Grade Boundaries for new spec AQA A Level Physics Watch

Teenage Hype
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What will grade boundaries look like for an A and A* for the new spec AQA A level Physics Paper? Will they be lower than the past, or similar?
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Adam_1999
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Last year on the new spec AS physics paper it was 64% for A. Based on that, I would say 75% for an A* and 65% for an A. I would assume an error bound of +/- 2 or 3%.
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Teenage Hype
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How should I revise? Past papers, what else?
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Adam_1999
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(Original post by Teenage Hype)
How should I revise? Past papers, what else?
Go through the spec and make sure you ALL of the content. You have to know the content so well that I if I ask you a random question like how do electrons exhibit particle properties, you have to know it. Don't bother making notes, just use a revision guide.

Do past papers to help you get used to the style of the exam and to help with timing. The past papers you are doing now are considerably easier than what real exam is going to be like. What will help you the most is to do the hardest questions topic by topic - this will really help and will show you what content that you haven't gone through in class.

The hardest questions will normally be in the specimen papers. There are 2 sets of specimen papers; you can access set one in the AQA website, and set 2 which only teachers can access. Ask your teacher for a copy. All in all that is 6 A2 set one and two papers and 4 AS set one and set two papers. Do them all. Don't forget to do the June 2016 AS papers as well.

I'll leave you with a question to prove my point that you haven't learnt all of the content:
What are the two ways in which the radius of the nucleus was determined? Explain with equations how they work and explain why one method is more accurate than the other.
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Teenage Hype
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(Original post by Adam_1999)
Go through the spec and make sure you ALL of the content. You have to know the content so well that I if I ask you a random question like how do electrons exhibit particle properties, you have to know it. Don't bother making notes, just use a revision guide.

Do past papers to help you get used to the style of the exam and to help with timing. The past papers you are doing now are considerably easier than what real exam is going to be like. What will help you the most is to do the hardest questions topic by topic - this will really help and will show you what content that you haven't gone through in class.

The hardest questions will normally be in the specimen papers. There are 2 sets of specimen papers; you can access set one in the AQA website, and set 2 which only teachers can access. Ask your teacher for a copy. All in all that is 6 A2 set one and two papers and 4 AS set one and set two papers. Do them all. Don't forget to do the June 2016 AS papers as well.

I'll leave you with a question to prove my point that you haven't learnt all of the content:
What are the two ways in which the radius of the nucleus was determined? Explain with equations how they work and explain why one method is more accurate than the other.
Thanks buddy. I appreciate your help this close to exams.

I was doing Past Papers from before 2015, why are the past papers so much easier from before than the one this year? Is it because of the length?

I am now thinking to do all of the Textbook questions from the AQA (the weirdly written one that I dislike a lot, but questions are decent). Would this be a good idea?

Where do you get your hardest questions from?

And as to answer your question, I know that the radius of a nucleus is equal to R(subscript 0) x A^1/3, I know there is another one with de Broglie, but that is less accurate and I don't think that is on the spec, is it?

Also, what is the likelihood of me getting an A in A Level when I get 72% last year for AS by just using the CGP revision guide and some questions?
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Adam_1999
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72% is great! You're only 3 or 4% off an A*. Unless something really bad happens, you should get an A easy. Question: What did you get for your A2 mocks?
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Teenage Hype
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(Original post by Adam_1999)
Go through the spec and make sure you ALL of the content. You have to know the content so well that I if I ask you a random question like how do electrons exhibit particle properties, you have to know it. Don't bother making notes, just use a revision guide.

Do past papers to help you get used to the style of the exam and to help with timing. The past papers you are doing now are considerably easier than what real exam is going to be like. What will help you the most is to do the hardest questions topic by topic - this will really help and will show you what content that you haven't gone through in class.

The hardest questions will normally be in the specimen papers. There are 2 sets of specimen papers; you can access set one in the AQA website, and set 2 which only teachers can access. Ask your teacher for a copy. All in all that is 6 A2 set one and two papers and 4 AS set one and set two papers. Do them all. Don't forget to do the June 2016 AS papers as well.

