Why was Dr. Dao asked to leave the plane? Watch

Et Tu, Brute?
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Obviously lots of coverage in the news about the united airlines flight. But I've only seen the video and heard he refused to leave. However why was he asked to leave in the first place? If they over book and nobody wants to give up their seat, surely they don't just say, 'nah you're getting off the flight'?

I've found the details of the whole thing pretty obscure.
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the bear
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they pick names at random using a computer.
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CurlyBen
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(Original post by the bear)
they pick names at random using a computer.
I don't think it's at random, I think factors like price paid for the ticket and when it was booked come into it. Somewhere there will be a standard operating procedure for it.

I actually feel sorry for United over the whole issue. Overbooking is one of the things that makes flights cheap, so I have no issue with the practice, and the compensation is normally generous. It's also in the terms and conditions accepted when booking the ticket. As for the way the guy was treated on the aircraft, the security team are not United employees.
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joe cooley
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Basically Dr Dao reacted badly and came unstuck...

Best thing to do when faced with unassailable authority in a situation like this is to silently seethe.

The man has let his emotions run away with him and paid the price.

As an ethnic perhaps he thought himself untouchable, judging from the reaction of the more sensitive types, one can understand how he reached that conclusion.

On the plus side i see lots of compo heading his way.

Imagine the prescription drugs he'll be able to buy with that!

Fun times ahead for the Dr.
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
Obviously lots of coverage in the news about the united airlines flight. But I've only seen the video and heard he refused to leave. However why was he asked to leave in the first place? If they over book and nobody wants to give up their seat, surely they don't just say, 'nah you're getting off the flight'?

I've found the details of the whole thing pretty obscure.
Overbooking is normally detected before people board the plane and there are appeals at the check-in desk for people to switch flights, offers of upgrades, etc. Sometimes airlines even offer money or flight vouchers to persuade people to switch in those situations.

The incident was bizarre and shows United in a very bad light even before the local cops were brought in to hussle him off the plane, causing him injury along the way. They clearly have collapsing systems and this is doubtless based on the intense cheapening of air travel and the staff being under pressure to turn flights round as rapidly as possible, etc.

There also seems to be racism involved in this - other passengers report that several white passengers strongly objected to being removed and were allowed to stay.
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Et Tu, Brute?
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
Overbooking is normally detected before people board the plane and there are appeals at the check-in desk for people to switch flights, offers of upgrades, etc. Sometimes airlines even offer money or flight vouchers to persuade people to switch in those situations.

The incident was bizarre and shows United in a very bad light even before the local cops were brought in to hussle him off the plane, causing him injury along the way. They clearly have collapsing systems and this is doubtless based on the intense cheapening of air travel and the staff being under pressure to turn flights round as rapidly as possible, etc.

There also seems to be racism involved in this - other passengers report that several white passengers strongly objected to being removed and were allowed to stay.
I know how the overbooking system works. What I do not understand is why this person was singled out
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joe cooley
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(Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
I know how the overbooking system works. What I do not understand is why this person was singled out
Singled out?

Weren't another three people "singled" out too.
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Good bloke
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(Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
I know how the overbooking system works. What I do not understand is why this person was singled out
It was nothing to do with overbooking. It was about the convenience of United being prioritised in an inhumane manner over passenger service.The facts are:

The flight was exactly full.

Passengers boarded.

Before take-off, four United crew members turned up at the gate looking for a lift to enable them to be rostered at the destination airport.

Rather than ask the crew members to report to a later available flight, or send them in a taxi, or train, volunteers to be re-booked were sought from among the boarded passengers, and some (but not enough) were found, though United did not offer as much compensation as the limit they set themselves.

Compulsory eviction was then attempted, resisted by Mr Dao, who is 69 years old and claimed to have patients to see in the morning (though that is irrelevant).

Security was called who sent three chaps to drag him off, breaking his nose and two teeth, giving him concussion, and causing him to need reconstructive surgery on his sinuses. He was hospitalised.

Mr Dao has appointed a hotshot lawyer who will sue United for a lot of money, and, no doubt, succeed.
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eugaurie
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To get to the other side.
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Good bloke
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(Original post by joe cooley)
Weren't another three people "singled" out too.
Dao was the only compulsory ejection; the rest volunteered, I believe.
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Good bloke
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
There also seems to be racism involved in this
Denied by Dao's lawyer.
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joe cooley
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(Original post by Good bloke)
Dao was the only compulsory ejection; the rest volunteered, I believe.
Believe or know?
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Good bloke
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(Original post by joe cooley)
Believe or know?
Believe, as stated. Reports indicate that some volunteers were found, but not enough, and nobody else has been named or even mentioned as being evicted..
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Et Tu, Brute?
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(Original post by Good bloke)
It was nothing to do with overbooking. It was about the convenience of United being prioritised in an inhumane manner over passenger service.The facts are:

The flight was exactly full.

Passengers boarded.

Before take-off, four United crew members turned up at the gate looking for a lift to enable them to be rostered at the destination airport.

Rather than ask the crew members to report to a later available flight, or send them in a taxi, or train, volunteers to be re-booked were sought from among the boarded passengers, and some (but not enough) were found, though United did not offer as much compensation as the limit they set themselves.

Compulsory eviction was then attempted, resisted by Mr Dao, who is 69 years old and claimed to have patients to see in the morning (though that is irrelevant).

Security was called who sent three chaps to drag him off, breaking his nose and two teeth, giving him concussion, and causing him to need reconstructive surgery on his sinuses. He was hospitalised.

Mr Dao has appointed a hotshot lawyer who will sue United for a lot of money, and, no doubt, succeed.
I still don't get why he was selected though, they just picked his name from a digital hat or...?
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Good bloke
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(Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
I still don't get why he was selected though, they just picked his name from a digital hat or...?
They claim to have done so, yes. Though if, as I surmise, his wife volunteered to go, it seems a bit of a stretch to find that his adjacent seat came up entirely by random selection. Exactly who volunteered, though, is not entirely clear.
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joe cooley
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(Original post by Good bloke)
Believe, as stated. Reports indicate that some volunteers were found, but not enough, and nobody else has been named or even mentioned as being evicted..
Obviously, none of the others reacted as badly as Dao so avoided the manhandling and subsequent publicity he received.
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Good bloke
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(Original post by joe cooley)
Obviously, none of the others reacted as badly as Dao so avoided the manhandling he received.
What would you have done? He refused to go, and they almost certainly had no right to evict him as there was no overbooking going on. Being violent against someone reasonably arguing his rights is hardly the action of a sensible airline, is it?

Or would you have meekly submitted?
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Kravence
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(Original post by Good bloke)
They claim to have done so, yes. Though if, as I surmise, his wife volunteered to go, it seems a bit of a stretch to find that his adjacent seat came up entirely by random selection. Exactly who volunteered, though, is not entirely clear.
Same thoughts here, they probably assumed he would go with her for convenience.
I don't know why they couldn't have just moved on to someone else instead trying to force the man who had good reason to be on that flight
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Ladymusiclover
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If no one volunteers what is the correct procedure?
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joe cooley
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(Original post by Good bloke)
What would you have done? He refused to go, and they almost certainly had no right to evict him as there was no overbooking going on. Being violent against someone reasonably arguing his rights is hardly the action of a sensible airline, is it?

Or would you have meekly submitted?
Me.

I'd have argued the toss but once the cops/security turned up i'd have quietly seethed and done as asked.

Or would you have meekly submitted?

No doubt you would have took the cops on.
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