elintuckx
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would this be a suitable answer for a Dr faustus question on black magic and necromancy?
Marlowe’s dramatic use of magic and necromancy is what is most appealing to audiences examine this view of Dr Faustus
Black magic and necromancy is constantly mentioned and displayed throughout Dr Faustus and during the renaissance many magical practises and rituals were considered evil and irreligious moreover black magic has been referred to the use of supernatural powers for evil and selfish purposes. Marlowe by showing a physical representation of black magic and necromancy through the character of Faustus educates and informs the audience of the consequences of practicing black magic and necromancy.
It is evident that Faustus’ hamartia is what causes him to fall into black magic and his desire for power and knowledge sees him calling up Mephostophilis in order to aid his quest. The dramatic use of magic and necromancy would be most appealing to audiences because at the time Dr Faustus was written no morality play would have shown hell nor the use of black magic so it was both visually pleasing especially to the groundlings and moreover insightful. The way in which Faustus neglects divinity and strives for the art of black magic would have been shocking to an audience “necromantic books are heavenly” this statement was particularly Blasphemous and audience watching/ reading this would have been intrigued to see what would happen once someone defies god in particular Elizabethan audiences would have felt a mixture of shock, fear and excitement when Lucifer, Mephostophilis and Beelzebub appear which would engage them into the supernatural element of the play. Marlowe presents the black magic that Faustus has to be nothing but trickery and shows, however this would have entertained the audience especially the groundlings as they would have understood the tomfoolery that was going on, on stage, however a modern audience may interpret these scenes as making a mockery of black magic and it can be seen as Marlowe’s subliminal message that necromancy and black magic is foolish and is only to please the mind of the practiser. The use of dark magic and necromancy within Faustus is also to put on a spectacle and please the audience through marvellous imagery such as the personified versions of the seven deadly sins would have been a splendid sight for audiences however before this show it is evident that Mephostophilis is showing these sights to ease Faustus’ mind and stray him away from religion “ill fetch him somewhat to delight his mind” this can be seen as Marlowe’s warning to the audience that black magic can be tempting as it looks appealing and delightful but it should not tempt you away from God and religion. It can also be seen that even Faustus is appalled and horrified by the appearance of the devils “thou art too ugly to attend on me” this Can be seen as ironic as Faustus is being greedy about his power it is also ambivalent and it is evident that he is repelled but even this doesn’t persuade him to repent.
On the contrary to this the real appeal of the play can be seen as Faustus’ tragic fate and vacillating mind and soul as once he sells his soul to Lucifer he instantly thinks of repenting, in this sense the dramatic use of magic is almost incidental to the real story of Faustus’ internal struggle with himself which Marlowe intended not as a fantastical battle but that of a realistic portrayal of a human being divided between good and evil. The internal confliction between religion would have been quite common during the renaissance period as science and more intellectual reasoning became a lot more popular and many people including Marlowe himself would have been dissuaded from religion, however Faustus’ tragic fate would have been most appealing to audiences as they would have been aware of the downfall they would face if they followed the same path as Faustus “his waxen wings did mount above his reach” this can be interpreted as Marlowe showing that aiming too high will cause a large downfall which ultimately can be argued as the plays greatest appeal. “Faustus is the living, struggling natural, personal man” (Taine H.A history of English Literature) the way in which Marlowe portrays Faustus not only following Aristotle’s tragic hero but he also demonstrates some of humanities hamartia’s such as gluttony and a hunger for power which is arguably the main point Marlowe is trying to establish throughout the play and the magic and necromancy only adds as a spectacle towards the audience highlighting the morals within the play.
Referring back to the original question even though the use of black magic and necromancy is appealing to the audience and gives them images of hell and dark magic that they would never have seen ultimately the most appealing aspect of the play would be the downfall of Faustus himself and his internal confliction between good and evil as it acts as a reminder to the renaissance audience to remain faithful to god or face the same consequences as Faustus “cut is the branch that might have grown full” with black magic hand in hand Faustus was wasted potential and the visual of hell and necromancy adds to this message and undoubtedly appeals to the audience both modern and past.
