and people with depression just aren't trying to snap out of it.
And with OCD it's hard to understand the feeling of not being in control of your own mind. Saying "needs to clean things" sound like they are choosing that just like you choose to wash your hands after using the toilet. So it sounds to normal people that people with ocd are just choosing odd behaviours and are not thinking logically. In reality people with ocd will probably know that their urge is completely illogical, that doesn't help to stop their brain yelling it to them over and over though.
**

2) No, the majority of issues are not made up. It's difficult to tell what's unusual in terms of emotions since they are hard to compare (as I touched on above) so I can see why people could think that some things aren't a real condition and more of a personality type or something, but for the overwhelming majority they are real conditions and if anything are under diagnosed or not enough is known about them.

3) The majority of conditions are not solvable my drugs (or at least not any that we have currently). Not enough is known about the causes of most conditions to know what drugs would fix it. Things like SSRIS are used because there is a known like between serotonin levels and depression, but it is not known which causes which. The process of being diagnosed medication actually involves a fair amount of trial and error cos not enough is known to know which meds will work for each person. It's not like with infections where you can test for bacterial or fungal infection, know that that is the cause and give a drug specifically designed to kill it. It's basically a bunch of drugs that mess with emotions in various ways and you keep trying until you find one that masks your issues.That is not to say that medication is useless for it- we just don't have the right knowledge to use it better yet and it is not a permanent cure.

The main long term treatment for mh issues is therapy. There are different types of therapy which work better for different conditions, but they all generally work by helping you to fight the negative thought processes involved with mh issues. This will often be alongside medication, but it's the therapy which gives the long term ability to cope with issues that may arise and prevent relapse.
For some people medication will still be a long term necessity to manage the condition, but it definitely does not solve the problem.


I would be interested to hear your view on the matter too and maybe have a bit of a chat about it.


** I would just like to add that any uses of words like "normal" is not meant to imply that people with mh issues are not normal, I just can't think of a better word to distinguish sufferers from non-sufferers. You can safely assume that I do not mean any offence to sufferers (or anybody) with what I say so if a word implies it it is just me choosing a bad word by accident, but still if you have a better word please let me know.
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Kindred
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(Original post by Spock's Socks)
Do we give mental health too much attention? - No, but more so than attention, we need to spread more empathy towards suffers of MH problems as well as clearing up a lot of misconceptions about MH conditions

Are the majority of issues made up? - In a word, nope.

Is the majority of depression actually solveable by drugs? - Antidepressants might be enough to treat, not necessarily cure some people of their depression, anxiety, panic attacks etc but more often than not, it takes more than just medication to help someone. Antidepressants don't work like painkillers - you don't just pop a couple and the problem is gone. Psychological therapy, self help and physical therapy can all help as well and those are often used in conjunction with medication in those who choose to go down the medication road. Depression and several other MH problems can be successfully treated without medication but its up to the sufferer and their doctor to decide which is best and with everything else, its trial and error until you find what works for you personally.
Very well said, though I must say I found it hard to take my eyes off your pic long enough to read it. I don't trust it not to jump out my screen and eat me or something creepy like that.
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Rum Ham
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thanks :hugs:

Lol its Old Gregg from the TV show The Mighty Boosh if you like quirky comedy and some freaky but funny characters, then I recommend it :yep:
(Original post by Kindred)
Very well said, though I must say I found it hard to take my eyes off your pic long enough to read it. I don't trust it not to jump out my screen and eat me or something creepy like that.
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Kindred
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(Original post by Spock's Socks)
thanks :hugs:

Lol its Old Gregg from the TV show The Mighty Boosh if you like quirky comedy and some freaky but funny characters, then I recommend it :yep:
Cool. I need more funny stuff to watch so i'll check it out
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Deyesy
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(Original post by niteninja1)
Do we give mental health too much attention?

Are the majority of issues made up?

Is the majority of depression actually solveable by drugs?
1) Do we give mental health too much attention? - Absolutely not. If anything, there isn't enough attention given to mental health within society.

2) Are the majority of issues made up? They about as made up as someone going to A&E with a broken leg, when they've actually broken their leg So no, I'd say the opposite.

3) Is the majority of depression actually solveable by drugs? Solvable? No. Can anti-depressants aid people in leading life where their mental health doesn't affect their everyday activities? In some circumstances, most definitely but in others, it's much more complicated and deep rooted than just giving someone some tablets. Whilst they may level people out, they don't necessarily 'solve' the root cause of what may be and may have caused someone to end up with a diagnosis of depression.
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