I'll leave you with a question to prove my point that you haven't learnt all of the content:
What are the two ways in which the radius of the nucleus was determined? Explain with equations how they work and explain why one method is more accurate than the other.
Would you recommend this guy?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3cV9...az21JR&index=8

Planning on watching all of his videos!
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Adam_1999
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This is the first method for finding the radius:
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Adam_1999
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(Original post by Teenage Hype)
Would you recommend this guy?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3cV9...az21JR&index=8

Planning on watching all of his videos!
He is good if you don't know anything about a certain topic, and need to relearn it. The problem with him is that sometimes his videos are a bit simplistic and don't cover the finer points of a topic. For example, his explanation about how dielectrics work is not that good.

Dr Physics A does some quite good revision videos where he recaps an entire topics like AS Electricity in just half an hour.

Use an old physics book like the one in the picture below or A Level Physics by Roger Muncaster.

The best way to find hard questions is go and physics and maths tutor and scroll through some of his topic by topic question sheets looking for hard questions. If you are feeling brave, go to http://i-want-to-study-engineering.org or https://isaacphysics.org. Both of those sites contain questions which Oxford and Cambridge use to test their physics and engineering applicants. Most of the questions are way more difficult than anything you will ever encounter on an A Level physics paper. Another way to find hard questions is by doing the Oxford PAT papers.

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Adam_1999
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The reason why our new exams are linear and really hard is because of Michael Gove.
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Teenage Hype
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(Original post by Adam_1999)
He is good if you don't know anything about a certain topic, and need to relearn it. The problem with him is that sometimes his videos are a bit simplistic and don't cover the finer points of a topic. For example, his explanation about how dielectrics work is not that good.

Dr Physics A does some quite good revision videos where he recaps an entire topics like AS Electricity in just half an hour.

Use an old physics book like the one in the picture below or A Level Physics by Roger Muncaster.

The best way to find hard questions is go and physics and maths tutor and scroll through some of his topic by topic question sheets looking for hard questions. If you are feeling brave, go to http://i-want-to-study-engineering.org or https://isaacphysics.org. Both of those sites contain questions which Oxford and Cambridge use to test their physics and engineering applicants. Most of the questions are way more difficult than anything you will ever encounter on an A Level physics paper. Another way to find hard questions is by doing the Oxford PAT papers.

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Thanks so much!

Would you recommend doing questions by topic or a whole paper in one go? I feel I would lose knowledge if I just did it topic by topic, but on the flip side it would be more in depth. Are you looking to study physics at uni btw?
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Adam_1999
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I want to study engineering.

The answer to your question is to do both.

Do questions topic by topic but ONLY on topics you struggle with. For example, I find EM induction (especially Lenz's Law) the hardest topic in A level physics.

Do say, 3 past papers, mark them and see if there is a specific topic which you struggle on. Revise the topic using a book or videos then do specific questions on that topic from physics and maths tutor.
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Adam_1999
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I remember seeing many people on TSR after as level paper 1 last June saying that they did all of the old past papers, but it didn't help.

If you see a really hard question you can't do, I would skip it, and come back to it later. You'll look at the question in a different light and it will just click.
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Teenage Hype
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(Original post by Adam_1999)
I want to study engineering.

The answer to your question is to do both.

Do questions topic by topic but ONLY on topics you struggle with. For example, I find EM induction (especially Lenz's Law) the hardest topic in A level physics.

Do say, 3 past papers, mark them and see if there is a specific topic which you struggle on. Revise the topic using a book or videos then do specific questions on that topic from physics and maths tutor.
Great. I hate being forced to do papers for the sake of it. I prefer actually making progress but doing hard questions on topics I struggle with.

I also find Lenz's Law one of the hardest topics. I believe Lenz's Law is there because of conservation of energy. Can you explain why energy is conserved when you move a magnet through a copper tube and it slows down? So the magnet loses kinetic energy, but what causes the initial increase in energy to ensure conservation of energy (if I'm making sense)? This is something that I struggle to understand.

As well as this, do you know why if Lenz's law didn't exist there would be forever increasing flux? I understand the initial increase in flux, but I don't understand why it would lead to more current, then more flux (leading to an infinite cycle)
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Adam_1999
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Oh and you need to be able to know how solve multiple choice questions. Your approach should never be to find the right answer, but to find the wrong ones and eliminate. Read the question carefully - there might be a "what answer among the following is NOT correct?" and you may miss the NOT.

Two more things. You need to be able pull relationships from equations. A question might ask this:
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You need to be able to see that you need E = 0.5Q^2/C and Q = CV. Q is directly proportional to V so increasing Q by 1.5 increases V by 1.5. