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    when is UK next election day??? :confused:
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    Tuesday.
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    (Original post by Zapsta)
    Tuesday.
    Really? :eek:
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    I mean next prime minister election?!
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    when they decide to call one.

    love Katy ***
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    The next general election will probably be some time in 2005.
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    on a thursday
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    will there be any competition?? who will be competiting???
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    General elections must be held at least every five years. The initiation of the election process is controlled by the Prime Minister. Most governments operate on four year cycles though. As for who's running: anybody can compete for one of the 659 seats in Parliament. You can if you wish.

    People who gain seats in Parliament are typically associated with a political party. By convention (not law) the Queen will appoint as Prime Minister the leader of the party with more than half the seats in Parliament. Just in case you ask, the leaders of the main parties are Tony Blair (Labour), Michael Howard (Conservative), and Charles Kennedy (Liberal Democrats).
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    Labour were left but are now right...
    The Liberal Democrats were centre (moderately left) but are now left of Labour (who were supposed to be Left)...
    And Lord knows where the Conservatives are... :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by LifeWired)
    Labour were left but are now right...
    The Liberal Democrats were centre (moderately left) but are now left of Labour (who were supposed to be Left)...
    And Lord knows where the Conservatives are... :rolleyes:
    I think it's difficult to pin Labour to anywhere on the political spectrum, but I'd say they are more left. The problem with placing them is because Tony Blair et al don't have any political principles - they merely do what will win the most support with the electorate at the time.
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    (Original post by muncrun)
    General elections must be held at least every five years. The initiation of the election process is controlled by the Prime Minister. Most governments operate on four year cycles though. As for who's running: anybody can compete for one of the 659 seats in Parliament. You can if you wish.

    People who gain seats in Parliament are typically associated with a political party. By convention (not law) the Queen will appoint as Prime Minister the leader of the party with more than half the seats in Parliament. Just in case you ask, the leaders of the main parties are Tony Blair (Labour), Michael Howard (Conservative), and Charles Kennedy (Liberal Democrats).
    Not quite anybody, you cannot if you are not 21 (I was asked to be a paper candidate - someone who stands no chance of winning - in a parish council election recently but couldn't due to my age) in all forms of election including a general one. Neither can you if you are a life peer or a hereditary peer with a seat in the House of Lords, although you are allowed to retire your Lords seat and run for the Commons.
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    Hehe. Fairy muff.
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    (Original post by LifeWired)
    Labour were left but are now right...
    The Liberal Democrats were centre (moderately left) but are now left of Labour (who were supposed to be Left)...
    And Lord knows where the Conservatives are... :rolleyes:
    Its funny how a party of the political right as you have labelled them have introduced: the minimum wage; tax credits; reduced the amount of income tax paid by the poorest earners; increased public spending to record levels; introduced the New Deal to give opportunities to the unemployed to get back into work etc etc.

    Labour is often accused of being right wing, instead what it is, is a pragmatic blend of ideas from both left and right, thus it is somewhat difficult to place on the traditional spectrum, although many commentators stick it in the middle. That said I would accept that it depends where you draw the line between right and left and that is another debate entirely...
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    (Original post by muncrun)
    I think it's difficult to pin Labour to anywhere on the political spectrum, but I'd say they are more left. The problem with placing them is because Tony Blair et al don't have any political principles - they merely do what will win the most support with the electorate at the time.
    Actually they do have political principles, unfortunately they're all based in the media.

    I would argue that Labour certainly aren't as left as the Liberal Democrats on many issues, as you've said, they are trying to win most support. Such 'left/right' metaphores aren't particularly accurate in any case, I was merely being humorous.


    (Original post by Imagashead)
    Labour is often accused of being right wing, instead what it is, is a pragmatic blend of ideas from both left and right
    Agreed. (I didn't expect this level of grilling outside the Debate forum.)
 
 
 
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