How much Engineering is there in A Level product design?

Watch
username3109456
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#1
Hi,

I would like to become an engineer (in either Electrical, Mechanical or Aerospace Engineering) and according to my school prospectus an A Level in product design can lead to a career in Engineering but from what I've seen of the GCSE product design students it doesn't seem very relatable to engineering (I could easily be wrong please don't get angry) and I was wondering whether I should do A Levels in Physics and Product Design or go to college and do engineering.

Any guidance would be appreciated, thanks.
0
reply
Doones
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 years ago
#2
(Original post by __CalFrench01)
Hi,

I would like to become an engineer (in either Electrical, Mechanical or Aerospace Engineering) and according to my school prospectus an A Level in product design can lead to a career in Engineering but from what I've seen of the GCSE product design students it doesn't seem very relatable to engineering (I could easily be wrong please don't get angry) and I was wondering whether I should do A Levels in Physics and Product Design or go to college and do engineering.

Any guidance would be appreciated, thanks.
The usual A-levels are Maths and Physics plus one other. Adding Design & Tech, as a 3rd A-level, would be absolutely fine.

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
Smack
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#3
Report 3 years ago
#3
(Original post by __CalFrench01)
Hi,

I would like to become an engineer (in either Electrical, Mechanical or Aerospace Engineering) and according to my school prospectus an A Level in product design can lead to a career in Engineering but from what I've seen of the GCSE product design students it doesn't seem very relatable to engineering (I could easily be wrong please don't get angry) and I was wondering whether I should do A Levels in Physics and Product Design or go to college and do engineering.

Any guidance would be appreciated, thanks.
What does the syllabus include? Design is a key part of engineering. Along with maths and physics, it could be quite useful, depending on the syllabus.
0
reply
Rexar
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#4
Report 3 years ago
#4
Im not gonna try to convince you otherwise but I study Maths, Physics and Product Design at A level.

Which subject is my hardest, Product Design by far.
There is so much to do before you have to hand in the coursework, Product design is an easy AS but a hard A2. I havent even finished the coursework yet and I only have 2 weeks left, I am so rushed and I dont have much time to study other subjects, it also takes up all of your frees.

Non the less, good luck in your decision!
0
reply
Smack
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#5
Report 3 years ago
#5
(Original post by Rexar)
Im not gonna try to convince you otherwise but I study Maths, Physics and Product Design at A level.

Which subject is my hardest, Product Design by far.
There is so much to do before you have to hand in the coursework, Product design is an easy AS but a hard A2. I havent even finished the coursework yet and I only have 2 weeks left, I am so rushed and I dont have much time to study other subjects, it also takes up all of your frees.

Non the less, good luck in your decision!
What does the product design A-level syllabus include? If you don't mind me asking, what do you design?
0
reply
CoolCavy
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#6
Report 3 years ago
#6
like none :rofl:
there is a bit about graphs and destructive/none destructive testing but that is no harder than GCSE physics imho

(Original post by Smack)
What does the product design A-level syllabus include? If you don't mind me asking, what do you design?
anything you want, for year 13 at least and within reason (i.e something that can be made in a school)
1
reply
Rexar
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#7
Report 3 years ago
#7
(Original post by Smack)
What does the product design A-level syllabus include? If you don't mind me asking, what do you design?
I do OCR product design, at AS we were told to focus on something simple (boring) like redesigning some sort of handle, this was an easy A
At A2 we have the choice to design literally anything we want. although it is more interesting it is incredibly hard and time consuming (obviously depending on what you make)

But its not just about the designing coursework, the exams are really stressful and time consuming, at AS I got 114/120 in my coursework but I only got a D in the exam (innovation challenge)
Overall, not gonna lie, I don't recommend the subject

As for the syllabus there is a lot of information to learn, however most of the exams this year is based on design and development. But we havent even started to learn the information off the syllabus yet, as I mentioned because the coursework takes up too much time.
1
reply
Smack
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#8
Report 3 years ago
#8
(Original post by CoolCavy)
like none :rofl:
there is a bit about graphs and destructive/none destructive testing but that is no harder than GCSE physics imho



anything you want, for year 13 at least and within reason (i.e something that can be made in a school)
(Original post by Rexar)
I do OCR product design, at AS we were told to focus on something simple (boring) like redesigning some sort of handle, this was an easy A
At A2 we have the choice to design literally anything we want. although it is more interesting it is incredibly hard and time consuming (obviously depending on what you make)

But its not just about the designing coursework, the exams are really stressful and time consuming, at AS I got 114/120 in my coursework but I only got a D in the exam (innovation challenge)
Overall, not gonna lie, I don't recommend the subject
Thanks for your replies. What you design something, how much detail do you go into? I.e. do you use CAD software to model it in 3D, or create production drawings? Are you expected to use technical or scientific principles to back up or verify your designs?
0
reply
CoolCavy
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#9
Report 3 years ago
#9
Oh also OP i forgot to say that whilst there isn't much engineering in product design A level it does compliment those other subjects well and shows you have a more creative side

