Ireland was colonised by Britain for over 600 years - why has Ireland flourished?

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Flashing Planet
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#1
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#1
Ireland was colonised by Britain for over 600 years, yet it is a dynamic, first world country with one of the highest standards of living and human development. Yet Ireland has contributed a massive plethora of artists, writers and scientists.

Ireland is one of Europes foremost technological entities.

Why is this? Surely as ireland was invaded and colonised far longer than any ME country then it should be in a worse off state?

Explanations please?
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Blank Ocean
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Celtic magic
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Bang Outta Order
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#3
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Cos the Irish in the North are technically British

The Republic is still a steaming toilet compared to non republic cities

Plus the people who left and came to UK probably assimilated into English society and took themselves as the example for non-English blood Irish in Ireland.

Basically. It still has its societal and domestic problems.
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The Epicurean
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#4
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I suspect the large emigrant population sending money back to Ireland might have helped. To take the population of Ireland in 1900, which was about 4.5million. For the 100 years prior to 1900, almost an equal amount of Irish people went to America. This excludes the Irish emigration to many other nations also. I imagine such a large emigrant population, larger than the population of the country itself, sending money home from countries where wages are much higher would have helped. Whilst that doesn't explain everything, it is possibly a factor unique to Ireland which sets it apart from other nations.
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Doones
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(Original post by The Epicurean)
I suspect the large emigrant population sending money back to Ireland might have helped. To take the population of Ireland in 1900, which was about 4.5million. For the 100 years prior to 1900, almost an equal amount of Irish people went to America. This excludes the Irish emigration to many other nations also. I imagine such a large emigrant population, larger than the population of the country itself, sending money home from countries where wages are much higher would have helped. Whilst that doesn't explain everything, it is possibly a factor unique to Ireland which sets it apart from other nations.
Currently approx 1% of GDP.

https://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/p...79747?mode=amp

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Yaboi
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I've never understood how the Republic has the GDP per capita it does.
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TheGreatPumpkin
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#7
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(Original post by Yaboi)
I've never understood how the Republic has the GDP per capita it does.
Potatoes and cabbages
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staryuuu
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#8
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It's obvious, isn't it? It's a white country.

The british empire was deeply racist, their belief for enforcing brutal tactics on countries and capturing black slaves comes from the inherent belief that white people are superior.
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The Epicurean
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#9
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But we are discussing the development of Ireland and how it came to the position it is at now. The numbers emigrating now are not as large as they were in the early 20th century and before, which I imagine would have made a far larger contribution to the economy. But if we are to talk of the present, I imagine descendents returning as tourists are a far greater source of income for Ireland now than money being sent back.

This site here puts money sent back at roughly $5 million a year, which I would assume is set at the value of the dollar back then. Factoring in the value $5 million for the present day terms, and finding what percentage such a value contributed to the Irish GDP, I imagine, would result in a much different figure.

http://tenement-museum.blogspot.co.u...ing-money.html
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Doones
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#10
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(Original post by Yaboi)
I've never understood how the Republic has the GDP per capita it does.
Google, etc are based in Ireland. That helps a bit. Although not so much with regard to taxation...

Oh, and Bono.
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Doones
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#11
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(Original post by The Epicurean)
But we are discussing the development of Ireland and how it came to the position it is at now. The numbers emigrating now are not as large as they were in the early 20th century and before, which I imagine would have made a far larger contribution to the economy. But if we are to talk of the present, I imagine descendents returning as tourists are a far greater source of income for Ireland now than money being sent back.

This site here puts money sent back at roughly $5 million a year, which I would assume is set at the value of the dollar back then. Factoring in the value $5 million for the present day terms, and finding what percentage such a value contributed to the Irish GDP, I imagine, would result in a much different figure.

http://tenement-museum.blogspot.co.u...ing-money.html
$5 million in 1890 would be worth about $125 million now. Tidy but not earth shattering.
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Profesh
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#12
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
Google, etc are based in Ireland. That helps a bit. Although not so much with regard to taxation...

Oh, and Bono.
With much the same caveat, I suspect.
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Doones
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#13
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(Original post by Profesh)
With much the same caveat, I suspect.
Indeed. They used to shelter under Ireland's generous tax regime for "artists" - but I seem to remember they've moved to Holland for tax purposes now.

Yep: http://www.independent.ie/irish-news...-29598593.html
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Conorcinny02
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#14
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[QUOTE=0to100;71045912]Cos the Irish in the North are technically British

How in the hell are irish in the north technically british? im just as irish as someone living in cork ! explain
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username2228735
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#15
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Taxation.
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TCFactor
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#16
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As a confirmed republican. Not irs level. Basically the British stripped them of their culture, their religion and stole their land... I think it's just revenge. Wanted to claim their country back. You might see Ireland as btec Britain. But... Much better than us.
Btw, my phone is slow. Ignore any lack of structure.
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Sarahsez
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#17
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Why has Canada, Australia and New Zealand?
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L i b
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#18
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#18
If Ireland was really "colonised" that far back, so too was England. What you're talking about is the Norman Conquest of Ireland, which came from England - certainly - but England was just as much taken over and incorporated into a wider Angevin Empire.

The two countries from that point onward had a united monarchy, but it remained Anglo-Norman: they never left, they just started looking a bit more local. Ireland continued as a separate kingdom under a common monarchy until 1801, when it became an equal part of the United Kingdom. That's hardly unusual in European history and it's pretty far off being a colonial relationship.
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LiviMary
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#19
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(Original post by L i b)
If Ireland was really "colonised" that far back, so too was England. What you're talking about is the Norman Conquest of Ireland, which came from England - certainly - but England was just as much taken over and incorporated into a wider Angevin Empire.

The two countries from that point onward had a united monarchy, but it remained Anglo-Norman: they never left, they just started looking a bit more local. Ireland continued as a separate kingdom under a common monarchy until 1801, when it became an equal part of the United Kingdom. That's hardly unusual in European history and it's pretty far off being a colonial relationship.
Sorry to interject, but not totally accurate. We actually do this stuff at our equivalent of GCSE. I can’t pull the dates out from the top of my head (doing later modern history now - thank God), but English colonization happened during the plantations in the 1600s. Most weren’t that successful, but the Ulster ones were. Most of the Irish land was then taken up by British landlords, so we’re talking indentured servitude. The reason the famine hit so bad was because 1) people didn’t own their own land - they had to pay landlords in London and such, so they were made effectively homeless and 2) Charles Trevelyan and his lot effectively committed quasi-genocide. Despite the massive mortality rate, they continued exporting corn (“Trevelyan’s Corn”) and left just potatoes which, yeah, not a good source any more. But I digress.

You mentioned the Act of Union in 1801, but that was actually a response to the 1798 rebellion - the first time proper republicanism enters the field. The Irish people were already sick of foreign, English rule.

If you want to know more about the whole tenant farmer/indentured servitude debacle, look up Charles Parnell or the (Anglo-Irish) Economic War. Both nineteenth and twentieth century reactions to depression brought on way back in the plantations.
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Wōden
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#20
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Some peoples are inately adept at building and/or maintaining functional, modern civilisations, others are not so adept. And the latter will often blame this on everything but their own ineptitude.
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