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a levels and bias watch

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    hello
    this morning I saw a news programme on television, where two a level students from a girls school in the Midlands achieved SIX a levels, all at grade A.

    my question is this: compared to a student with the average three or four a level qualifications from a comprehensive or grammar school, (at grade A let us presume) is the girls school candidate more favourable for acceptance at a university? is it fair that a private school student, who has been 'trained' by their school to work and achieve in such a way and who may not have the intellectual 'edge' of say, a grammar/comp student, is it fair that they recieve a place over a student like myself, who may not be able to afford such education, yet will work damn hard to achieve the best that there is available. i just dont understand how some students are given the opportunity of studying six a levels....i mean, if the subjects are of the 'vocational' nature, are they not of the same value as more 'traditional' academic subjects. i dont think ive worded this adequately to truely clarify my question, but i supppose social class plays a much larger role in some universities...yes/no????????????? sorry lol
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    all i know is i watched GMTV at 6am today and they had 2 students on there opening their results - and they got CCC and DDD

    i was quite proud of GMTV/the school(in leeds i believe) that they didnt feel the need to have ''super-students'' on there, they just picked normal (maybe average :confused: ) students

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    Grammar schools are not private they are funded by the state and have no fees, you do however have to pass the 11+.

    Public schools often have no entrance exams but you do have to pay a fee.
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    in my local comprehensive sixth form college, i could have done 6 alevels, u can anywhere....5 plus general studies....it depended on ur gcse scored in our college tho....needed 8 a's for them to let u do it
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    State educated students often appear to actually be at a slight advantage over privately educated ones with similar grades when dealing with universities. As far as I'm aware very few people achieve 5/6 As at A-level, and even this is no guarantee of acceptance to university -I've heard of cases where it appears to have worked against unfortunate candidates, where I suspect the institutions they applied to assumed they were Oxbridge candidates so rejected them.
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    That reminds me of the whole Bristol admissions policy debate.

    As you probably know, Bristol in their effort to "widen participation" take the background of students into account and may offer lower grades to people who, for example, went to a state school in an inner city area with a bad reputation. Whilst they might ask for higher grades from someone who went to a private school. (For instance I went to a state school in a city with a bad reputation, I got an offer of CCC from bristol, even though I was expected (and got) AAA at a-level)

    There's been loads of debating about this, I'm sure it's been discussed a lot here. Basically some people say that Bristol (and universities like it) are "dumbing down" and losing prestige because they're setting lower entry requirements and accepting students from poorer areas more easily.
    However, then there are the people that consider Bristols policy to be correct. That they should take a students background into account (Isn't it more impressive to get AAA from a school with a very bad record than a private school? But then again, what about the poor private school pupil who got AAA - maybe they would have got AAA at a state school too?)

    Bristol claim that all they want is the best students no matter where they come from. Which, if true, I don't think anyone can disagree with.

    Therefore in my opinion, the background or "social class" as you put it, should be considered. Maybe not in AAA cases, because there's no way of knowing if the private school pupil who got AAA would have done just as well if they'd come from a state school.
    But in cases where a university has two student, both got ABB but one went to an inner-city state school and one went to a private/grammar school, both equal in terms of GCSE's, A-levels, Personal Statement, etc. Then maybe the state school student should get the place. Because they've achieved ABB in what is arguably a harder more disdvantaged background compared to the person who went to a "better" school, yet still only got the same grades. (In my opinion, if I was the admissions tutor, I'd give the place to the state school student)

    I went off on a bit of a rant there, but I hope I managed to keep it fairly within the topic!

    Just my opinion.
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    I totally agree with you
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    (Original post by Loveintheasylum)
    hello
    this morning I saw a news programme on television, where two a level students from a girls school in the Midlands achieved SIX a levels, all at grade A.

    my question is this: compared to a student with the average three or four a level qualifications from a comprehensive or grammar school, (at grade A let us presume) is the girls school candidate more favourable for acceptance at a university? is it fair that a private school student, who has been 'trained' by their school to work and achieve in such a way and who may not have the intellectual 'edge' of say, a grammar/comp student, is it fair that they recieve a place over a student like myself, who may not be able to afford such education, yet will work damn hard to achieve the best that there is available. i just dont understand how some students are given the opportunity of studying six a levels....i mean, if the subjects are of the 'vocational' nature, are they not of the same value as more 'traditional' academic subjects. i dont think ive worded this adequately to truely clarify my question, but i supppose social class plays a much larger role in some universities...yes/no????????????? sorry lol
    She might have six alevels, but probably less than that many friends.
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    (Original post by sparkler)
    the school(in leeds i believe)
    can you remember the name of it by any chance?
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    The school in the origional post was Wolverhampton Girls', It's not a private school but is selective. To get in you have to pass their own exam.

