would this be a suitable answer for a Jane Eyre Extract Question

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elintuckx
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#1
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#1
would this answer be sufficient for a good mark in the AS English literature exam on the Jane Eyre Extract?
(i) Examine how Bronte presents Jane as a symbol of feminism in this extract.

‘I grieve to leave Thornfield: I love Thornfield – I love it, because I have lived in it a full and delightful life, – momentarily at least. I have not been trampled on. I have not been petrified. I have not been buried with inferior minds, and excluded from every glimpse of communion with what is bright and energetic, and high. I have talked, face to face, with what I reverence; with what I delight in, – with an original, a vigorous, an expanded mind. I have known you, Mr Rochester; and it strikes me with terror and anguish to feel I absolutely must be torn from you for ever. I see the necessity of departure; and it is like looking on the necessity of death.’ ‘Where do you see the necessity?’ he asked, suddenly. ‘Where? You, sir, have placed it before me.’ ‘In what shape?’ ‘In the shape of Miss Ingram; a noble and beautiful woman, – your bride.’ ‘My bride! What bride? I have no bride!’ ‘But you will have.’ ‘Yes: – I will! I will!’ He set his teeth. ‘Then I must go: – you have said it yourself.’ ‘No: you must stay! I swear it – and the oath shall be kept.’ ‘I tell you I must go!’ I retorted, roused to something like passion. ‘Do you think I can stay to become nothing to you? Do you think I am an automaton? – A machine without feelings? And can bear to have my morsel of bread snatched from my lips, and my drop of living water dashed from my cup? Do you think, because I am poor, obscure, plain, and little, I am soulless and heartless? You think wrong! – I have as much soul as you –and full as much heart! And if God had gifted me with some beauty, and much wealth, I should have made it as hard for you to leave me, as it is now for me to leave you. I am not talking to you now through the medium of custom, conventionalities, nor even of mortal flesh: – it is my spirit that addresses your spirit; just as if both had passed through the grave, and we stood at God's feet, equal – as we are!’

In this extract Jane Eyre can be seen as a symbol of feminism as she is strong willed and speaks her mind to Mr Rochester even though he is of a higher status to her and a male. “equal-as we are!” the word equal connotes how Jane does not define equality through status or gender the tone in which she speaks this is very authoritative and outspoken proving that she is empowered by herself and is proud of her feminist qualities and traits. Jane in this extract is very questioning and intimidating she is aware of what she wants and is not afraid to vocalise this “do you think I am an automaton?” the stylistic language “automaton” emphasises Jane’s intellect and she is not afraid to display her intelligence Jane also questions Rochester here to show him that she too has feelings that should be outward spoken which displays her feminist traits and her drive for female empowerment. In this extract Jane has a power over Rochester and this can be seen within the line lengths, Jane speaks significantly more than Rochester which displays that she has removed the inequality between them and demands to be listened to rather than be submissive to him because he is her “inferior” it is also evident that within the lines where Rochester does speak Jane interrupts showing that she is independent and her own free will still. “I tell you I must go” the use of the imperative “must” suggests Jane’s urgency to be free and furthermore her fiery and feminist spirit she is unwilling to falter at Rochester’s demands and shows him that she too can be powerful just through her language and intelligence, she meets Rochester’s aggression with a rational approach and shows him that she will not be controlled by a man “I have as much soul as you- and full as much heart” it is apparent that Jane knows of her internal strength and is unwilling to lose that part of herself for someone else which clearly displays her feministic features, the use of the word “soul” connotes that Jane looks beneath the surface of gender and social status and shows awareness that everyone can be equal on the inside no matter of what social background or what gender they are making her truly a symbol of feminism especially that of a modern setting.
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#2
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#2
(Original post by elintuckx)
would this answer be sufficient for a good mark in the AS English literature exam on the Jane Eyre Extract?
(i) Examine how Bronte presents Jane as a symbol of feminism in this extract.