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TSR Jessica
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04MR17
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(Original post by elintuckx)
would this be a suitable answer for a Dr faustus question on black magic and necromancy?
Marlowe’s dramatic use of magic and necromancy is what is most appealing to audiences examine this view of Dr Faustus
Black magic and necromancy is constantly mentioned and displayed throughout Dr Faustus and during the renaissance many magical practises and rituals were considered evil and irreligious moreover black magic has been referred to the use of supernatural powers for evil and selfish purposes. Marlowe by showing a physical representation of black magic and necromancy through the character of Faustus educates and informs the audience of the consequences of practicing black magic and necromancy.
It is evident that Faustus’ hamartia is what causes him to fall into black magic and his desire for power and knowledge sees him calling up Mephostophilis in order to aid his quest. The dramatic use of magic and necromancy would be most appealing to audiences because at the time Dr Faustus was written no morality play would have shown hell nor the use of black magic so it was both visually pleasing especially to the groundlings and moreover insightful. The way in which Faustus neglects divinity and strives for the art of black magic would have been shocking to an audience “necromantic books are heavenly” this statement was particularly Blasphemous and audience watching/ reading this would have been intrigued to see what would happen once someone defies god in particular Elizabethan audiences would have felt a mixture of shock, fear and excitement when Lucifer, Mephostophilis and Beelzebub appear which would engage them into the supernatural element of the play. Marlowe presents the black magic that Faustus has to be nothing but trickery and shows, however this would have entertained the audience especially the groundlings as they would have understood the tomfoolery that was going on, on stage, however a modern audience may interpret these scenes as making a mockery of black magic and it can be seen as Marlowe’s subliminal message that necromancy and black magic is foolish and is only to please the mind of the practiser. The use of dark magic and necromancy within Faustus is also to put on a spectacle and please the audience through marvellous imagery such as the personified versions of the seven deadly sins would have been a splendid sight for audiences however before this show it is evident that Mephostophilis is showing these sights to ease Faustus’ mind and stray him away from religion “ill fetch him somewhat to delight his mind” this can be seen as Marlowe’s warning to the audience that black magic can be tempting as it looks appealing and delightful but it should not tempt you away from God and religion. It can also be seen that even Faustus is appalled and horrified by the appearance of the devils “thou art too ugly to attend on me” this Can be seen as ironic as Faustus is being greedy about his power it is also ambivalent and it is evident that he is repelled but even this doesn’t persuade him to repent.
On the contrary to this the real appeal of the play can be seen as Faustus’ tragic fate and vacillating mind and soul as once he sells his soul to Lucifer he instantly thinks of repenting, in this sense the dramatic use of magic is almost incidental to the real story of Faustus’ internal struggle with himself which Marlowe intended not as a fantastical battle but that of a realistic portrayal of a human being divided between good and evil. The internal confliction between religion would have been quite common during the renaissance period as science and more intellectual reasoning became a lot more popular and many people including Marlowe himself would have been dissuaded from religion, however Faustus’ tragic fate would have been most appealing to audiences as they would have been aware of the downfall they would face if they followed the same path as Faustus “his waxen wings did mount above his reach” this can be interpreted as Marlowe showing that aiming too high will cause a large downfall which ultimately can be argued as the plays greatest appeal. “Faustus is the living, struggling natural, personal man” (Taine H.A history of English Literature) the way in which Marlowe portrays Faustus not only following Aristotle’s tragic hero but he also demonstrates some of humanities hamartia’s such as gluttony and a hunger for power which is arguably the main point Marlowe is trying to establish throughout the play and the magic and necromancy only adds as a spectacle towards the audience highlighting the morals within the play.
Referring back to the original question even though the use of black magic and necromancy is appealing to the audience and gives them images of hell and dark magic that they would never have seen ultimately the most appealing aspect of the play would be the downfall of Faustus himself and his internal confliction between good and evil as it acts as a reminder to the renaissance audience to remain faithful to god or face the same consequences as Faustus “cut is the branch that might have grown full” with black magic hand in hand Faustus was wasted potential and the visual of hell and necromancy adds to this message and undoubtedly appeals to the audience both modern and past.
