Physics force question

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purpleicelaif
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#1
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I have a question about forces in my homework. There is a ladder leaned against a wall, but the assumption made is that there is not friction between the ladder and the wall, but there is friction between the ladder and the ground. The only information I have is 2 forces acting on it, a 30N one and a 100N one, and it is asking me to find the weight of the ladder.
Pls help
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RogerOxon
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If you have the normal force at the wall, then you can take moments around the ladder's point of contact with the ground, assuming that the ladder's weight acts at its centre. If that's not what you have, then please post a diagram.
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AspiringUnderdog
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(Original post by purpleicelaif)
I have a question about forces in my homework. There is a ladder leaned against a wall, but the assumption made is that there is not friction between the ladder and the wall, but there is friction between the ladder and the ground. The only information I have is 2 forces acting on it, a 30N one and a 100N one, and it is asking me to find the weight of the ladder.
Pls help
Does it say where those forces are acting? e.g. 2m from the ground. It's most likely a moments question so this is important.

Also, I didn't know that this comes up in physics. I only do this in mechanics 2 for maths. What exam board are you doing?
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purpleicelaif
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(Original post by AspiringUnderdog)
Does it say where those forces are acting? e.g. 2m from the ground. It's most likely a moments question so this is important.

Also, I didn't know that this comes up in physics. I only do this in mechanics 2 for maths. What exam board are you doing?
I don't have distance given nor the mass of the ladder.
I'm doing triple science aqa
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AspiringUnderdog
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(Original post by purpleicelaif)
I don't have distance given nor the mass of the ladder.
I'm doing triple science aqa
Can I see a picture of the question? I thought that this was A level lol.
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purpleicelaif
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(Original post by AspiringUnderdog)
Can I see a picture of the question? I thought that this was A level lol.
thats the question
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RogerOxon
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Apply Newton's first law vertically. You should also be able to see what the frictional force is by applying Newton's first law horizontally.
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AspiringUnderdog
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(Original post by purpleicelaif)
thats the question
Ah okay then you missed out valuable information in your explanation. That is the directions. Forces are vectors.

The ladder is not moving so therefore the forces must have a force in the other direction that makes it equal to 0.

If the upwards force is larger than the downwards it would fly and if the downwards if larger it would fall through the ground.

If this doesn't make sense ask and I'll try to explain further.
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RogerOxon
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#9
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(Original post by purpleicelaif)
thats the question
A minor point, but, by convention, forces are drawn from the point that they act on, so your friction force should start at the base of the ladder and go towards the wall.
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