Level 7,8,9 english GCSE essays Watch

llleahll
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#21
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#21
(Original post by chloerhia)
I've never really revised for Great Expectations- I really enjoy the book so I've read it and annotated so many different copies it is just in my memory really!
But definitely for all of the texts I make REALLY detailed mindmaps on each character and theme, and then plan points you could make in an essay for each of those - as the question style is very much the same each time. So say for An Inspector Calls you could brainstorm 5/6 points you could make about responsibility or Eric etc.. and then you have those in the back of your mind for the exam, which also helps with initial stress/panic in the exam over what to write! Also it may help to go over different key relationships in each text - particularly Shakespeare/Dickens, as these came up in my mocks.

For quotes, if you made the brief essay plan/points you could pick out which quote could go with your point, making that around 5 for each major character/theme, but a lot of quotes are reusable so it may end up less than that! And for the Dickens section you don't always have to quote, you can use references to the text if you don't have an exact quote - for example saying Mrs Joe often hit Pip and Joe, would be sufficient!

Anthology poetry I made my own "revision guide" using class notes instead of the revision guides, as my English teacher said it's to our advantage to write original points instead of what they've seen repeated a lot from the standard revision guides!

For unseen poetry if you're really unsure on what to write, pick interesting, or things that stand out to you from the poems! Structure you can easily focus on the beginning and end - and then form just point out something about how it is written - 1st/2nd person, any personas or rhyme scheme etc..

Wow sorry this was long I hope it helps though!


do you think you could upload your revision guide too?
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thotproduct
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#22
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#22
I made it all up on the day and got a 9.
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gabby:)
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#23
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#23
Hi, if anyone wanted an example of 8/9ish work solely on context from lord of the flies I have attached a link down here https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B9...1mMzJKcXpDdTlB
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inspireme123
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#24
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#24
im new to this student room, was wondering if you could help with english notes as im sitting my GCSE this year. Thank you
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Ellie dalts
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#25
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#25
Bit late but this was a grade 8 for Romeo and Juliet.Throughout act three scene five, Shakespeare used language, but mostly his characters, to portray the contrasting ideas of parental relationships. Starting with the juxtaposition of “worthy” and “unworthy” from lord capulet. Capulet presents his own daughter as nothing, and something of remotely importance, all because she won’t marry Paris, someone of whom she clearly doesn’t love. However he speaks of Paris in a higher view due to his egotistical view that if Juliet marries someone of wealth and high importance, then essentially he can have all that too, which shows his aristocracy. I believe this exhibits just how little he cares about his own daughter and her feelings, compared to how much he cares about the high power. As an Elizabethan audience member, a sense of transgression comes through, as we can almost argue Juliet is breaking the rules of society by differing from the expectations. On the contrary as an audience how we can definitely disagree with Capulet’s manor as it’s nit at all the stereotypical father Daugher relationship, he’s treating her with a lot of disrespect. In my view, Shakespeare wanted a modern day audience to reakly think about how times have changed, and even go against the side of lord capulet, whcub he did so effectively as we feel so much melancholy for Juliet; she’s getting so much grief for being independent and transgressing. This all links back to the iambic pentameter in the prologue, ABAB CDCD EFEF GG implying that they’re aligned however, we know as an audience they’re not through dramatic irony.
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Xe.
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#26
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#26
(Original post by chloerhia)
I've never really revised for Great Expectations- I really enjoy the book so I've read it and annotated so many different copies it is just in my memory really!
But definitely for all of the texts I make REALLY detailed mindmaps on each character and theme, and then plan points you could make in an essay for each of those - as the question style is very much the same each time. So say for An Inspector Calls you could brainstorm 5/6 points you could make about responsibility or Eric etc.. and then you have those in the back of your mind for the exam, which also helps with initial stress/panic in the exam over what to write! Also it may help to go over different key relationships in each text - particularly Shakespeare/Dickens, as these came up in my mocks.

For quotes, if you made the brief essay plan/points you could pick out which quote could go with your point, making that around 5 for each major character/theme, but a lot of quotes are reusable so it may end up less than that! And for the Dickens section you don't always have to quote, you can use references to the text if you don't have an exact quote - for example saying Mrs Joe often hit Pip and Joe, would be sufficient!

Anthology poetry I made my own "revision guide" using class notes instead of the revision guides, as my English teacher said it's to our advantage to write original points instead of what they've seen repeated a lot from the standard revision guides!