What spec and attach mark scheme please.
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auburnstar
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I'm just going to go ahead and assume you're doing Edexcel so using the marking criteria for that (other exam boards function similarly).

AO1 (write well, use key terms):
- The grammar is a little faulty here, mostly with regards to conjugating certain verbs and making sure number agreement is correct (eg 'Black magic and necromancy are constantly mentioned' not is).
- Quotes need to be embedded into the argument. As it stands your quotes sort of sit on their own eg “ill fetch him somewhat to delight his mind” this can be seen as Marlowe’s warning (note also ill should be I'll). Rather than just state the quote, you need to embed it like so: Mephistopheles' desire to distance Faustus from religious piety is clear when he states '[I'll] fetch him something to delight his mind'. (boxes because personal pronoun and the actual quote is something not somewhat)

AO2 (playwright's methods -> effect on audience)
- Your analysis could be more in-depth. Follow simple pattern Method - Effect - Significance. "Marlowe uses a chiastic structure for example which emphasises his eponymous character's struggle. This is illustrated in [explain how chiastic structure is used, give textual examples and references and analyse them]. This is significant as it places Faustus' struggle at the centre of the play, perhaps bolstering the argument that rather than debate the good or evil of magic, Marlowe is primarily concerned with addressing the nature of the human psyche." One paragraph I just wrote following that structure.
- This is a play -> what are the dramatic features? what about Faustus' opening or ending soliloquy (the latter in particular dramatising his internal struggle and perhaps undermining its significance or increasing our sympathy [esp as modern readers] towards him)?

AO3 (socio/political/historical context)
- Your context points are rather generalised and vague eg "during the renaissance many magical practises and rituals were considered evil and irreligious". What evidence do you have to support this? It's not a history essay but something along the lines of 'Although James I was rumoured to practice witchcraft, to Marlowe's pious religious society in general, actions such as paganism and magical ritual were considered evil and irreligious.'

AO5 (critical views) - applies only to AS not A2 Faustus
- You quote a critical view “Faustus is the living, struggling natural, personal man” but don't seem to evaluate whether the critic is right or not. Is Faustus really struggling or is this self-dramatisation? Is he the victim of a vengeful God, cruel fate or his obsession with magic in a time where this was deeply frowned upon?

Could you consider some more points? The paganist/ritualised nature of his "lines and circles" and vow to practise "cursed necromancy"? Marlowe presenting a parody of religious ceremony such as the blood in his pact with Mephistopheles - blood being a symbol of Christ (thereby linking magic with rejection of God). Is magic merely a vehicle for Faustus' puerile desires? Through his actions (boxing the pope an ear, turning a knight into a stag), which fall short of Faustus' grandiose attractive and ambitious expectations in his opening soliloquy, we arguably see that he is more concerned with using magic for his own childish whim than becoming a "mighty God".

Tl;dr
- Fix the grammar if possible
- Embed your quotations
- Give more detailed analysis
- Remember this is a play and the significance of that in the dramatic presentation of magic
- Less vague with regards to context
- Evaluate critical views
- Avoid "run on" sentences by using full stops and commas (long paragraphs = hard to read)

Sorry to ramble and I hope this doesn't come across as too harsh haha.
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Doones
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(Original post by elintuckx)
would this be a suitable answer for a Dr faustus question on black magic and necromancy?
Marlowe’s dramatic use of magic and necromancy is what is most appealing to audiences examine this view of Dr Faustus
Black magic and necromancy is constantly mentioned and displayed throughout Dr Faustus and during the renaissance many magical practises and rituals were considered evil and irreligious moreover black magic has been referred to the use of supernatural powers for evil and selfish purposes. Marlowe by showing a physical representation of black magic and necromancy through the character of Faustus educates and informs the audience of the consequences of practicing black magic and necromancy.
