stationeryaddict
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
I wanna do a level art in sixth form, I put it down as an option with maths and physics on my sixth form application but I've been contemplating it ever since. I haven't done art at gcse , I recently decided that I want to be an architect and most unviersities like a portfolio, I didn't really know what to pick for my GCSEs at the time. I was wondering how hard it would be since I have no experience of the subject. I spoke to an art teacher at my school and she said she'd be happy to take me on, I just don't know what to expect really
0
reply
bloated_utopia
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 years ago
#2
firstly, do you have any experience with drawing? ideally from life seeing as drawing from photos gives your brain less information to work off and thus creates less neuro-networks. if you are at least good at drawing i'd say your ok. if you feel unconfident about your drawing skills practice in the summer from real life; i'd suggest to be making the most progress to get an easel (you can get them for like £15-20) for bigger sustained drawings and then get hardback sketchbook for more casual practice. this is due to the fact that if you draw flat on a table it distorts your view of said object and then it goes weird proportionally; hardback sketchbooks can be treated like an easel posture wise. study how all the old masters drew - stuff that will be especially useful for architecture. this includes drawing in straight lines, planes, proportions, golden ratio, perspective, sight-size vs comparative. there are a lot of resources both online and in books to learn about this stuff. i suspect there are also equal resources on architectural drawing. idk if this is obvious but it took me a while to catch on, but when drawing use your pencil to measure what your drawing and make sure your arm is straight. if you do this all summer, as many days you can, you should make decent progress. you could even do drawing courses/go to life drawing sessions if you have the funds.

once you get to the a-level, if you are sure architecture's what you want to do, just make your practice focused on what's relevant to that. keep practicing your drawing and maybe do some 3-d work - both very relevant to architecture. things like painting, printing, lens-media are great fun and i'd say if you feel like experimenting go for it because it won't do any harm; although if the a-level is a means-to-an-end type thing for you drawing, digital and 3-d are most relevant to architecture. from my experience, a-level art is structured at the beginning, but gradually it becomes freer, so you have to make it work for you. some ideas: find some architectural design programs and make weird digital art with it in photoshop. make collages of buildings. do some paper engineering (there are great books on it). just go for it i guess. workload/difficulty wise it depends on your art department and how hard you find your other subjects. i don't know a lot about workload stuff since i dropped out of a-levels after one month for other reasons, but within the month i found the workload manageable.
1
reply
stationeryaddict
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#3
(Original post by bloated_utopia)
firstly, do you have any experience with drawing? ideally from life seeing as drawing from photos gives your brain less information to work off and thus creates less neuro-networks. if you are at least good at drawing i'd say your ok. if you feel unconfident about your drawing skills practice in the summer from real life; i'd suggest to be making the most progress to get an easel (you can get them for like £15-20) for bigger sustained drawings and then get hardback sketchbook for more casual practice. this is due to the fact that if you draw flat on a table it distorts your view of said object and then it goes weird proportionally; hardback sketchbooks can be treated like an easel posture wise. study how all the old masters drew - stuff that will be especially useful for architecture. this includes drawing in straight lines, planes, proportions, golden ratio, perspective, sight-size vs comparative. there are a lot of resources both online and in books to learn about this stuff. i suspect there are also equal resources on architectural drawing. idk if this is obvious but it took me a while to catch on, but when drawing use your pencil to measure what your drawing and make sure your arm is straight. if you do this all summer, as many days you can, you should make decent progress. you could even do drawing courses/go to life drawing sessions if you have the funds.

once you get to the a-level, if you are sure architecture's what you want to do, just make your practice focused on what's relevant to that. keep practicing your drawing and maybe do some 3-d work - both very relevant to architecture. things like painting, printing, lens-media are great fun and i'd say if you feel like experimenting go for it because it won't do any harm; although if the a-level is a means-to-an-end type thing for you drawing, digital and 3-d are most relevant to architecture. from my experience, a-level art is structured at the beginning, but gradually it becomes freer, so you have to make it work for you. some ideas: find some architectural design programs and make weird digital art with it in photoshop. make collages of buildings. do some paper engineering (there are great books on it). just go for it i guess. workload/difficulty wise it depends on your art department and how hard you find your other subjects. i don't know a lot about workload stuff since i dropped out of a-levels after one month for other reasons, but within the month i found the workload manageable.
Thanks for replying. I do draw in my spare time but I haven't been able to do much in my sketchbook lately cos of revision. I wouldn't say I'm completely and utterly confident in drawing since I haven't had the two years of gcse art to develop my skills but I know I can get better with practice, I'm not bad as such. I like the idea of making art with architectural design programmes and paper engineering etc. And I'll defo look into getting an easel and practicing in summer. Thank you for your advise
1
reply
bloated_utopia
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 years ago
#4
(Original post by stationeryaddict)
Thanks for replying. I do draw in my spare time but I haven't been able to do much in my sketchbook lately cos of revision. I wouldn't say I'm completely and utterly confident in drawing since I haven't had the two years of gcse art to develop my skills but I know I can get better with practice, I'm not bad as such. I like the idea of making art with architectural design programmes and paper engineering etc. And I'll defo look into getting an easel and practicing in summer. Thank you for your advise
no problem and good luck!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you think receiving Teacher Assessed Grades will impact your future?

I'm worried it will negatively impact me getting into university/college (46)
37.1%
I'm worried that I’m not academically prepared for the next stage in my educational journey (12)
9.68%
I'm worried it will impact my future career (5)
4.03%
I'm worried that my grades will be seen as ‘lesser’ because I didn’t take exams (29)
23.39%
I don’t think that receiving these grades will impact my future (22)
17.74%
I think that receiving these grades will affect me in another way (let us know in the discussion!) (10)
8.06%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed