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Declining number of physics a-level students - good or bad? watch

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    Does it mean that physics will die out? surely not!
    I'm only a GCSE student and i will be taking physics at a-level because I find it interesting and is very relevent in our world.
    What does everyone think?
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    Anyone else have any comments?
    Surely if this trend continues, doing physics at university should be easy to get into, they will beg people to do it - how these people can do media studies, dance, music and other mickey mouse subjects I don't know - everyone who does science and maths are clear thinkers because these are the most relevent to our society - where would you be without hospitals, antibiotics, engineering?
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    (Original post by Invisible)
    Physics is the best.

    You must understand this.
    Yep, many people haven't yet realised this!

    The situation certainley is favourable if you're a potential undergraduate, most universities I went to had open days with nice food (for us and our parents) and gave a good tour of the department, a chance for a one on one chat and often things like sample lectures. Also many offer grants if you get good grades.

    But yeah, in the bigger context of things it isn't good, it's sad that people can't see how wonderful it is! Relevance to society isn't why I like physics though, it's more some of the abstract concepts of how the universe works and the like that I think makes it really interesting. Of course there's side that's relevant to society as well though, plasma physics in fusion (or is that fission?) reactors and the like could be very important in the future, which is also interesting on it's own.
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    Some very successful physicists trained in Maths initially, not Physics. Also, a lot of people who study Physics turn to other fields (anything from accounting to writing)...so a decrease in A-level students may not make that much of a difference.
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    It's just a side effect of having more choice more than anything else.
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    (Original post by Widowmaker)
    Does it mean that physics will die out? surely not!
    I'm only a GCSE student and i will be taking physics at a-level because I find it interesting and is very relevent in our world.
    What does everyone think?
    yay
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    im crap at physics, i got U
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    I think it's good, because I'm going to be doing it next year and it will make me look better next to people who do things that are increasingly common like media studies, (don't get offended, I'm not saying it's a bad subject, I'm only stating the truth...)

    As Shiny said the only reason is that there are more subjects, it's a great subject and many people know that, it's not going to die out.
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    its a lot harder at A level, so i wouldnt take it unless you are pretty good at it or like it so much u will work very hard!
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    I think physics is ok, but for people who dont understand it, or find it difficult, its much better to do something else they enjoy rather than, just go for how good it looks on their uni application.

    Media Studies, sociology, psychology and so on.. may be branded as mickey mouse subjects.. but a lot of the business orientated degree's at LSE have topics such as Gender and Society, and those that are related to sociology. In fact, i know a lady who studied at the worst university on the league tables, who now tutor's prospective students who want to study Sociology at LSE.

    Degree's and A-levels are becoming worthless these days, and theres a demand for skilled workers rather than graduates, but after the top-up fees get introduced, all that could change. If you do a degree in science, or something specific which is accredited - like Accounting (ACCA), HR (CIPD) and so on.. then its well worth it. But many people, who attend LSE, Kings College etc, find it difficult to find jobs because employers also stress the need for experience - not just academic qualifications. So if you do physics and not media studies, all thats affected is your uni application, and not much else in my view.

    Its always good to have a mix, and not just have humanities, or sciences. A bit of the old, and the new is good.
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    Physics Rules! will hopefully be starting physics degree next year! just got A in AS physics but 1 mark off A in maths ! are physics degrees very competitive to get onto anymore???
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    (Original post by thunderstorm)
    its a lot harder at A level, so i wouldnt take it unless you are pretty good at it or like it so much u will work very hard!
    I do like it, and am quite good at it, I'll work hardest in physics since it's the hardest subject that I'll be doing and I hope I can get an A for it.
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    i really like physics, shame i have a shite teacher. god knows how i got 119/120 in unit three having had like two lessons on practicals.
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    Physics is a very interesting subject, yet I struggled with it for a long time at a level (fortunately got my A though)

    The problem is its just too hard for some people to get their heads around, and not many degree courses require physics a-level anymore (just subjects such as engineering as far as i know)
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    I might do engineering, or I might just specialise in one of the sciences.
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    I'm going to be starting physics a level in September.
 
 
 

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