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    Need help with revision tips? Motivation? Need advice on a particular subject? I'm here to help

    My subjects
    AQA - Government & Politics (AS+A2)
    AQA - Psychology (forensics, schizophrenia, relationships)
    AQA - Law (offences against person & property)


    EDIT: I will sadly no longer be replying to this thread as I never expected it to be used so well (thank you to all who commented and I hope I have at least helped in some way). I will still be here if you need help so just PM me, but it's hard to keep track of who I've replied to etc. so feel free to keep posting and helping each other but I will not longer be checking this thread. Best of luck to everyone!
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    My first exam is on the 18th of may and i haven't started revision yet. How do you motivate yourself to revise? and how do you revise ( hours, revision techniques)
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    How can you get from an A to A* in psychology (I'm predicted an A) and what do you do to revise/ how long do you revise for in an average day?
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    Similar to the question above, how long do you revise for (how many hours) and how long did you revise for during year 12 each day. Also what did you achieve in AS Law as I am taking that this year? Is the A2 content significantly harder or can you just memorise again? Thanks!
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    I do AQA Law and AQA Gov&Pol too and for some reason I really struggle with the longer questions in politics and I'm retaking AS Unit 2 as well so do you have any advice??
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    (Original post by kissthataxe)
    My first exam is on the 18th of may and i haven't started revision yet. How do you motivate yourself to revise? and how do you revise ( hours, revision techniques)
    I try to do a minimum of 5 hours on the weekend and 2-3 on a college day. I only get home from college at 5:15 and I get tired easily so I can't work past 8:00 anyway. That's why I have to make my revision time as productive as possible. It's too late now but in the future, try to make your revision notes at the end of the day or week or something so it's not all left to the last minute. It stressed my out in GCSEs when I had never made revision notes before and I suddely had to make them for 10 subjects in a month or so. Now, I try to make them during a free in college or at lunch or something so it's fresh in my mind and I have more time to do pure revision at the end of the year.

    My motivation comes from the image in my head of opening my envelope on results day and seeing that I have got the grades to get into the college that I want to go to. It also helps me to imagine two scenarios. The first is opening the paper on the day of the exam and not being able to answer any of the questions because I haven't revised well enough. The other is opening it and trying to scribble everything down as fast as I can because it's a topic that I'm comfortable with. I know which one I'd rather have so I try to imagine that when I'm procrastinating.

    My revision technique is really boring but it works. I seem to learn best by looking at the page/section I need to learn and just pace around my room reciting it until I get it right. I then move on to the next bit, and so on. I've got it now where I can learn a full A4 page of notes in about 5 minutes using that method. Everytime I make a mistake or start learning something new, I start the page again. I also reward myself with a wine gum or something small when I reach the end of a page successfully.

    Good luck for your exam!!
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    (Original post by itsokamix)
    How can you get from an A to A* in psychology (I'm predicted an A) and what do you do to revise/ how long do you revise for in an average day?
    The grade boundaries are really tight sometimes, so there might only be 4 marks difference. If possible, try to push yourself to just get one more mark on an answer (easier on the longer essays like 6+ marks). This might be just adding a few statistics, using key words, mentioning a study, talking about ethical issues, etc. Just anything to pick up a mark. I sat my mock on Friday and was 1 off an A* because I made a stupid mistake doing the sign test which I would have otherwise got 3 marks on because everything else was correct. I also lost a mark on a 4 mark stem question because I forgot to link it back to the stem. All I had to do to get the A* was mention that "Jenny would benefit from atypical frugs because it will lessen the effects that her current typical drugs have" (schizophrenia topic). If I had done that, it would have been an A*.

    I try to do about 2-3 hours on a college day and 5+ hours on a weekend. I tend to get into the zone when I start so it's easier to carry on. My revision method is boring but it works. I pace around my room reciting the page until I can do it purely from memory. I also watch videos sometimes on youtube of the studies being conducted (you can see Zimbardo, Milgram, Asch, Harlow, Ainsworth, etc. doing their original studies). This really helps you to get a good understanding of the study and can help you with evaluation points. For example, when watching the Zimbardo study, you can clearly see the lack of protection from harm of the prisoners.
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    (Original post by new1234)
    Similar to the question above, how long do you revise for (how many hours) and how long did you revise for during year 12 each day. Also what did you achieve in AS Law as I am taking that this year? Is the A2 content significantly harder or can you just memorise again? Thanks!
    I aim to do 2-3 hours on a college day and 5+ on a weekend/study leave. It was the same for AS but we didn't get study leave so I used up all of my free periods and lunches to make up for lost time.

