Hypocrisy of the Capitalist Right?

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Juan Perón
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I've noticed a hypocrisy around the capitalist right. It seems they are very concerned with free movement of labour and are understandably hostile towards it, as it threatens the cultural cohesion of a nation-state when it is flooded with low-skill alien workers. In the United Kingdom in particular, both UKIP and the Tories, two ostensibly pro-capitalist but anti-mass immigration parties, have embodied this inconsistency among supporters of laissez-faire capitalism.

Yet these same people tend to ignore the damaging effects of free movement of capital, which is just as much of a problem as free movement of labour. In the 1980s the neoliberal Thatcher government privatised many British-owned companies and sold them off to foreigners. This was meant to improve efficiency and lower prices. Yet when it comes to things like the railways or energy, prices are actually higher, thanks to capitalists ripping off the consumer. Rich foreigners are known to buy up expensive houses in London, which pushes up the price of housing further and exacerbates a housing crisis which our country has been facing for years. Our media is controlled, in part, by foreign capital (see Rupert Murdoch), which actively supports these right-wing pro-capitalist parties. Our government has ties to foreign corporations. Yet all our attention is focused on migrant workers and the free movement of labour as opposed to the deleterious effects of free movement of capital.

It's almost as if the Marxist idea of false consciousness applies here. Foreign labour is pitted against domestic labour which works in favour of capitalists as their workers are fighting among themselves rather than uniting against the capitalists who oppress them.

Thoughts?
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Cognition!
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(Original post by Juan Perón)
I've noticed a hypocrisy around the capitalist right. It seems they are very concerned with free movement of labour and are understandably hostile towards it, as it threatens the cultural cohesion of a nation-state when it is flooded with low-skill alien workers. In the United Kingdom in particular, both UKIP and the Tories, two ostensibly pro-capitalist but anti-mass immigration parties, have embodied this inconsistency among supporters of laissez-faire capitalism.

Yet these same people tend to ignore the damaging effects of free movement of capital, which is just as much of a problem as free movement of labour. In the 1980s the neoliberal Thatcher government privatised many British-owned companies and sold them off to foreigners. This was meant to improve efficiency and lower prices. Yet when it comes to things like the railways or energy, prices are actually higher, thanks to capitalists ripping off the consumer. Rich foreigners are known to buy up expensive houses in London, which pushes up the price of housing further and exacerbates a housing crisis which our country has been facing for years. Our media is controlled, in part, by foreign capital (see Rupert Murdoch), which actively supports these right-wing pro-capitalist parties. Our government has ties to foreign corporations. Yet all our attention is focused on migrant workers and the free movement of labour as opposed to the deleterious effects of free movement of capital.

It's almost as if the Marxist idea of false consciousness applies here. Foreign labour is pitted against domestic labour which works in favour of capitalists as their workers are fighting among themselves rather than uniting against the capitalists who oppress them.

Thoughts?
Ah, the four freedoms.

At the end of the day, a party needs popularity in order to stay in power. Deprecating free movement of labour is something far more understandable to much of the electorate than deprecating free movement of capital. Anti-immigrant sentiment runs far higher than anti-corruption sentiment, in all honesty. They target free movement of labour because immigration is something your average voter understands (or thinks they do) on a higher level than the other problems you mention. They do what it takes to maintain their control.

You say that our media is partially controlled by foreign capital: that puts us into a vicious loop in which the points you raise will never be widely publicised, does it not?

Yep, the world is a mess.
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username2228735
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(Original post by Juan Perón)
Yet these same people tend to ignore the damaging effects of free movement of capital, which is just as much of a problem as free movement of labour. In the 1980s the neoliberal Thatcher government privatised many British-owned companies and sold them off to foreigners. This was meant to improve efficiency and lower prices. Yet when it comes to things like the railways or energy, prices are actually higher, thanks to capitalists ripping off the consumer.
This is a far too simplistic view of two very complex industries. You're right to suggest that prices for many railway tickets have gone up, but that is not necessarily true across the board (different fee structures, type of tickets, etc...). Moreover, this ignores inflation.

You also state the 'dangers of the free movement of capital' but don't state what these are. This would be very relevant to the discussion.

(Original post by Juan Perón)
Rich foreigners are known to buy up expensive houses in London, which pushes up the price of housing further and exacerbates a housing crisis which our country has been facing for years. Our media is controlled, in part, by foreign capital (see Rupert Murdoch), which actively supports these right-wing pro-capitalist parties. Our government has ties to foreign corporations. Yet all our attention is focused on migrant workers and the free movement of labour as opposed to the deleterious effects of free movement of capital.
Again, far too simplistic and biased. The facts state that house prices in London are soaring due to a lack of supply; it does not match with escalating demand. Wealthy individuals purchasing properties in prime locations have little or nothing to do with house prices in other areas and foreign ownership outside of a few restricted postcodes is rare.

(Original post by Juan Perón)
It's almost as if the Marxist idea of false consciousness applies here. Foreign labour is pitted against domestic labour which works in favour of capitalists as their workers are fighting among themselves rather than uniting against the capitalists who oppress them.
You haven't shown how.
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Picnic1
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This is why the truth should be told that Margaret Thatcher was not a Conservative in an economic sense of the term. She just happened to be in the Conservative Party. She was a neo-liberal. Because the priority of neo-liberalism is to transfer power from the public sector to the private sector, it is understandable
that she wasn't insistent on changing back comprehensives in to grammar schools because that would mean either making them privately run, which would annoy some people- or making them publically run again which would go against her neo-liberalism. She was a Conservative in a private moral sense of the term. But she tested morality by her policies so she was a cunning pragmatist at creating the very conditions that made people turn to the Conservatives- to appear middle class.
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Ragman75
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You are starting from the wrong premise completely. We are not confused, we just realise that we dont have a free society right now, and that free labour is not moral without a free market.
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Ragman75
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Wtf is ur problem with Lauren, shes hot and smart.
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