aislinncumming
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I'm currently in Year 10 and taking French. At my school they say that you must do at least on MFL however there are some girls who have dyslexia etc. that don't have to do this. I'm really struggling and am getting really stressed over French but my mum won't let me drop it despite me explaining how much I struggle.

When in class the teacher will ask a question in French and everyone will reply with such complex answers whereas I don't even know what the teacher asked. I use google translate for my speaking exam write ups because I don't know what to say, and then can't even learn it for the practice exams. ( in the last mock I spent half my time saying ummm because I had forgotten what my answers were.

The school won't test me for dyslexia (although my sister has it) because all my other subjects are okay however I do also struggle in English where I can't place my words and forget what I'm trying to say constantly.

(Sorry I've dragged this out) At my sisters school languages aren't compulsory so I don't understand why I HAVE TO do one , I would still have 9 GCSE's all around A/A* What should I do
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starshine627
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(Original post by aislinncumming)
I'm currently in Year 10 and taking French. At my school they say that you must do at least on MFL however there are some girls who have dyslexia etc. that don't have to do this. I'm really struggling and am getting really stressed over French but my mum won't let me drop it despite me explaining how much I struggle.

When in class the teacher will ask a question in French and everyone will reply with such complex answers whereas I don't even know what the teacher asked. I use google translate for my speaking exam write ups because I don't know what to say, and then can't even learn it for the practice exams. ( in the last mock I spent half my time saying ummm because I had forgotten what my answers were.

The school won't test me for dyslexia (although my sister has it) because all my other subjects are okay however I do also struggle in English where I can't place my words and forget what I'm trying to say constantly.

(Sorry I've dragged this out) At my sisters school languages aren't compulsory so I don't understand why I HAVE TO do one , I would still have 9 GCSE's all around A/A* What should I do
{Sorry,when I started writing this I hadn't meant to leave a whole essay so as a brief summary: don't drop French even if you don't like it and find it difficult, learn stuff by spending hours repeating it over and over and finally see if you can do a foundation course instead if you feel you really cannot cope with a higher level course.}

All schools do subject options differently so don't worry about what is happening at your sister's school, if your school say you have to: (as it sounds like you are currently doing, even if you are unhappy about it) go with it. (It may also be something to do with how they timetable your lessons but again, that's not something you need to be worrying about!) Having an MFL subject does help show colleges/sixth forms/universities you have a certain skill set as French isn't your first language but you have given it a go - you have to be patient, resilient and determined among other things and that is why its a good subject to have. It can also be personally rewarding if you ever find yourself in France or listening to French conversation 'in the real world' as even though you have no clue what is being said, you understand one word or part of a sentence and (I don't know if this is just me but) I feel like I've accomplished something even if its not very big
I'm afraid I don't know much about dyslexia so don't know what to suggest there, but if you can keep up with other subjects then that's great? Get those grades as good as you can and I am sure you will be fine.

Dropping the subject isn't the solution to struggling with the subject. I'm in year 13 now but I did do French at GCSE and I found it really difficult as well - I literally did eenie-meenie-mynee-mo in the reading and listening exams (but this is not something I recommend) - but I did the whole two years and have a certificate to prove it. I started using google translate a lot but was told off for it by my French teacher because apparently what I was handing in was utter nonsense.
The way that I coped with the speaking and writing exams was writing what I wanted to say in English first, keeping it fairly basic so I had half a hope of translating it, then using work we had done in lessons with my physical paperback French dictionary.

The only way I could ever learn my pieces was writing them out over and over. Not writing it out all in one go but doing the first sentence, folding over the paper so I couldn't see it and write it again; fold the paper so you can't see that and write it again, etc. with every sentence then put paragraphs together then you only ever have to write the whole thing out in its entirety a few times. I would do this with speaking and writing but would have to keep re-reading the sentences out loud to practice pronunciation. I know for speaking that my brother learns his pronunciation by writing the words phonetically instead.
My teacher also kindly recorded herself reading my speaking piece so that I could listen to it and learn it by listening too so perhaps you could see if your teacher was willing to do that? If the others in your class seem to understand, get them to practise the repetitions with you.
You didn't specify as to whether or not you are doing a higher or foundation course - if you are doing higher and continue really struggling, would it be a possibility to find out if you can be entered for a foundation course instead? It might make it slightly "easier".

