D.Roy
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#1
I am currently doing my PGCE in Science. I was very apprehensive to do a PGCE but I always told myself, if I do not go into research, I would always become a teacher and I was keen to share my research experience with students.
At the beginning, it started very well, I was doing lesson observations and learning from experienced teachers. As soon as I started teaching, it all went downhill. None of my lessons were good enough, even if they were good, there was always a 'but you should have done this...' Towards the end, it knocked out my confidence, I was dreading to teach all the time despite preparing and thinking about everything to promote students' learning and preparing very good resources.
I didn't want to quit because I thought it was normal to feel that way, it is my first time teaching, I am new to this..I'll improve. I started my 2nd placement in a new school, I had to scrap everything i have learnt from my 1st placement and start from scratch..because my new school had a different way of teaching. It wasn't a smooth start for me but it improved but I am never good enough..despite having a good lesson, there's always a 'but' towards the end which didn't help at all.
Staying up late to prepare and plan lessons, prepare resources..marking, uni assignments...crying, frustrations..always tired.....there were weeks when my lessons went very well, I will be in a good mood and I tell myself becoming a teaching would be good, I enjoy it. There are times where I enjoyed it a lot..getting the thank you from students, feeling proud when you feel that you made a difference, it can be rewarding.
Other times, students insulting you, not respecting you..Teachers shouting you because your lesson was terrible despite spending hours to prepare for the lessons where you ask yourself why am I doing this?
It does sound like I am having a rant, but I have realised that teaching isn't for me. It might be easier when I'll start teaching my own lesson without being constantly observed.
Does anyone feel the same like I have?
0
reply
TitanCream
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 years ago
#2
Other teachers have shouted at you? Surely that is not acceptable?
0
reply
D.Roy
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#3
(Original post by TitanCream)
Other teachers have shouted at you? Surely that is not acceptable?
No it's not but being a trainee I had to put up with it! I have a friend who spoke back to her mentor who in the end complained to university about her behaving badly. Some did apologise in the end, for some reason they expect you to give great lessons when you start at the beginning.
0
reply
TitanCream
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 3 years ago
#4
(Original post by D.Roy)
No it's not but being a trainee I had to put up with it! I have a friend who spoke back to her mentor who in the end complained to university about her behaving badly. Some did apologise in the end, for some reason they expect you to give great lessons when you start at the beginning.
Wow. What else would you see yourself doing?
0
reply
beanbrain
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#5
Report 3 years ago
#5
(Original post by D.Roy)
None of my lessons were good enough, even if they were good, there was always a 'but you should have done this...'
Teaching is all about this. You shouldn't consider it as a criticism, but as a way of them trying to help you improve. Even teachers who have been teaching for years and years are told "maybe you should try this..." The fact is that, even as a teacher, you are still learning all the time, especially since every class you teach will be different, and require different tactics.

In itself, it shouldn't bother you that much. I know that is easier to say than to do, maybe - I always find the negatives in my own teaching practice, and struggle to find the positive things. However, it is important to look at what could have been done better or differently, because it really does help your teaching in the long run. To pass the NQT year, teachers only have to be at a "requires improvement" level, and although a lot of PGCE providers push for better, it isn't actually necessary to be better in your training year.

Other things, like being shouted at or actually criticised, are obviously not acceptable. But if people are giving you things that were good and things that could be improved, then you should be glad about that! Nobody is ever going to do everything perfectly, as teaching practice is subjective and dependent upon the class being taught, the lesson being taught, and the day on which it is being taught!

Obviously I don't know how the feedback was given to you, but for me it was always given in a constructive way - if this is the case for you, then you need to learn to take constructive criticism, because it should be given to you in any line of work anywhere. If it isn't constructive criticism that you are being given, then my advice is to somehow winkle it out of them! Ask them specifically what was good, and for ways to make the improvements you need.
3
reply
bcrazy
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#6
Report 3 years ago
#6
Teaching is hard work - there is no getting around that - and you do have to decide whether the positives of the job outweigh the stresses that go along with it. After leaving teaching for a bit after 3 years after burning out I realised that I loved the job too much and now love it more than ever.