    I got an A in Law last year (90% in both exams). 2nd year is more complicated as there are many more cases to learn and you need to learn the specific wording of the Acts (think like non-fatal offences, where you learn the AR and MR of them, but for every topic instead). TBH, once you understand the law, it's not too bad to revise because you remember the points of law for the cases, it's just a matter of matching them up to the names (the bit I struggle with). Some of them are really obvious so you just remember them because they're common sense. Others are a bit harder but they become second nature. We do at least 1 past paper question a week in class and bullet point what we'd include. They get a lot easier the more you do so I'd certainly recommend doing that. The worst pasrt of A2 is the essays at the end of the paper. You have 2 application questions (woth 25 marks each) but then have to evaluate a certain law in Law 03 (e.g. "evaluate the law on non-fatal offences") and discuss things like law vs morals, judicial creativity, etc in Law 04. These are essays that you can write in advance and just learn and reproduce in the exam as the questions are the same every year, it just depends on which one comes up. So you have to learn about 6 long essays (about 4 pages each) and only write about 2 of them in the exams. But your teacher will help you to write them so don't worry. The worst part is learning them.
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    have you make up and evaluation point for psychology. By this i mean the evaluation point is logically correct but its not on the handout.
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    (Original post by 10jero)
    I do AQA Law and AQA Gov&Pol too and for some reason I really struggle with the longer questions in politics and I'm retaking AS Unit 2 as well so do you have any advice??
    I treat the AS 25-markers the same as A2 30-markers as they both have roughly the same amount of time. This usually means I can get a good mark in the 25 essay because I've written more than I need to.

    AQA are annoying in how they word the questions for politics. It's usually a statement that you have to agree or disagree with. It doesn't matter whether you agree or disagree, so long as you back up your points with evidence and explanations, and don't forget to do at least one detailed paragraph coming from the other side of the debate.

    The mark scheme is split into 3 sections for the essays: content and understanding (AO1), analysis (AO2), SPAG and key terms (AO3). The most marks go to AO1 as this is the theory and evidence side of it. I don't know about A2 but this is worth 11/25 marks in AS so almost half. You need to explain the theoretical side of the arguement and use real life examples and quotes as often as possible. This can be either to back up or contradict your main point. AO2's easiest way to get marks is to say "in practice, however, it works like this" as things very rarely work the way they're supposed to. AO3 is spelling, punctuation, grammer, and correct use and spelling of key terms. Throw as many of these in as possible and use fancy punctuation (like using a semi-colon rather than a full stop) as this is worth roughly 5 marks which could be a grade boundary.

    GovP2, I'm doing the constitution and parliament topics so can only offer help on those. The constitution is partly judicial based as well so don't ignore that bit! It's mainly things like parliamentary sovereignty, Acts of Parliament, and reforming the constitution (things like the Fixed Term Parliaments Act 2011 and the Constutitional Reform Act 2005). If you're including acts, don't forget to capitalise them and remember their years! For parliament, the main issues are the powers of the executive, the opposition, the House of Lords, and things like representation and legitimation.

    In the AS exam, don't forget to refer back to the source if it mentions it as this will get you access to the top marks (8+). Even if the 5 marker is only something like "Explain the term "parliamentary sovereignty" used in the extract", you need to talk about it in context to the extract. In this case, if the extract focuses on the House of Commons, you need to explain that Parliament has sovereignty, but the HoC has the highest sovereignty within Parliament due to them being elected etc.
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    (Original post by grandeur10)
    have you make up and evaluation point for psychology. By this i mean the evaluation point is logically correct but its not on the handout.
    I have but only on things that I'm confident on, like Zimbardo and Milgram, because I don't want it to be wrong. I sometimes add things to the evaluations rather then change them because it makes it easier for me to understand the point and it'll get me more marks to add more detail.
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    (Original post by greghayes)
    The grade boundaries are really tight sometimes, so there might only be 4 marks difference. If possible, try to push yourself to just get one more mark on an answer (easier on the longer essays like 6+ marks). This might be just adding a few statistics, using key words, mentioning a study, talking about ethical issues, etc. Just anything to pick up a mark. I sat my mock on Friday and was 1 off an A* because I made a stupid mistake doing the sign test which I would have otherwise got 3 marks on because everything else was correct. I also lost a mark on a 4 mark stem question because I forgot to link it back to the stem. All I had to do to get the A* was mention that "Jenny would benefit from atypical frugs because it will lessen the effects that her current typical drugs have" (schizophrenia topic). If I had done that, it would have been an A*.

