voltz
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#1
I know that the forces acting between 2 protons are:

Gravitational attractive force
Electrostatic repulsive force
Strong nuclear force

However, I am not sure what the relationship between these 3 forces is.

Is it Fs = Fg + Fe or Fs = Fe - Fg ?

Or are these the same, but the second one is considering the direction of the force whereas the first is only considering magnitude, since -(-) would give you an addition of the magnitudes of the two forces?
0
reply
Kyx
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 years ago
#2
(Original post by voltz)
I know that the forces acting between 2 protons are:

Gravitational attractive force
Electrostatic repulsive force
Strong nuclear force

However, I am not sure what the relationship between these 3 forces is.

Is it Fs = Fg + Fe or Fs = Fe - Fg ?

Or are these the same, but the second one is considering the direction of the force whereas the first is only considering magnitude, since -(-) would give you an addition of the magnitudes of the two forces?
The strongest force is the strong, followed by the electrostatic, followed by gravity

In fact, Fs > Fe + Fg ( I am 99% sure of this)

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
voltz
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#3
(Original post by Kyx)
The strongest force is the strong, followed by the electrostatic, followed by gravity

In fact, Fs > Fe + Fg ( I am 99% sure of this)

Posted from TSR Mobile
So the equation to use would be Fs = Fg + Fe? Its just that I came across a past paper question which uses Fe = Fg + Fs so I'm a but unsure.
0
reply
Kyx
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#4
Report 3 years ago
#4
(Original post by voltz)
So the equation to use would be Fs = Fg + Fe? Its just that I came across a past paper question which uses Fe = Fg + Fs so I'm a but unsure.
I think I get it now.

The protons experience no net force, so Fe = Fs + Fg

Therefore Fs = Fe - Fg

Do you know the answer to the question?


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
voltz
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#5
(Original post by Kyx)
I think I get it now.

The protons experience no net force, so Fe = Fs + Fg

Therefore Fs = Fe - Fg

Do you know the answer to the question?


Posted from TSR Mobile
Yes, the answer is Fs = Fe - Fg.

Would you not get the same answer if you used Fs = Fe + Fg but ignored the minus sign on the gravitational force? So adding the magnitudes?
0
reply
Amenazainab12
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#6
Report 3 years ago
#6
(i) Complete Fig for the time until the ball reaches B.Name:  Physics 9702 Doubts   Help Page 102   Physics Reference.png
Views: 103
Size:  31.9 KB Im new dont know where to get an answer hope someone helps.
0
reply
Kyx
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#7
Report 3 years ago
#7
(Original post by voltz)
Yes, the answer is Fs = Fe - Fg.

Would you not get the same answer if you used Fs = Fe + Fg but ignored the minus sign on the gravitational force? So adding the magnitudes?
I do not know


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Are you travelling in the Uni student travel window (3-9 Dec) to go home for Christmas?

Yes (135)
28.6%
No - I have already returned home (63)
13.35%
No - I plan on travelling outside these dates (93)
19.7%
No - I'm staying at my term time address over Christmas (45)
9.53%
No - I live at home during term anyway (136)
28.81%

Watched Threads

View All