why is acetylcholine unlikely to be found in the cns? Watch

liverpool2044
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i thought it had a big role in the cns but i saw this statement somewhere
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Kallisto
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(Original post by liverpool2044)
i thought it had a big role in the cns but i saw this statement somewhere
Acetylcholine has the function to open the ion channels of postsynaptic membranes, so the stimuluses in form of an action potential overcome the synapses.

Synapses and postsynaptic membranes are a part of neurons and the neurons in turn count to vegetative nerve system. Acethylcholine helps to transfer the stimuluses in vegetative nerve system. The central nerve system just regulates and handles the stimuluses. This is a function which acethylcholine is not responsible for.

Is it that what did you want to know?
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liverpool2044
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(Original post by Kallisto)
Acetylcholine has the function to open the ion channels of postsynaptic membranes, so the stimuluses in form of an action potential overcome the synapses.

Synapses and postsynaptic membranes are a part of neurons and the neurons in turn count to vegetative nerve system. Acethylcholine helps to transfer the stimuluses in vegetative nerve system. The central nerve system just regulates and handles the stimuluses. This is a function which acethylcholine is not responsible for.

Is it that what did you want to know?
thats great so does it play a role in both the autonomic and somatic?
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Kallisto
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(Original post by liverpool2044)
thats great so does it play a role in both the autonomic and somatic?
Yeah, would say so, as those have neurons with the synapses where acethylcholine is in existence to work as explained above.
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username2769500
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It's in the muscles and it is in the brain but it's mainly in skeletal muscle because of the negative feedback.
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neveroddoreven
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ACh is a neurotransmitter that has roles in both the peripheral nervous system and central nervous system.
In the PNS it is responsible for the parasympathetic autonomic nervous system, as well as somatic control.
It does definitely have a role in the CNS. The CNS however also uses Dopamine, Serotonin, Glutamate, Glycine, NO and a bunch of other neurotransmitters so the role of ACh is smaller.
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