For unseen poetry if you're really unsure on what to write, pick interesting, or things that stand out to you from the poems! Structure you can easily focus on the beginning and end - and then form just point out something about how it is written - 1st/2nd person, any personas or rhyme scheme etc..

Wow sorry this was long I hope it helps though!
(Original post by chloerhia)
I've never really revised for Great Expectations- I really enjoy the book so I've read it and annotated so many different copies it is just in my memory really!
But definitely for all of the texts I make REALLY detailed mindmaps on each character and theme, and then plan points you could make in an essay for each of those - as the question style is very much the same each time. So say for An Inspector Calls you could brainstorm 5/6 points you could make about responsibility or Eric etc.. and then you have those in the back of your mind for the exam, which also helps with initial stress/panic in the exam over what to write! Also it may help to go over different key relationships in each text - particularly Shakespeare/Dickens, as these came up in my mocks.

For quotes, if you made the brief essay plan/points you could pick out which quote could go with your point, making that around 5 for each major character/theme, but a lot of quotes are reusable so it may end up less than that! And for the Dickens section you don't always have to quote, you can use references to the text if you don't have an exact quote - for example saying Mrs Joe often hit Pip and Joe, would be sufficient!

Anthology poetry I made my own "revision guide" using class notes instead of the revision guides, as my English teacher said it's to our advantage to write original points instead of what they've seen repeated a lot from the standard revision guides!

For unseen poetry if you're really unsure on what to write, pick interesting, or things that stand out to you from the poems! Structure you can easily focus on the beginning and end - and then form just point out something about how it is written - 1st/2nd person, any personas or rhyme scheme etc..

Wow sorry this was long I hope it helps though!
(Original post by chloerhia)
I've never really revised for Great Expectations- I really enjoy the book so I've read it and annotated so many different copies it is just in my memory really!
But definitely for all of the texts I make REALLY detailed mindmaps on each character and theme, and then plan points you could make in an essay for each of those - as the question style is very much the same each time. So say for An Inspector Calls you could brainstorm 5/6 points you could make about responsibility or Eric etc.. and then you have those in the back of your mind for the exam, which also helps with initial stress/panic in the exam over what to write! Also it may help to go over different key relationships in each text - particularly Shakespeare/Dickens, as these came up in my mocks.

For quotes, if you made the brief essay plan/points you could pick out which quote could go with your point, making that around 5 for each major character/theme, but a lot of quotes are reusable so it may end up less than that! And for the Dickens section you don't always have to quote, you can use references to the text if you don't have an exact quote - for example saying Mrs Joe often hit Pip and Joe, would be sufficient!

Anthology poetry I made my own "revision guide" using class notes instead of the revision guides, as my English teacher said it's to our advantage to write original points instead of what they've seen repeated a lot from the standard revision guides!

For unseen poetry if you're really unsure on what to write, pick interesting, or things that stand out to you from the poems! Structure you can easily focus on the beginning and end - and then form just point out something about how it is written - 1st/2nd person, any personas or rhyme scheme etc..

Wow sorry this was long I hope it helps though!