I hope you can take something from this? Sorry if its a bit waffley - I often use a lot of words to say things that could be said using far less characters but hey-ho
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brainzistheword
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(Original post by aislinncumming)
I'm currently in Year 10 and taking French. At my school they say that you must do at least on MFL however there are some girls who have dyslexia etc. that don't have to do this. I'm really struggling and am getting really stressed over French but my mum won't let me drop it despite me explaining how much I struggle.

When in class the teacher will ask a question in French and everyone will reply with such complex answers whereas I don't even know what the teacher asked. I use google translate for my speaking exam write ups because I don't know what to say, and then can't even learn it for the practice exams. ( in the last mock I spent half my time saying ummm because I had forgotten what my answers were.

The school won't test me for dyslexia (although my sister has it) because all my other subjects are okay however I do also struggle in English where I can't place my words and forget what I'm trying to say constantly.

(Sorry I've dragged this out) At my sisters school languages aren't compulsory so I don't understand why I HAVE TO do one , I would still have 9 GCSE's all around A/A* What should I do
Hi there! Sorry this is happening to you.

Have you spoken to your French teacher? I know at our school it wasn't compulsory but languages do help you when employers look at your qualifications. If you are not getting anywhere with the people you explain it to, try taking it higher up if it's such an issue, such as to your headteacher or head of year and see if they can do anything.

I really hope you can get it sorted out but talking and explaining the situation to as many people as possible gives you the best chance of getting it resolved.
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aislinncumming
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Thank you so much
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aislinncumming
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(Original post by starshine627)
{Sorry,when I started writing this I hadn't meant to leave a whole essay so as a brief summary: don't drop French even if you don't like it and find it difficult, learn stuff by spending hours repeating it over and over and finally see if you can do a foundation course instead if you feel you really cannot cope with a higher level course.}

All schools do subject options differently so don't worry about what is happening at your sister's school, if your school say you have to: (as it sounds like you are currently doing, even if you are unhappy about it) go with it. (It may also be something to do with how they timetable your lessons but again, that's not something you need to be worrying about!) Having an MFL subject does help show colleges/sixth forms/universities you have a certain skill set as French isn't your first language but you have given it a go - you have to be patient, resilient and determined among other things and that is why its a good subject to have. It can also be personally rewarding if you ever find yourself in France or listening to French conversation 'in the real world' as even though you have no clue what is being said, you understand one word or part of a sentence and (I don't know if this is just me but) I feel like I've accomplished something even if its not very big
I'm afraid I don't know much about dyslexia so don't know what to suggest there, but if you can keep up with other subjects then that's great? Get those grades as good as you can and I am sure you will be fine.

Dropping the subject isn't the solution to struggling with the subject. I'm in year 13 now but I did do French at GCSE and I found it really difficult as well - I literally did eenie-meenie-mynee-mo in the reading and listening exams (but this is not something I recommend) - but I did the whole two years and have a certificate to prove it. I started using google translate a lot but was told off for it by my French teacher because apparently what I was handing in was utter nonsense.
The way that I coped with the speaking and writing exams was writing what I wanted to say in English first, keeping it fairly basic so I had half a hope of translating it, then using work we had done in lessons with my physical paperback French dictionary.

The only way I could ever learn my pieces was writing them out over and over. Not writing it out all in one go but doing the first sentence, folding over the paper so I couldn't see it and write it again; fold the paper so you can't see that and write it again, etc. with every sentence then put paragraphs together then you only ever have to write the whole thing out in its entirety a few times. I would do this with speaking and writing but would have to keep re-reading the sentences out loud to practice pronunciation. I know for speaking that my brother learns his pronunciation by writing the words phonetically instead.
My teacher also kindly recorded herself reading my speaking piece so that I could listen to it and learn it by listening too so perhaps you could see if your teacher was willing to do that? If the others in your class seem to understand, get them to practise the repetitions with you.
You didn't specify as to whether or not you are doing a higher or foundation course - if you are doing higher and continue really struggling, would it be a possibility to find out if you can be entered for a foundation course instead? It might make it slightly "easier".

I hope you can take something from this? Sorry if its a bit waffley - I often use a lot of words to say things that could be said using far less characters but hey-ho
Thank you for your advice, unfortunately there is no foundation option at school but in particular it's the speaking aspect of the exam I really struggle with because there is so much you have to write in preparation that I forget it all. Thank you 😊
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