(Original post by Smack)
Thanks for your replies. What you design something, how much detail do you go into? I.e. do you use CAD software to model it in 3D, or create production drawings? Are you expected to use technical or scientific principles to back up or verify your designs?
a lot of detail tbh (you keep a written portfolio throughout the project), there is 4 main stages i can think of:
-initial ideas, this takes a few months as you generate an idea based off a problem usually, for an example you identify an area that doesnt work in a product and would redesign that product for a client. you would then plan this out with sketches
-Modelling, a large stage, physical modelling using paper, board etc or sometimes MDF etc
-Manufacture, the making stages of the product, writing how you make it as you go along
-Testing and evaluation, testing your product against the initial criteria of what you wanted it to achieve and also compiling client feedback

you use 2D design which is a CAD programme if you are manufacturing your product using a CNC machine such as a laser cutter or the CNC router, at the end you also make a technical drawing on CAD which is designed to be read by a manufacturer so that theoretically you could make it in industry. Sometimes a model is also made in solid works (a 3D CAD programme) of how the product looks at the end

as for the science bit it depends on the product really, mine was focusing heavily on function this year so i did a lot of research on properties of materials etc but that would be of lesser important if you are focusing on aesthetics

hope that helped
0
reply
Rexar
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#10
Report 3 years ago
#10
(Original post by Smack)
Thanks for your replies. What you design something, how much detail do you go into? I.e. do you use CAD software to model it in 3D, or create production drawings? Are you expected to use technical or scientific principles to back up or verify your designs?
At A2, you go into a hell of a lot of detail, you need to design the initial idea (after research and stuff) you then need to make modifications to that idea, you need tk frequently speek to the client and targrt market, you then need to make further modifications and testing, you need to use modelling techniques, drawings and CAD models throughout, you then need to make a final CAD model, mine took me about 30 hours as it is fully functional and to size. You then need to make the product (pain in the ass) and you then need to test it, client and user feed back (where I an at now) and then finally make modifications
This is a simplified version, you need to initially design many ideas, take 2 to the development stage, model both is autocad, model both in the workshop, modify both, pick one of the two, modify the chosen one again.
This is excluding all of the research and testing and analysis and stuff as well
1
reply
asd90
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#11
Report 3 years ago
#11
(Original post by __CalFrench01)
Hi,

I would like to become an engineer (in either Electrical, Mechanical or Aerospace Engineering) and according to my school prospectus an A Level in product design can lead to a career in Engineering but from what I've seen of the GCSE product design students it doesn't seem very relatable to engineering (I could easily be wrong please don't get angry) and I was wondering whether I should do A Levels in Physics and Product Design or go to college and do engineering.

Any guidance would be appreciated, thanks.
This might not answer your question but for engineering the preferred a levels are maths and physics, doing further maths will be a bonus and an advantage- well for imperial anyways( civil engineering). But i'm sure further maths will still be a bonus regardless of uni for engineering but i could be wrong.( Not everyone does f.m and they still get in to Uni for engineering but if your sixth form offers they may ask why you didnt take it etc) But for theses subjects you have to work hard to achieve good grades,. Oh and for product design i did it in year 8 and i did engineering/ resistant material as well for year 11. The workload was too much especially for the coursework it takes a lot of time to do which means less time on your other subjects. So i can imagine it being more for a levels it self.
0
reply
Smack
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#12
Report 3 years ago
#12
(Original post by CoolCavy)
Oh also OP i forgot to say that whilst there isn't much engineering in product design A level it does compliment those other subjects well and shows you have a more creative side



a lot of detail tbh (you keep a written portfolio throughout the project), there is 4 main stages i can think of:
-initial ideas, this takes a few months as you generate an idea based off a problem usually, for an example you identify an area that doesnt work in a product and would redesign that product for a client. you would then plan this out with sketches
-Modelling, a large stage, physical modelling using paper, board etc or sometimes MDF etc
-Manufacture, the making stages of the product, writing how you make it as you go along
-Testing and evaluation, testing your product against the initial criteria of what you wanted it to achieve and also compiling client feedback

you use 2D design which is a CAD programme if you are manufacturing your product using a CNC machine such as a laser cutter or the CNC router, at the end you also make a technical drawing on CAD which is designed to be read by a manufacturer so that theoretically you could make it in industry. Sometimes a model is also made in solid works (a 3D CAD programme) of how the product looks at the end

as for the science bit it depends on the product really, mine was focusing heavily on function this year so i did a lot of research on properties of materials etc but that would be of lesser important if you are focusing on aesthetics

hope that helped
(Original post by Rexar)
At A2, you go into a hell of a lot of detail, you need to design the initial idea (after research and stuff) you then need to make modifications to that idea, you need tk frequently speek to the client and targrt market, you then need to make further modifications and testing, you need to use modelling techniques, drawings and CAD models throughout, you then need to make a final CAD model, mine took me about 30 hours as it is fully functional and to size. You then need to make the product (pain in the ass) and you then need to test it, client and user feed back (where I an at now) and then finally make modifications
This is a simplified version, you need to initially design many ideas, take 2 to the development stage, model both is autocad, model both in the workshop, modify both, pick one of the two, modify the chosen one again.
This is excluding all of the research and testing and analysis and stuff as well
Thanks for your replies, it sounds pretty interesting and quite useful for engineering.
0
reply
Doones
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#13
Report 3 years ago
#13
(Original post by Smack)
Thanks for your replies, it sounds pretty interesting and quite useful for engineering.
Agreed.

And, just for reference, some Cambridge colleges view it as a "preferred" subject for Engineering and nearly all consider it at least "somewhat desirable".
0
reply
Rexar
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#14
Report 3 years ago
#14
(Original post by Smack)
Thanks for your replies, it sounds pretty interesting and quite useful for engineering.
No problem, no doubt it is useful for engineering (this is why I dropped physhology even tho I got an A) if I wasnt doing engineering I would have dripped product design in a heart beat

Best of luck in your studies
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Current uni students - are you thinking of dropping out of university?

Yes, I'm seriously considering dropping out (66)
14.93%
I'm not sure (16)
3.62%
No, I'm going to stick it out for now (148)
33.48%
I have already dropped out (7)
1.58%
I'm not a current university student (205)
46.38%

Watched Threads

View All