    I'm sure there is a member on here who goes/did go there they could probably tell us a bit more about it.
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    My sister used to go there - they get a 100% Pass rate in A-Levels every year and you're correct, you have to pass an entrance exam to get a place there.
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    (Original post by Loveintheasylum)
    i just dont understand how some students are given the opportunity of studying six a levels
    Having your course discussions with someone who has a strange faith in your ability usually helps. I persuaded my college to let me do 5 A2 and an AS just by asking if I could. Admittely one is general studies but still, people wanting to do more should just ask their school or college. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by scottyoneill)
    in my local comprehensive sixth form college, i could have done 6 alevels, u can anywhere....5 plus general studies....it depended on ur gcse scored in our college tho....needed 8 a's for them to let u do it
    You couldn't in our school cus of the way the lessons were timetabled. You could do 4 + General Studies.
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    Well I could onlly do 4, despite going to a private girls school, because otherwise the subjects can't be timetabled. Unfair, I'd have liked to do another one.
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    you could do 3 A levels in my school,

    (4 if you did Further maths, but to do this you had to pass GCSE maths in year 10)

    i did 2. and stil couldnt get higher than a C in physics with the teaching i got. but at least i got a teacher <those who did biology aint had a teacher since december>

    the worst thing i think it whilst all the papers are reporting record nubmer of a grades, on some random page with one line on it the independent reports "There is a rise of 5.4% in those eligible for clearing this year on last, that is over 83,000 students "

    that is one hell of a lot of kids failing to achieve their potential.

    love Katy***
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    why bother stretching yourself to do 5 or 6 a-levels when three are perfectly adequate to get you to university and perhaps could be covered more thoroughly. maybe some people spread themselves too thinly? (no disrespect to anyone who has got more than 3 a-levels)
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    (Original post by minx)
    why bother stretching yourself to do 5 or 6 a-levels when three are perfectly adequate to get you to university and perhaps could be covered more thoroughly. maybe some people spread themselves too thinly? (no disrespect to anyone who has got more than 3 a-levels)
    I dare anyone to tell me that I don't have a thorough knowledge of Electonics or Computing. I did 5 A2 and an AS but I don't think that I spread myself too thinly at all. At the end of the day if you have an interest in the subjects you study then you WILL strive to acquire a broad knowledge of them and thus you WILL do well in them. If some people have an interest in a multiplicity of subjects then why not take them all on?!? :confused: Admittely I'm not the best History student in the world but I like learning the material and I would have been happy with any grade because I enjoyed doing it. We should stop thinking of A-Levels as university entrance exams and try and enjoy them for what they are.
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    (Original post by scottyoneill)
    i could have done 6 alevels, u can anywhere
    Or not, as the case may be! :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Pencil Queen)
    Or a hell of a lot more teachers overestimating their students potential

    Either way it's bad news...
    Or... students putting pressure on some teachers to 'just put my grade up by one... I'll really, really work hard!!!'
    Get real. Most people's (not all, admittedly) A2 grades are very closely related to their AS performance. I have done a correlation over the last 4 years and the students can see what results were obtained by people achieving their AS UMS score, so there is rarely an argument and usually I'm correct in my predictions.
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    (Original post by Geogger)
    Or... students putting pressure on some teachers to 'just put my grade up by one... I'll really, really work hard!!!'
    Get real. Most people's (not all, admittedly) A2 grades are very closely related to their AS performance. I have done a correlation over the last 4 years and the students can see what results were obtained by people achieving their AS UMS score, so there is rarely an argument and usually I'm correct in my predictions.

    what students have you studied?? coz sure as hell you aint studied any of the students i know.

    love Katy***
 
 
 
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