    I try to do about 2-3 hours on a college day and 5+ hours on a weekend. I tend to get into the zone when I start so it's easier to carry on. My revision method is boring but it works. I pace around my room reciting the page until I can do it purely from memory. I also watch videos sometimes on youtube of the studies being conducted (you can see Zimbardo, Milgram, Asch, Harlow, Ainsworth, etc. doing their original studies). This really helps you to get a good understanding of the study and can help you with evaluation points. For example, when watching the Zimbardo study, you can clearly see the lack of protection from harm of the prisoners.
    Yeah I know how you feel, I was 3 marks off an A* in my mock due to simple mistakes, guess it's just something I'll have to practice some more. I like the idea of your revision technique though, I'll have to try it out! Thanks
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    >Predicted A*A*A*
    And then you open the thread and see three humanity subjects, which are 3 non-facilitating.
    HAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHAH

    Come on man, that's not hard. Try taking some actual subjects, then talk.
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    (Original post by BobBobson)
    >Predicted A*A*A*
    And then you open the thread and see three humanity subjects, which are 3 non-facilitating.
    HAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHAH

    Come on man, that's not hard. Try taking some actual subjects, then talk.
    Law and Politics, fair enough, but psychology is officially a science at the same level as biology, physics, and chemistry. Just because it's a newer field, doesn't make it any less scientific. We use experimentaly methods just like any other science. And I happen to enjoy these subjects, so sorry if my personal choices are "laughable".

    I chose them because I enjoyed them and had a real interest. I'm glad I took politics because I now understand what I'm voting for in June (which just so happens to be the day of the UK Politics exam, goodie...). I took law because I originally wanted to become a barrister but went on work experience and hated it so it settled a long-lasting debate about whether to study law or psychology at university. I am a proud offer holder from a Russell Group university to study psychology and I hope to continue this through to a career as a registered psychologist.

    Also, your profile says you're 15 and studying GCSEs/equivalent so let me focus on my exams and you focus on yours.

    P.S I'm female
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    (Original post by BobBobson)
    >Predicted A*A*A*
    And then you open the thread and see three humanity subjects, which are 3 non-facilitating.
    HAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHAH

    Come on man, that's not hard. Try taking some actual subjects, then talk.
    lmao this guy is doing gcses and trying to chat
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    Hi I am doing Gcses and I wanted to ask :
    What did you get for your GCSE?
    How do you know to pick subjects like law and psychology if u have never studied them before?

    Thanks and I'm sorry some random wasteman wants to diss you for your subjects.
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    (Original post by greghayes)
    Law and Politics, fair enough, but psychology is officially a science at the same level as biology, physics, and chemistry. Just because it's a newer field, doesn't make it any less scientific. We use experimentaly methods just like any other science. And I happen to enjoy these subjects, so sorry if my personal choices are "laughable".

    I chose them because I enjoyed them and had a real interest. I'm glad I took politics because I now understand what I'm voting for in June (which just so happens to be the day of the UK Politics exam, goodie...). I took law because I originally wanted to become a barrister but went on work experience and hated it so it settled a long-lasting debate about whether to study law or psychology at university. I am a proud offer holder from a Russell Group university to study psychology and I hope to continue this through to a career as a registered psychologist.

    Also, your profile says you're 15 and studying GCSEs/equivalent so let me focus on my exams and you focus on yours.

    P.S I'm female
    Thanks for the help about AQA AS Law and A2 Law above! I have pretty much wrote model answers for all the questions in unit 1 and unit 2 except application questions which I have just memorised the general approach 4. As long as A2 is mostly content and less anything can come up like English Literature I should be fine writing essays. Also I think its better to take subjects you enjoy and get good in rather than take subjects you think are hard and universities will like and get a standard grade in them. Others would argue the opposite but I guess it is up to the university to decide and considering you have an offer from a Russel Group university there is no problem with your subjects so anyone who begs to differ can argue with the university that accepted you! Personally, I take Law, Biology, English Literature and Psychology and there is so much content to learn in law + the ridiculously high grade boundaries which makes me just as nervous as I am for other exams (probably English Literature a little more). Congratulations on getting an offer to study psychology as university particularly a Russel Group university since it is quite competitive and I wish you the best of luck in becoming a registered psychologist!
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    (Original post by greghayes)
    Law and Politics, fair enough, but psychology is officially a science at the same level as biology, physics, and chemistry. Just because it's a newer field, doesn't make it any less scientific. We use experimentaly methods just like any other science. And I happen to enjoy these subjects, so sorry if my personal choices are "laughable".

