Chichaldo
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Hey,

I am revising from http://pmt.physicsandmathstutor.com/...on%20Notes.pdf at present and did the practice integral of https://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?...-4)%5E1%2F2+dx and did it perfectly fine but it seems both aforementioned sources used the original limits instead of the new limits which makes no sense to me as I thought you had to change the limits and use those (which would give an answer of 1,040.2).

Why are they using the original limits of 3 and 4 and not 5 and 12?

Thanks.
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_gcx
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(Original post by Chichaldo)
Hey,

I am revising from http://pmt.physicsandmathstutor.com/...on%20Notes.pdf at present and did the practice integral of https://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?...-4)%5E1%2F2+dx and did it perfectly fine but it seems both aforementioned sources used the original limits instead of the new limits which makes no sense to me as I thought you had to change the limits and use those (which would give an answer of 1,040.2).

Why are they using the original limits of 3 and 4 and not 5 and 12?

Thanks.
Neither source uses the original limits (3 and 4), can explain a bit what you mean?
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RDKGames
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(Original post by Chichaldo)
Hey,

I am revising from http://pmt.physicsandmathstutor.com/...on%20Notes.pdf at present and did the practice integral of https://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?...-4)%5E1%2F2+dx and did it perfectly fine but it seems both aforementioned sources used the original limits instead of the new limits which makes no sense to me as I thought you had to change the limits and use those (which would give an answer of 1,040.2).

Why are they using the original limits of 3 and 4 and not 5 and 12?

Thanks.
You can use the limits of x=3 and x=4 if you revert your integrated function f(u) back into f(x)
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RDKGames
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(Original post by _gcx)
Neither source uses the original limits (3 and 4), can explain a bit what you mean?
Wolfram Alpha does by the looks of it as they I think they revert back into f(x) without showing it.
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Chichaldo
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(Original post by _gcx)
Neither source uses the original limits (3 and 4), can explain a bit what you mean?
(Original post by RDKGames)
You can use the limits of x=3 and x=4 if you revert your integrated function f(u) back into f(x)
Thank you, I was being incredibly stupid and replacing u with u=x^4+1 but still using the limits in terms of u.
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