A Level Computer Science or Economics?

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enlightenme
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Hi, I'm in year 11 and currently in the process of choosing my A-Levels. So far I've chosen:
Maths
Further Maths
Physics
The sixth forms I've applied for require a fourth A level to be taken. For one school, I've applied for Economics AS level which I am allowed to drop at the end of year 12. The other school: I've applied for Computer Science A-level which I would have to do for both years. (Not all schools are doing the new system of no AS).
In terms of usefulness in the future, which one should I take? I am interested in both. To be honest, I don't think difficulty should really be a problem.
Just as an insight - I'm an aspiring inventor/engineer and have recently been really interested in tech. In the future, I want to make innovative and futuristic gadgets. I would like to study a STEM subject in uni, like Engineering, Robotics or Computer Science (not necessarily limited to these). I'll admit, I am a bit ambitious.
I'd prefer to start learning about these kinds of things early. So does a level CS give you the knowledge to, let's say, successfully build your own iOS/Android app? I would also like to know if there are any focus on electronics in CS a level.
Or should I just self-teach myself programming and such? If so, how long would it take, considering I also have my A-Levels to do?
I would also like a minimum of A*AA/A*AAB at the end of my 2 years.
Also, I have not taken Computer Science for GCSE since I had only started getting interested in tech about half a year ago.
Everyone is trying to get me to avoid CS since they all hated it in GCSE, so is A level CS anything like GCSE?
I'd really appreciate the help.
Sorry for the long post.
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Purpleunicorn197
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(Original post by enlightenme)
Hi, I'm in year 11 and currently in the process of choosing my A-Levels. So far I've chosen:
Maths
Further Maths
Physics
The sixth forms I've applied for require a fourth A level to be taken. For one school, I've applied for Economics AS level which I am allowed to drop at the end of year 12. The other school: I've applied for Computer Science A-level which I would have to do for both years. (Not all schools are doing the new system of no AS).
In terms of usefulness in the future, which one should I take? I am interested in both. To be honest, I don't think difficulty should really be a problem.
Just as an insight - I'm an aspiring inventor/engineer and have recently been really interested in tech. In the future, I want to make innovative and futuristic gadgets. I would like to study a STEM subject in uni, like Engineering, Robotics or Computer Science (not necessarily limited to these). I'll admit, I am a bit ambitious.
I'd prefer to start learning about these kinds of things early. So does a level CS give you the knowledge to, let's say, successfully build your own iOS/Android app? I would also like to know if there are any focus on electronics in CS a level.
Or should I just self-teach myself programming and such? If so, how long would it take, considering I also have my A-Levels to do?
I would also like a minimum of A*AA/A*AAB at the end of my 2 years.
Also, I have not taken Computer Science for GCSE since I had only started getting interested in tech about half a year ago.
Everyone is trying to get me to avoid CS since they all hated it in GCSE, so is A level CS anything like GCSE?
I'd really appreciate the help.
Sorry for the long post.
Hiya, I don't do Economics or Computer Science but I do study maths, further maths and physics...and chemistry but we needn't talk about that
I think from what it sounds like, computer science may be the one for you. What is your maths like now? My brother does computer science GCSE (Yr 11) and the course work is intense but he enjoys it and will continue to A level.

I think self-teaching some programming is a good idea, I've self-taught some Python and C and if you really apply yourself to it it's not too bad.
In terms of usefulness, they are both pretty useful but looking at the way the world is going, computer science may be a bit more valuable.

Hope that helps
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username3110466
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def computer science and it goes very well with maths.
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enlightenme
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(Original post by Purpleunicorn197)
Hiya, I don't do Economics or Computer Science but I do study maths, further maths and physics...and chemistry but we needn't talk about that
I think from what it sounds like, computer science may be the one for you. What is your maths like now? My brother does computer science GCSE (Yr 11) and the course work is intense but he enjoys it and will continue to A level.

I think self-teaching some programming is a good idea, I've self-taught some Python and C and if you really apply yourself to it it's not too bad.
In terms of usefulness, they are both pretty useful but looking at the way the world is going, computer science may be a bit more valuable.