    I chose them because I enjoyed them and had a real interest. I'm glad I took politics because I now understand what I'm voting for in June (which just so happens to be the day of the UK Politics exam, goodie...). I took law because I originally wanted to become a barrister but went on work experience and hated it so it settled a long-lasting debate about whether to study law or psychology at university. I am a proud offer holder from a Russell Group university to study psychology and I hope to continue this through to a career as a registered psychologist.

    Also, your profile says you're 15 and studying GCSEs/equivalent so let me focus on my exams and you focus on yours.

    P.S I'm female
    You were stupid for picking law because even for a law degree they recommend that you don't take it because it's useless to study at A Level.
    If you need to spend two years of study just to even understand who to vote for, you're even more stupid.
    And psychology ain't a science. It's just applied biology.
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    (Original post by Mosope17)
    Hi I am doing Gcses and I wanted to ask :
    What did you get for your GCSE?
    How do you know to pick subjects like law and psychology if u have never studied them before?

    Thanks and I'm sorry some random wasteman wants to diss you for your subjects.
    Hey These were my subjects and grades:

    A* Drama
    A* Maths
    A English Literature
    A English Language
    A French
    A Geography
    A Science
    A Additional Science
    B ICT
    B Business Studies

    I have studied a few different subjects over the last 2 years. I started year 12 with Law, Psychology, Biology, and French. I chose law because I thought I would like to become a barrister (and although I no longer do, I still enjoy law despite it being a difficult subject). I chose psychology because I wanted to do it at GCSE but they scrapped it a few years earlier - after the only teacher left - and it sounded interesting. I chose French because I was doing well in GCSEs and wanted to carry it on as a language (although dropped it after the Feb mocks as I was getting continuous E grades with no signs of improvement) and biology as it was the only core science that I enjoyed (and I again dropped it despite getting a B as I hated it and would have rather done a 1 year course, which is now politics).
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    (Original post by BobBobson)
    You were stupid for picking law because even for a law degree they recommend that you don't take it because it's useless to study at A Level.
    If you need to spend two years of study just to even understand who to vote for, you're even more stupid.
    And psychology ain't a science. It's just applied biology.
    This is going to be my final replyas my intention on this thread was to help people (as many people on the unanswered section ask things like "how do I revise?" and there's many questions about law and psychology as they are difficult subjects).

    Law is not required but they don't discriminate against those who do it. Having taken it now, I'm glad I did because we learn legislation by the word so what we learn is correct, even if it's not relevant to a law degree. Anyway, I decided not to become a barrister so now it's purely interest that's keeping me going.

    I'm studying politics in a year rather than 2 years and surely it's better to take it and learn something than just blindly guess? I'm the only one of my friends to have taken politics and now they're asking me literally everyday about things like left vs right wing, what Trident is, why does Parliament have to vote on the election, etc. so I'm glad that I'm able to inform them about that as they may have not voted ottherwise or have voted without being informed of their choices. I have never told them my political views, I have merely stated what each party's stance is on certain issues and what their manifestos are/might be (again, they didn't know the different between a manifesto and a mandate). If that makes me stupid, then sure, I don't mind being stupid. I would rather have learned something new than just gone in blind and voted based on how my family and friends are.

    Unless you have studied psychology, you cannot possibly know how much biology is involved. Yes, there is a biological approach and there is a section on biopsychology, but the rest is pure psychology. Biology doesn't explain why prisoners go on to reoffend when none of their family have (meaning that it's not genetic, therefore not biological) but psychology does. Again, it's my view and I won't explain anymore.

    This isn't the point of the thread and I will now spend the rest of my time helping the other lovely TSRians who need it (including a fair few who have PMed me as well for their own reasons). But thank you for boosting my thread back up to the top and I hope you have a successful exam season
 
 
 

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