To echo what brainbean said, do not feel downtrodden about the fact you always get a "but..." at the end of any lesson feedback. When I am mentoring new teachers I always give about 3 "what went wells" and about 3 "even better ifs" and I feel cheated if someone who comes to observe me doesn't give any areas for improvement - there are no lessons that can't be refined/improved is some way in retrospect and that's even when you are teaching it for the umpteenth time with years of experience.

In the end, only you can know what is right - just make sure you are making the decision for the right reasons. If you truly love some parts of the job then this can make up for a lot of downsides and you will continue to improve because you will really care. But only you can know whether it is worth it. I just want to tell you that it can be if you really do find it fulfilling.
0
reply
999tigger
Badges: 19
#7
Report 3 years ago
#7
(Original post by D.Roy)
I am currently doing my PGCE in Science. I was very apprehensive to do a PGCE but I always told myself, if I do not go into research, I would always become a teacher and I was keen to share my research experience with students.
At the beginning, it started very well, I was doing lesson observations and learning from experienced teachers. As soon as I started teaching, it all went downhill. None of my lessons were good enough, even if they were good, there was always a 'but you should have done this...' Towards the end, it knocked out my confidence, I was dreading to teach all the time despite preparing and thinking about everything to promote students' learning and preparing very good resources.
I didn't want to quit because I thought it was normal to feel that way, it is my first time teaching, I am new to this..I'll improve. I started my 2nd placement in a new school, I had to scrap everything i have learnt from my 1st placement and start from scratch..because my new school had a different way of teaching. It wasn't a smooth start for me but it improved but I am never good enough..despite having a good lesson, there's always a 'but' towards the end which didn't help at all.
Staying up late to prepare and plan lessons, prepare resources..marking, uni assignments...crying, frustrations..always tired.....there were weeks when my lessons went very well, I will be in a good mood and I tell myself becoming a teaching would be good, I enjoy it. There are times where I enjoyed it a lot..getting the thank you from students, feeling proud when you feel that you made a difference, it can be rewarding.
Other times, students insulting you, not respecting you..Teachers shouting you because your lesson was terrible despite spending hours to prepare for the lessons where you ask yourself why am I doing this?
It does sound like I am having a rant, but I have realised that teaching isn't for me. It might be easier when I'll start teaching my own lesson without being constantly observed.
Does anyone feel the same like I have?
If it isnt for you, then it isnt for you, but you sound a bit emo.
One size wont fit all and its good you learn to be flexible and adapt to different ways of teaching. Its also going to take some time to gain expertise. You need to learn to let some stress points go over your head.

If you want to do it and you believe you can do a good job, then learn from others and adapt. You shuld have more faith in yourself and stick with it.

If you get nothing out of it then consider when and how you will quit plus what else you wlll do.
1
reply
bob0079
Badges: 8
#8
Report 3 years ago
#8
Many workplaces can be like this. In every job there is pressure to do more/better all the time. With regards being shouted at, no you shouldnt be and no you dont have to take it. That is a management issue and you should have the confidence to address it. But do it politely and with tact.

It sounds to me like you enjoy teaching but maybe that school/department/mentor is wrong for you.

Have some belief and confidence in yourself. Get the course finished, pass it, do a year to get qts and then see how you feel. It may be hard to do all that, but at least you will have qualifications at the end, not wasted time with nothing to show.

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
ByEeek
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#9
Report 3 years ago
#9
(Original post by D.Roy)
Does anyone feel the same like I have?
Yep - that sounds like my experience. Except I have been lucky to work in two schools where behaviour isn't that much of an issue. It is hard and after a few months, there is no way that you can become the finished product. Teaching is so fickle. You can teach an amazing lesson on day one to class one and the next day, the same lesson with a different class will bomb. That is how it is.

And you can always improve. Don't take it personally. The key, is to be able to identify how you would improve before someone tells you. Reflective practice and all that.(S4d)

As for difference between placement A and B. Absolutely. Placement A for me was about what the students would do in lessons. Placement B was about what they will learn and how do I know they have learned it.

Teaching isn't for all, but PGCE is tough. We have one last stint before it is all over and then a summer of chill. Next year will be equally tough and then after that I reckon things will get easier.