Hope that helps
Thanks, I think if I end up doing economics, I'll probably self-teach myself some programming. The problem is time.
Maths, I'm pretty confident in so it shouldn't be much of a problem.
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dan1yar18
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Unless your school has teachers good at teaching Computer Science (which is unlikely) then do not pick it, trust me, I've been there. If you don't mind essays then Economics should be an 'easy' AS which you should probably drop at the end of Y12. Further Maths and Physics will take up a lot of your time at A2.
In terms of being the same as GCSE; pretty much yes. The first year (for OCR) is very theory based and there is almost 0 programming. The second year is when you beging to implement more maths and do a programming task but that's long. Have a look at the specification for your school's exam board and see what you like/don't like.
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enlightenme
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(Original post by dan1yar18)
Unless your school has teachers good at teaching Computer Science (which is unlikely) then do not pick it, trust me, I've been there. If you don't mind essays then Economics should be an 'easy' AS which you should probably drop at the end of Y12. Further Maths and Physics will take up a lot of your time at A2.
In terms of being the same as GCSE; pretty much yes. The first year (for OCR) is very theory based and there is almost 0 programming. The second year is when you beging to implement more maths and do a programming task but that's long. Have a look at the specification for your school's exam board and see what you like/don't like.
The school I've applied for is doing the new AQA A level. I'll be sure to look at the specification. Thanks.
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Shiba_Inu
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Hey. I do both A-level Computer Science and Economics and I would say personally I enjoy the Computer Science course more. I find Economics more difficult, but i'm not sure about you. From what courses and future you are describing, i'd say Computer Science.
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enlightenme
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(Original post by Shiba_Inu)
Hey. I do both A-level Computer Science and Economics and I would say personally I enjoy the Computer Science course more. I find Economics more difficult, but i'm not sure about you. From what courses and future you are describing, i'd say Computer Science.
Does CS coursework disrupt time for other subjects?
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Shiba_Inu
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(Original post by enlightenme)
Does CS coursework disrupt time for other subjects?
I'm doing OCR and im in year 12. There is no year 1 coursework but there is a programming project in year 13 for OCR which is 20% of the final grade. I'm not sure how it works for other exam boards though.
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enlightenme
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(Original post by Shiba_Inu)
I'm doing OCR and im in year 12. There is no year 1 coursework but there is a programming project in year 13 for OCR which is 20% of the final grade. I'm not sure how it works for other exam boards though.
Yeah there's a project in year 13 that's 20% of the grade for AQA, too. Do you know how long the coursework/project is? And is it a group project or independent?
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manav27
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(Original post by enlightenme)
Hi, I'm in year 11 and currently in the process of choosing my A-Levels. So far I've chosen:
Maths
Further Maths
Physics
The sixth forms I've applied for require a fourth A level to be taken. For one school, I've applied for Economics AS level which I am allowed to drop at the end of year 12. The other school: I've applied for Computer Science A-level which I would have to do for both years. (Not all schools are doing the new system of no AS).
In terms of usefulness in the future, which one should I take? I am interested in both. To be honest, I don't think difficulty should really be a problem.
Just as an insight - I'm an aspiring inventor/engineer and have recently been really interested in tech. In the future, I want to make innovative and futuristic gadgets. I would like to study a STEM subject in uni, like Engineering, Robotics or Computer Science (not necessarily limited to these). I'll admit, I am a bit ambitious.
I'd prefer to start learning about these kinds of things early. So does a level CS give you the knowledge to, let's say, successfully build your own iOS/Android app? I would also like to know if there are any focus on electronics in CS a level.
Or should I just self-teach myself programming and such? If so, how long would it take, considering I also have my A-Levels to do?
I would also like a minimum of A*AA/A*AAB at the end of my 2 years.
Also, I have not taken Computer Science for GCSE since I had only started getting interested in tech about half a year ago.
Everyone is trying to get me to avoid CS since they all hated it in GCSE, so is A level CS anything like GCSE?
I'd really appreciate the help.
Sorry for the long post.
So what did you pick for a levels because i have the three you picked (maths, further maths, physics) but I don't know whether to do cs or economics.
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enlightenme
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Im doing maths fmaths physics, i was doing chemistry aswell but decided to drop it and continue with 3 subjects
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ath79
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(Original post by Shiba_Inu)
I'm doing OCR and im in year 12. There is no year 1 coursework but there is a programming project in year 13 for OCR which is 20% of the final grade. I'm not sure how it works for other exam boards though.
my school does OCR as well, did computer science a level take up a lot of time? is the theory part mainly a build up from gcse? (i'm taking my cambridge igcse computer science in june 2020)
for the programming bit, how many languages are you expected to be able to write in? i'm using python for my igcse now.
thanks!!!
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