Hey do you mind to share your mindmaps for great expectations, I've got my mocks this week and it'd be amazinglyy helpful if I could see them x
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chloerhia
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#27
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#27
I so wish I’d kept them to be able to show you but post exam bonfires have no mercy.. If you wanted to message me with the key characters/themes you’re focusing or struggling on I could help you with what ideas I had! x
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Cookiedough202
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#28
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#28
Thanks for the upload do you have any tips on getting a grade 9 in english lang and lit
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1040EZY
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#29
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#29
thats pretty good.Thanks a lot btw
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HarveyHarv_94
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#30
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#30
I'm revising for Macbeth, A Christmas Carol and An Inspector Calls and am absolutely clueless when writing essays as I only seem to write a page of detailed paragraphs but then the rest is just me rambling on about the rest of the novella/play! Any ideas to improve?
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jfdsend
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#31
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this was a grade 8 essay, the question was: Starting with this extract, explore how Shakespeare presents Romeo and Juliet as outsiders to society?In both the extract, and the novel as a whole, Shakespeare uses love, and the strength and conviction of the love between Romeo and Juliet, to present them as outsiders.In the extract, Shakespeare immediately presents the discrepancy between the Petrarchan love Romeo has for Juliet, and ‘young affections’. Romeo’s love is one which he ‘would die’ for; compared to the love he had for Rosalind which was nothing more than an ‘affection’, a friendly acquaintance or teenage melodrama. Shakespeare uses this juxtaposition in order to highlight to the audience the true extent of the love between Romeo and Juliet, and its power and significance by directly contrasting it with a lesser love. The audience begins to question whether they themselves could feel such love, hence presenting Romeo and Juliet as outsiders as they audience can no longer associate themselves with them – the strength of their love makes them unique and different, which isolates them from society from the audiences perspective.Shakespeare uses fate in the rest of the novel to further convey the conviction of the love between Romeo and Juliet, who are ‘star crossed lovers’. Their love was set in stone from the start of the play, and it survived death, feuds and hatred throughout. For the audience, this further highlights the fact that their love is of a different league to any love a member of the audience could feel, it has the power of the ‘star(s)’ and heaven behind it, which isolates Romeo and Juliet. The strength of Romeo and Juliet’s love differentiates them from any member of the audience, or any characters in the play, making them outsiders.The love between Romeo and Juliet is not only portrayed as a ‘passion(ate )’ one, which brings them ‘power’, but a Godly one. Their kiss is ‘by the book’ has the blessing of God and the Bible, giving it not only the strength and ‘power’ of ‘passion’, but the omnipotence of God. Again, the love between Romeo and Juliet is repeatedly presented as one which could never be achieved by any other pair, completely separating them from the masses, and making them outsiders.In the extract love is presented as just as integral to life, as air is. The use of the verb ‘To breathe’ when describing the ‘vows’ of ‘lovers’ indicates to the audience that, for Romeo and Juliet, their love gives them life, it sustains it and gives it longevity just as the oxygen they ‘breathe’. Their love is presented as life, it is given the power to control whether they live or die, like the air. This power shows the audience that their love is consuming – without it life would not exist. Once again, their love is given almost incomprehensible power, which completely separates them from any other character or audience member.Shakespeare uses the contrast between light and dark imagery in order to further present Romeo and Juliet’s power as consuming; Juliet is described as a ‘jewel’ upon and ‘Ethiop’s ear’, their love is a star amidst a dark sky, a beacon, where there is no other. This imagery portrays the love between Romeo and Juliet as one which is so massive it can only be contained by the darkness of an ‘Ethiop’s ear’ yet it has the power to light the darkness with the bright, shimmering surface of a ‘jewel’. To the audience, not does the power of the love between Romeo and Juliet isolate them, but he image of their love standing alone in an empty darkness, just as one would who is an outsider to society.In both the play and the extract, Romeo and Juliet are both idolised; Juliet is as pure as a ‘lamb’ and ‘tender’, and Romeo is ‘beloved’. When love is then described as a ‘charm of looks’, or a result of the characteristics of two people, then the audience can see that it is not only the perfection of Romeo and Juliet which isolate them from the rest of society by putting them on a pedestal, but the isolation stemming from their perfect love, caused by their perfect ‘looks’.I didn't get a 9 because I didn't mention context; e.g. the idea of marriage based on true love would be alien to an Elizebetian society etc.
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annaeban
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#32
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#32
This is one I wrote for comparing poetry (Edexcel literature paper 2 - Conflict poems)
It got 20/20, grade 9.
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1...it?usp=sharing

(I changed the link so should work now)
Last edited by annaeban; 2 months ago
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samisikander
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#33
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#33
Hi can you please accept my request to see the sample answer 🙂
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bhawanabala
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#34
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#34
isn't 6 a B then 7 an A then 8 and A* and finally 9 an A**
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stephsmhb
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#35
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No. Technically there is no a*. 6 is a high B. 7 is an a. 8 is a low a* and 9 is a very very high a *
(Original post by bhawanabala)
isn't 6 a B then 7 an A then 8 and A* and finally 9 an A**
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x_tanzim
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#36
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yeah, you're right
(Original post by bhawanabala)
isn't 6 a B then 7 an A then 8 and A* and finally 9 an A**
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stephsmhb
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#37
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#37
no she's not. A 9 isnt an a**
(Original post by x_tanzim)
yeah, you're right
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Belle Jackson
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#38
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I got a level 9 for this but my teacher is a pretty soft marker: (pride and prejudice 'how does the writer invite sympathy to the protagonist volumes 1
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