It is evident that Faustus’ hamartia is what causes him to fall into black magic and his desire for power and knowledge sees him calling up Mephostophilis in order to aid his quest. The dramatic use of magic and necromancy would be most appealing to audiences because at the time Dr Faustus was written no morality play would have shown hell nor the use of black magic so it was both visually pleasing especially to the groundlings and moreover insightful. The way in which Faustus neglects divinity and strives for the art of black magic would have been shocking to an audience “necromantic books are heavenly” this statement was particularly Blasphemous and audience watching/ reading this would have been intrigued to see what would happen once someone defies god in particular Elizabethan audiences would have felt a mixture of shock, fear and excitement when Lucifer, Mephostophilis and Beelzebub appear which would engage them into the supernatural element of the play. Marlowe presents the black magic that Faustus has to be nothing but trickery and shows, however this would have entertained the audience especially the groundlings as they would have understood the tomfoolery that was going on, on stage, however a modern audience may interpret these scenes as making a mockery of black magic and it can be seen as Marlowe’s subliminal message that necromancy and black magic is foolish and is only to please the mind of the practiser. The use of dark magic and necromancy within Faustus is also to put on a spectacle and please the audience through marvellous imagery such as the personified versions of the seven deadly sins would have been a splendid sight for audiences however before this show it is evident that Mephostophilis is showing these sights to ease Faustus’ mind and stray him away from religion “ill fetch him somewhat to delight his mind” this can be seen as Marlowe’s warning to the audience that black magic can be tempting as it looks appealing and delightful but it should not tempt you away from God and religion. It can also be seen that even Faustus is appalled and horrified by the appearance of the devils “thou art too ugly to attend on me” this Can be seen as ironic as Faustus is being greedy about his power it is also ambivalent and it is evident that he is repelled but even this doesn’t persuade him to repent.
On the contrary to this the real appeal of the play can be seen as Faustus’ tragic fate and vacillating mind and soul as once he sells his soul to Lucifer he instantly thinks of repenting, in this sense the dramatic use of magic is almost incidental to the real story of Faustus’ internal struggle with himself which Marlowe intended not as a fantastical battle but that of a realistic portrayal of a human being divided between good and evil. The internal confliction between religion would have been quite common during the renaissance period as science and more intellectual reasoning became a lot more popular and many people including Marlowe himself would have been dissuaded from religion, however Faustus’ tragic fate would have been most appealing to audiences as they would have been aware of the downfall they would face if they followed the same path as Faustus “his waxen wings did mount above his reach” this can be interpreted as Marlowe showing that aiming too high will cause a large downfall which ultimately can be argued as the plays greatest appeal. “Faustus is the living, struggling natural, personal man” (Taine H.A history of English Literature) the way in which Marlowe portrays Faustus not only following Aristotle’s tragic hero but he also demonstrates some of humanities hamartia’s such as gluttony and a hunger for power which is arguably the main point Marlowe is trying to establish throughout the play and the magic and necromancy only adds as a spectacle towards the audience highlighting the morals within the play.
Referring back to the original question even though the use of black magic and necromancy is appealing to the audience and gives them images of hell and dark magic that they would never have seen ultimately the most appealing aspect of the play would be the downfall of Faustus himself and his internal confliction between good and evil as it acts as a reminder to the renaissance audience to remain faithful to god or face the same consequences as Faustus “cut is the branch that might have grown full” with black magic hand in hand Faustus was wasted potential and the visual of hell and necromancy adds to this message and undoubtedly appeals to the audience both modern and past.
Moved to English Study Help


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AllanSmith22
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(Original post by elintuckx)
would this be a suitable answer for a Dr faustus question on black magic and necromancy?
Marlowe’s dramatic use of magic and necromancy is what is most appealing to audiences examine this view of Dr Faustus
Black magic and necromancy is constantly mentioned and displayed throughout Dr Faustus and during the renaissance many magical practises and rituals were considered evil and irreligious moreover black magic has been referred to the use of supernatural powers for evil and selfish purposes. Marlowe by showing a physical representation of black magic and necromancy through the character of Faustus educates and informs the audience of the consequences of practicing black magic and necromancy.
