Why does Anaerobic respiration produce little ATP? Watch

teenhorrorstory
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^^^
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Gerry-Atricks
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Absence of oxygen- The anaerobic respiration, in the absence of oxygen, cannot continue the process of undergoing Krebs cycle and electron transport chain as these two processes are for aerobic only. So can only produce ATP through glycolysis- relatively little per glucose
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teenhorrorstory
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(Original post by Reality Check)
It's a little rude just to put '^^^^' - you could at least ask people politely if they could spare some time to help you - we are doing it voluntarily, after all.

What do you know about anaerobic respiration? Do you know what glycolysis is?
Sorry

Yes. In my textbook it says that the Krebs cycle cannot function in anaerobic respiration as all the NAD is reduced. I'm confused as to why the Krebs cycle cannot work with NADH

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teenhorrorstory
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(Original post by glad-he-ate-her)
Absence of oxygen- The anaerobic respiration, in the absence of oxygen, cannot continue the process of undergoing Krebs cycle and electron transport chain as these two processes are for aerobic only. So can only produce ATP through glycolysis- relatively little per glucose
Thanks for replying

Why can it not undergo krebs cycle and ETC in the absence of oxygen?
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Gerry-Atricks
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(Original post by teenhorrorstory)
Thanks for replying

Why can it not undergo krebs cycle and ETC in the absence of oxygen?
The Krebs cycle does not use oxygen, though it does stop in the absence of oxygen because it runs out of NAD and FAD. When there's a lack of oxygen, the electron transfer chain cannot pass on their electron loads (remember oxygen is the final electron acceptor - it forms water after accepting the electrons). Thus, the ETC cannot accept electrons from the electron carriers NADH/H+ and FADH2 since all the complexes are in their reduced state. In turn, the 2 electron carriers are locked in their reduced state too, causing a depletion of oxidised state electron carriers NAD+ and FAD+. This means that a backlog of electrons will exist (no oxygen, no transfer of electrons to form water). All the NAD+ in the mitochondria will be used up, which means the Krebs cycle will come to a stand still (some enzymes in the Krebs Cycle require NAD+ as a substrate).
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