‘I grieve to leave Thornfield: I love Thornfield – I love it, because I have lived in it a full and delightful life, – momentarily at least. I have not been trampled on. I have not been petrified. I have not been buried with inferior minds, and excluded from every glimpse of communion with what is bright and energetic, and high. I have talked, face to face, with what I reverence; with what I delight in, – with an original, a vigorous, an expanded mind. I have known you, Mr Rochester; and it strikes me with terror and anguish to feel I absolutely must be torn from you for ever. I see the necessity of departure; and it is like looking on the necessity of death.’ ‘Where do you see the necessity?’ he asked, suddenly. ‘Where? You, sir, have placed it before me.’ ‘In what shape?’ ‘In the shape of Miss Ingram; a noble and beautiful woman, – your bride.’ ‘My bride! What bride? I have no bride!’ ‘But you will have.’ ‘Yes: – I will! I will!’ He set his teeth. ‘Then I must go: – you have said it yourself.’ ‘No: you must stay! I swear it – and the oath shall be kept.’ ‘I tell you I must go!’ I retorted, roused to something like passion. ‘Do you think I can stay to become nothing to you? Do you think I am an automaton? – A machine without feelings? And can bear to have my morsel of bread snatched from my lips, and my drop of living water dashed from my cup? Do you think, because I am poor, obscure, plain, and little, I am soulless and heartless? You think wrong! – I have as much soul as you –and full as much heart! And if God had gifted me with some beauty, and much wealth, I should have made it as hard for you to leave me, as it is now for me to leave you. I am not talking to you now through the medium of custom, conventionalities, nor even of mortal flesh: – it is my spirit that addresses your spirit; just as if both had passed through the grave, and we stood at God's feet, equal – as we are!’

In this extract Jane Eyre can be seen as a symbol of feminism as she is strong willed and speaks her mind to Mr Rochester even though he is of a higher status to her and a male. “equal-as we are!” the word equal connotes how Jane does not define equality through status or gender the tone in which she speaks this is very authoritative and outspoken proving that she is empowered by herself and is proud of her feminist qualities and traits. Jane in this extract is very questioning and intimidating she is aware of what she wants and is not afraid to vocalise this “do you think I am an automaton?” the stylistic language “automaton” emphasises Jane’s intellect and she is not afraid to display her intelligence Jane also questions Rochester here to show him that she too has feelings that should be outward spoken which displays her feminist traits and her drive for female empowerment. In this extract Jane has a power over Rochester and this can be seen within the line lengths, Jane speaks significantly more than Rochester which displays that she has removed the inequality between them and demands to be listened to rather than be submissive to him because he is her “inferior” it is also evident that within the lines where Rochester does speak Jane interrupts showing that she is independent and her own free will still. “I tell you I must go” the use of the imperative “must” suggests Jane’s urgency to be free and furthermore her fiery and feminist spirit she is unwilling to falter at Rochester’s demands and shows him that she too can be powerful just through her language and intelligence, she meets Rochester’s aggression with a rational approach and shows him that she will not be controlled by a man “I have as much soul as you- and full as much heart” it is apparent that Jane knows of her internal strength and is unwilling to lose that part of herself for someone else which clearly displays her feministic features, the use of the word “soul” connotes that Jane looks beneath the surface of gender and social status and shows awareness that everyone can be equal on the inside no matter of what social background or what gender they are making her truly a symbol of feminism especially that of a modern setting.
This looks good. However, I would hesitate to overdo the equality commentary, because at the beginning of the excerpt Jane refers to "inferior minds", indicating that she does view herself as superior to some (in an intellectual respect, at least). It seems that she does view herself as equal to Mr. Rochester, but perhaps not to all. After all, she clearly has great self-worth and self-respect, as evidenced by how she refuses to "become nothing" to Mr Rochester.

A really uplifting read, though
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gilmorelove
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#3
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#3
Really good read- great use of language techniques and description words
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