JakeRStudent
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
Does anybody know the rules for significant figures in tables? Especially from calculate values from say another column. How many significant figures or decimal places should it be recorded to? The practical guide book is little help for this so if anybody knows I'm sure itll help more than just me!
0
reply
JakeRStudent
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#2
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#2
bump
0
reply
Joinedup
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
(Original post by JakeRStudent)
bump
Tables of experimental results?
0
reply
JakeRStudent
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by Joinedup)
Tables of experimental results?
I'm more so talking about tables were it contains some results. And then another table for you to calculate values and input them yourself.
0
reply
Joinedup
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by JakeRStudent)
I'm more so talking about tables were it contains some results. And then another table for you to calculate values and input them yourself.
usual rules for calculations, use the same number of significant figures as the lowest number of significant figures of any value being used in the calculation.
0
reply
JakeRStudent
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#6
(Original post by Joinedup)
usual rules for calculations, use the same number of significant figures as the lowest number of significant figures of any value being used in the calculation.
What if some of the calculated values end up different powers of 10? They have to be the same significant figures so then what?
0
reply
Joinedup
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#7
Report 2 years ago
#7
(Original post by JakeRStudent)
What if some of the calculated values end up different powers of 10? They have to be the same significant figures so then what?
general idea is...
1.2345 to 2 sf is 1.2
1.2345 X 1047 to 2 sf is 1.2 X 1047

if that doesn;t cover it could you give an example?
0
reply
JakeRStudent
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#8
(Original post by Joinedup)
general idea is...
1.2345 to 2 sf is 1.2
1.2345 X 1047 to 2 sf is 1.2 X 1047

if that doesn;t cover it could you give an example?
Sorry but I understand how to do significant figures.

Say for example you were given values of d and sin theta. Now you can calculate d from these results. Now say halfway down the table your value of the wavelength goes from 98nm to 122nm (I appreciate they are not anything you'd ever really expect). Now you suggest that it should be done to the smallest number of significant figures of the data present, and I agree, but in markschemes they state to keep the same number of dp for each result. So which number of significant figures do we keep to define how many decimal places? Because different data gets different values?

Do you understand my query now or should I try again?
0
reply
Joinedup
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#9
Report 2 years ago
#9
(Original post by JakeRStudent)
Sorry but I understand how to do significant figures.

Say for example you were given values of d and sin theta. Now you can calculate d from these results. Now say halfway down the table your value of the wavelength goes from 98nm to 122nm (I appreciate they are not anything you'd ever really expect). Now you suggest that it should be done to the smallest number of significant figures of the data present, and I agree, but in markschemes they state to keep the same number of dp for each result. So which number of significant figures do we keep to define how many decimal places? Because different data gets different values?

Do you understand my query now or should I try again?
well in that case I think I'd assume 98nm really means 98.0 (i.e. 3sf) unless there was some unusual reason the measurements would have lower precision below 100nm or something.

sometimes your least significant digit will come out as a zero and if it's on the rhs of the decimal point your calculator will chop it off... but zero is still a perfectly valid digit and if it's one of your significant digits I think you should put it back by hand.

Can't give you a source for this - just what I think makes most sense
0
reply
JakeRStudent
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#10
(Original post by Joinedup)
well in that case I think I'd assume 98nm really means 98.0 (i.e. 3sf) unless there was some unusual reason the measurements would have lower precision below 100nm or something.

sometimes your least significant digit will come out as a zero and if it's on the rhs of the decimal point your calculator will chop it off... but zero is still a perfectly valid digit and if it's one of your significant digits I think you should put it back by hand.

Can't give you a source for this - just what I think makes most sense
No, I know how to choose significant figures. What I'm saying is in tables where you have to calculate multiple values MS want them all to the same number of dp. So how do you decide how many dp?
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance
    Contemporary Dance Undergraduate
    Tue, 19 Nov '19
  • University of Surrey
    All subjects except Veterinary Medicine and Guildford School of Acting Undergraduate
    Wed, 20 Nov '19
  • The University of Law
    Solicitor Series: Discover Your Type of Law - LPC and GDL - Birmingham campus Postgraduate
    Wed, 20 Nov '19

Which party will you be voting for in the General Election?

Conservatives (147)
19.19%
Labour (325)
42.43%
Liberal Democrats (156)
20.37%
Green Party (42)
5.48%
Brexit Party (21)
2.74%
Independent Group for Change (Change UK) (2)
0.26%
SNP (9)
1.17%
Plaid Cymru (6)
0.78%
Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) (1)
0.13%
Sinn Fein (1)
0.13%
SDLP (0)
0%
Ulster Unionist (1)
0.13%
UKIP (7)
0.91%
Other (8)
1.04%
None (40)
5.22%

Watched Threads

View All