It is evident that Faustus’ hamartia is what causes him to fall into black magic and his desire for power and knowledge sees him calling up Mephostophilis in order to aid his quest. The dramatic use of magic and necromancy would be most appealing to audiences because at the time Dr Faustus was written no morality play would have shown hell nor the use of black magic so it was both visually pleasing especially to the groundlings and moreover insightful. The way in which Faustus neglects divinity and strives for the art of black magic would have been shocking to an audience “necromantic books are heavenly” this statement was particularly Blasphemous and audience watching/ reading this would have been intrigued to see what would happen once someone defies god in particular Elizabethan audiences would have felt a mixture of shock, fear and excitement when Lucifer, Mephostophilis and Beelzebub appear which would engage them into the supernatural element of the play. Marlowe presents the black magic that Faustus has to be nothing but trickery and shows, however this would have entertained the audience especially the groundlings as they would have understood the tomfoolery that was going on, on stage, however a modern audience may interpret these scenes as making a mockery of black magic and it can be seen as Marlowe’s subliminal message that necromancy and black magic is foolish and is only to please the mind of the practiser. The use of dark magic and necromancy within Faustus is also to put on a spectacle and please the audience through marvellous imagery such as the personified versions of the seven deadly sins would have been a splendid sight for audiences however before this show it is evident that Mephostophilis is showing these sights to ease Faustus’ mind and stray him away from religion “ill fetch him somewhat to delight his mind” this can be seen as Marlowe’s warning to the audience that black magic can be tempting as it looks appealing and delightful but it should not tempt you away from God and religion. It can also be seen that even Faustus is appalled and horrified by the appearance of the devils “thou art too ugly to attend on me” this Can be seen as ironic as Faustus is being greedy about his power it is also ambivalent and it is evident that he is repelled but even this doesn’t persuade him to repent.
On the contrary to this the real appeal of the play can be seen as Faustus’ tragic fate and vacillating mind and soul as once he sells his soul to Lucifer he instantly thinks of repenting, in this sense the dramatic use of magic is almost incidental to the real story of Faustus’ internal struggle with himself which Marlowe intended not as a fantastical battle but that of a realistic portrayal of a human being divided between good and evil. The internal confliction between religion would have been quite common during the renaissance period as science and more intellectual reasoning became a lot more popular and many people including Marlowe himself would have been dissuaded from religion, however Faustus’ tragic fate would have been most appealing to audiences as they would have been aware of the downfall they would face if they followed the same path as Faustus “his waxen wings did mount above his reach” this can be interpreted as Marlowe showing that aiming too high will cause a large downfall which ultimately can be argued as the plays greatest appeal. “Faustus is the living, struggling natural, personal man” (Taine H.A history of English Literature) the way in which Marlowe portrays Faustus not only following Aristotle’s tragic hero but he also demonstrates some of humanities hamartia’s such as gluttony and a hunger for power which is arguably the main point Marlowe is trying to establish throughout the play and the magic and necromancy only adds as a spectacle towards the audience highlighting the morals within the play.
Referring back to the original question even though the use of black magic and necromancy is appealing to the audience and gives them images of hell and dark magic that they would never have seen ultimately the most appealing aspect of the play would be the downfall of Faustus himself and his internal confliction between good and evil as it acts as a reminder to the renaissance audience to remain faithful to god or face the same consequences as Faustus “cut is the branch that might have grown full” with black magic hand in hand Faustus was wasted potential and the visual of hell and necromancy adds to this message and undoubtedly appeals to the audience both modern and past.
How/why are you revising this much
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auburnstar
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(Original post by AllanSmith22)
How/why are you revising this much
I'm not the OP but unless you're an Essay God TM writing essays/essay plans is pretty solid revision for A level so there's good reason to - more practice = better essays, generally (and better writing under timed conditions)! As for how, that's up to the OP to say.
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