University student lynched for "blasphemy" in Pakistan Watch

generallee
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#1
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-39593302

What a world we live in. Makes you think about what a joke the whole concept of "safe spaces" on British campuses is, doesn't it?

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Reality Check
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(Original post by Mathemagicien)
He was being terribly offensive. Racism against Islam is unacceptable. It is a shame that Facebook did not remove his hateful tirade, instead leaving the students to defend themselves against his hate speech.
Exactly - it was entirely inappropriate and should have been removed much more promptly than it was.
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RKeyensJ
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(Original post by Mathemagicien)
He was being terribly offensive. Racism against Islam is unacceptable. It is a shame that Facebook did not remove his hateful tirade, instead leaving the students to defend themselves against his hate speech.
What did he say that was so offensive it merited his heinous murder? Trump once said black people aren't smart enough to count his money- do I want to kill him? Obviously not.
Pakistan (or at least the part in which he was killed) is backward.
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lmaowut
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Whilst blasphemy laws are degenerate and has no place in modern society, what they did was reckless; They knew that it broke the law so they really should not have said what they did
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username3110466
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he was breaking the law...
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Katzen
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Alright look, what happened, it was terrible. No one should have to get killed because of their views. This student I don't know what he was thinking, this didn't happen in America this happened in The Islamic Republic of Pakistan, people in Azad Kashmir tell me how crazy the country can get sometimes.

In other words, the student was asking for it. This is a lesson, do what you want but don't do it where the law/people will chew your arse if you want to live. I'm living in a Muslim-majority area and if I was an atheist, I would never go around telling people this because word spreads fast plus there's nothing for me to gain if I was to announce such change.
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The Epicurean
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To quote Abdurrahman Wahid, former Indonesian president and former leader of Nahdlatul Ulama, the largest independent Islamic organisation in the world:

As Muslims, rather than harshly condemn others’ speech or beliefs, and employing threats or violence to constrain these, we should ask: why is there so little freedom of expression, and religion, in the so-called Muslim world? Exactly whose interests are served by laws such as Section 295-C of the Pakistani legal code, “Defiling the Name of Muhammad,” which mandates the death penalty for “blasphemy”[?]…

Rather than serve to protect God, Islam or Muhammad, such deliberately vague and repressive laws merely empower those with a worldly (i.e., political) agenda, and act as a “sword of Damocles” threatening not only religious minorities, but the right of mainstream Muslims to speak freely about their own religion without being threatened by the wrath of fundamentalists – exercised through the power of government or mobs – whose claims of “defending religion” are little more than a pretext for self-aggrandizement.
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Katzen
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(Original post by generallee)
Sounds like victim blaming to me.

He probably had absolutely no idea that he would actually be tortured and then murdered for not believing in this god of theirs.

Even in backward hellholes like rural Pakistan it is hard to believe such complete, insanity is possible in the twenty first century.

You also have to ask what kind of religion could prompt such evil? The people that did this must seriously believe they are going to heaven and have pleased, or at least appeased, their god.

What else can they think? Why else would they do it?

There's some things you just DON'T do. I wouldn't smuggle alcohol into Afghanistan to drink in the public because I know I will get punished. There has been numerous news in Pakistan of people committing blasphemy and getting punished. He probably had no idea that he would get 1) tortured 2) killed by civilians but any Pakistani should know that they would get punished by the law one way or another. Hell, I'm in the UK and even I wouldn't dare to post anything anti-religion on my social media because I know there are crazy people out there who will do anything and I wouldn't gain anything from it, worst for him because he also has a country that'll do anything.

I'd be surprised if a university student doesn't know what his insane country is capable of.

The question of whether Islam is dangerous religion or not will never be accepted, there's just too many factors. The one important question that the victim should've asked is "what will I gain by committing blasphemy in Pakistan?".
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generallee
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(Original post by Katzen)
There's some things you just DON'T do. I wouldn't smuggle alcohol into Afghanistan to drink in the public because I know I will get punished. There has been numerous news in Pakistan of people committing blasphemy and getting punished. He probably had no idea that he would get 1) tortured 2) killed by civilians but any Pakistani should know that they would get punished by the law one way or another. Hell, I'm in the UK and even I wouldn't dare to post anything anti-religion on my social media because I know there are crazy people out there who will do anything and I wouldn't gain anything from it, worst for him because he also has a country that'll do anything.

I'd be surprised if a university student doesn't know what his insane country is capable of.

The question of whether Islam is dangerous religion or not will never be accepted, there's just too many factors. The one important question that the victim should've asked is "what will I gain by committing blasphemy in Pakistan?".
Victim blaming.

According to this account he actually was Muslim but also a free thinker.

He got into an argument in a dorm room and was then turned on by a mob with the police turning a blind eye because it was good that an unbeliever was being sent to hell.

What a country, what a religion.

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-pa...-idUSKBN17G1D5
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Kvothe the Arcane
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Shocking activity.

(Original post by RF_PineMarten)
I don't know what's more disgusting, the fact that this attack happened and similar attacks happen regularly in Pakistan, or the fact that people on this forum are blaming the victim for it.
I think people are being sarcastic.
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Golden State
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Thank god I don't live there anymore.

It doesn't surprise that such things continue to happen in Pakistan. It is an absolutely terrible place to live for minorities and non-believers.
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RF_PineMarten
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(Original post by Kvothe the Arcane)
I think people are being sarcastic.
I know mathemagicien is, but I'm not sure about some of the others.
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Katzen
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(Original post by generallee)
Victim blaming.

According to this account he actually was Muslim but also a free thinker.

He got into an argument in a dorm room and was then turned on by a mob with the police turning a blind eye because it was good that an unbeliever was being sent to hell.

What a country, what a religion.

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-pa...-idUSKBN17G1D5
(Original post by Tabstercat)
really...
1) You keep bringing up victim-blaming in order to make me look like a psychopath, call it what you want. There are some things you DON'T do.

2) Hey, what he did was what he did. I've helped many ex-Muslims online because I and a few others stopped them from telling their parents about their apostasy (they thought it was a good idea) or they felt the need to criticise Islam on the internet using the damn internet cafe.

3) I know you hate Pakistan, Islam and the law. I know, I genuinely sympathise with you on that. I'm saying he doesn't deserve it, I never want ex-Muslims to die for their lack of faith, his situation could've been avoided had he look at the flag of his country and realised that he's not in the free world.

4) Had this happened in the West, then you'd see a different side of me. I'd go "what the hell is this? This is the west! Why are these people here if they can't accept freedom of speech, the main principle of the country they inhabit?" But this is PAKISTAN, there was NO reason for his to write his comments on the INTERNET.
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