Good luck!
0
reply
naturallygreezy
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#10
Report 3 years ago
#10
Not talking from experience, but having friends that have been teaching for 5+ years, I think the general gist is that the longer you stick with it, the easier it becomes. You already have lesson plans, know your own techniques and what works, more confident in yourself etc. There is no denying how tough it can be at the start, but I think that is something you should potentially consider before quitting now.
0
reply
myblueheaven339
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#11
Report 3 years ago
#11
I'm my opinion, if you don't love teaching then you owe it to yourself and the kids to do something else.


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
myblueheaven339
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#12
Report 3 years ago
#12
(Original post by naturallygreezy)
Not talking from experience, but having friends that have been teaching for 5+ years, I think the general gist is that the longer you stick with it, the easier it becomes. You already have lesson plans, know your own techniques and what works, more confident in yourself etc. There is no denying how tough it can be at the start, but I think that is something you should potentially consider before quitting now.
It doesn't get hat much easier, schemes of work are always changing, ofsted rules change etc. The well made plans and resources don't always have an much longevity as you may think. On top of that, the increased level of responsibility as you progress means that workloads increase too.


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
throwmeaway123
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#13
Report 3 years ago
#13
(Original post by myblueheaven339)
I'm my opinion, if you don't love teaching then you owe it to yourself and the kids to do something else.


Posted from TSR Mobile
^ THIS.

I was where you are about a month ago. Although I had fairly good feedback but I just wasn't finding it rewarding and I was unhappy. As I was a career changer I had something to compare it to when I went into it and I can honestly say I'm so glad I left. Have you thought about postponing, taking a break and seeing if you miss it? That's what I did and I've never been happier, if anything it's made me realise how much not teaching is amazing so I won't be going back.

For your own health, if you are unhappy you should leave.There are plenty of other jobs out there that will pay you more, will make you feel rewarded and where you can have your evening and weekends to enjoy life.
0
reply
yhuss98
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#14
Report 3 weeks ago
#14
To be honest I’m late but..
i would have just said stick by it.. think about the pros PGCE is a good qualification & more than likely you were placed in bad schools
Science is in demand.. and STEM generally speaking
Being from this, you can demand things really because you wont be replaced easily
My advice is stick by it, get the qual. so you have something to fall back onto!
1
reply
Mr M
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#15
Report 3 weeks ago
#15
(Original post by yhuss98)
To be honest I’m late but..
i would have just said stick by it.. think about the pros PGCE is a good qualification & more than likely you were placed in bad schools
Science is in demand.. and STEM generally speaking
Being from this, you can demand things really because you wont be replaced easily
My advice is stick by it, get the qual. so you have something to fall back onto!
The person you are speaking to last visited TSR in 2016.
0
reply
yhuss98
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#16
Report 3 weeks ago
#16
^^ Yeah Hence I said I’m late
But i think the advice will still stand, for anyone who sees the thread tomorrow or in a few years
0
reply
Scotney
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#17
Report 3 weeks ago
#17
(Original post by yhuss98)
To be honest I’m late but..
i would have just said stick by it.. think about the pros PGCE is a good qualification & more than likely you were placed in bad schools
Science is in demand.. and STEM generally speaking
Being from this, you can demand things really because you wont be replaced easily
My advice is stick by it, get the qual. so you have something to fall back onto!
(Original post by yhuss98)
^^ Yeah Hence I said I’m late
But i think the advice will still stand, for anyone who sees the thread tomorrow or in a few years
Fair point and for the record I agree with your conclusions.
1
reply
SarcAndSpark
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#18
Report 2 weeks ago
#18
(Original post by yhuss98)
To be honest I’m late but..
i would have just said stick by it.. think about the pros PGCE is a good qualification & more than likely you were placed in bad schools
Science is in demand.. and STEM generally speaking
Being from this, you can demand things really because you wont be replaced easily
My advice is stick by it, get the qual. so you have something to fall back onto!
FWIW I disagree that you can "demand" things as a science teacher. Obviously it depends on the school, and physics teachers may have more leverage than others. Also, if what you ask for will upset other science teachers, then the school has to strike a balance.

There are some things you can negotiate in science/maths that you maybe can't in other subjects, but saying you can demand things is likely to give people the wrong impression and may set them up for failure as an NQT.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Are you confident you could find support for your mental health if you needed it in COVID-19?

Yes (53)
21.46%
No (194)
78.54%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise