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MaraIdek
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I'm so confused honestly I wanna study medicine, but I want to do something with computer science so i don't really know what to do. Should I take biology, chemistry, computer science and religious studies or geography??? Or should I just take three??
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TSR Jessica
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Sorry you've not had any responses about this. Are you sure you've posted in the right place? Here's a link to our subject forum which should help get you more responses if you post there.


Just quoting in Danny Dorito so she can move the thread if needed :wizard:
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artful_lounger
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You seem a little undecided, as computer science and medicine don't have a huge overlap except in the area of bioinformatics primarily, which doesn't have a significant overlap with clinical medicine typically. Also bioinformatics is more of a mathematical field than anything (as is most "academic" computer science at the university level and beyond), so A-level maths would be more help with this than computer science. Also very few, if any (I'm not aware of any personally) computer science courses require any programming experience beforehand; however most require A-level maths. So there is that as well. Maths is also not a bad A-level for medicine, but I appreciate some people take issue with it as a subject after experiences at GCSE etc (although A-level maths is very different qualitatively from GCSE maths and much more engaging and feels less like mindless pedantry and more like actual problem solving).

If you're just interested in learning to program (the benefits of which as a clinical practitioner are variable; you probably won't use it a huge among in a direct way but programming and computing knowledge is always useful), you certainly don't need an A-level to do this; in fact, "teaching" programming tends to be a fairly binary process where you don't learn much in lessons/lectures compared to actually sitting in the computer lab and trying to write a program; while it can help you get to that first step of doing so, it's in now way a prerequisite to it. Programming is very much an experiential/heuristic process for both learning the basics and developing your own programs. Meanwhile as noted, much of the "formal" elements of computer science are very mathematical and somewhat divorced from the practicalities of actual programming.
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