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TheAnxiousSloth
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#1
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Why would this be a limitation to a theory?
I get that the theory wouldn't actually tell you why something has occurred, but I'm not sure how to expand on that.
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iammichealjackson
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(Original post by LeCroissant)
Why would this be a limitation to a theory?
I get that the theory wouldn't actually tell you why something has occurred, but I'm not sure how to expand on that.
This question makes 0 sense. Although the fact you can string the words together in any coherent matter is impressive for a sentient pastry
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TheAnxiousSloth
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(Original post by iammichealjackson)
This question makes 0 sense. Although the fact you can string the words together in any coherent matter is impressive for a sentient pastry
Don't get cheeky to the croissant.

In my psychology textbook, one of the evaluation points for a theory is that it is a better description than an explanation, but it doesn't say why that is a limitation.
For example, Kohlberg's cognitive theory of offending behaviour describes the dysfunctional cognitive processes that offenders have, but it doesn't explain why they have those cognitive processes.
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iammichealjackson
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(Original post by LeCroissant)
Don't get cheeky to the croissant.

In my psychology textbook, one of the evaluation points for a theory is that it is a better description than an explanation, but it doesn't say why that is a limitation.
For example, Kohlberg's cognitive theory of offending behaviour describes the dysfunctional cognitive processes that offenders have, but it doesn't explain why they have those cognitive processes.
I'm not really sure how you are using "theory" and "explanation" here, as they aren't really seen as opposing things which you can interchange. I'm not sure if i'm just ignorant, or if this is just a level psychology being rubbish again.

One thing which may help is this https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tinber...four_questions

Theories can be devised to explain development, (and why individuals may differ in cognitive processes), but you can also develop theories about the mechanism (causal theories about cognitive factors underpinning offending). Theories are used for both of these things (see the link above).
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TheAnxiousSloth
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(Original post by iammichealjackson)
I'm not really sure how you are using "theory" and "explanation" here, as they aren't really seen as opposing things which you can interchange. I'm not sure if i'm just ignorant, or if this is just a level psychology being rubbish again.

One thing which may help is this https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tinber...four_questions

Theories can be devised to explain development, (and why individuals may differ in cognitive processes), but you can also develop theories about the mechanism (causal theories about cognitive factors underpinning offending). Theories are used for both of these things (see the link above).
Hmmm. This is what my textbook says:
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I'm just not sure how I'd include this evaluation point in an essay. Perhaps if I compared the cognitive theory to a biological theory which explains the causes behind offending behaviour, and then discussed the advantages and disadvantages of both then that would be okay?..
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iammichealjackson
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(Original post by LeCroissant)
Hmmm. This is what my textbook says:
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I'm just not sure how I'd include this evaluation point in an essay. Perhaps if I compared the cognitive theory to a biological theory which explains the causes behind offending behaviour, and then discussed the advantages and disadvantages of both then that would be okay?..
So this is just a level psychology being a bit simplistic with use of the term "cognitive approach". There is a whole area of science called cognitive development - as the name suggest, this area of research studies the development of cognition (including how criminal behaviour develops).

I'm probably not the best person to give any a level psychology advice though, after doing undergrad + postgrad psych you just lose the ability to dumb yourself down to a level standards (not criticising you, but the a level). You just need to give what the examiners are intending (i'm not really sure what they are going for, the whole premise of the question seems to be wrong to me, and i'd just criticse that and get a C grade).
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TheAnxiousSloth
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(Original post by iammichealjackson)
So this is just a level psychology being a bit simplistic with use of the term "cognitive approach". There is a whole area of science called cognitive development - as the name suggest, this area of research studies the development of cognition (including how criminal behaviour develops).

I'm probably not the best person to give any a level psychology advice though, after doing undergrad + postgrad psych you just lose the ability to dumb yourself down to a level standards (not criticising you, but the a level). You just need to give what the examiners are intending (i'm not really sure what they are going for, the whole premise of the question seems to be wrong to me, and i'd just criticse that and get a C grade).
I see what you mean. I'm hoping to do undergraduate and postgraduate psychology too .
To be honest, I don't really like how our essays are marked at A-level (we have to use P.E.E structure for our evaluation points and if we don't do that then our teacher refuses to give us the marks). Each essay has to include five P.E.E.s to get full marks and the question I made this thread about would just be one of the P.E.E.s.
I don't actually have to include 'Descriptive not explanatory' in any of the essays, but I was wondering if someone could make more sense of it than I can .
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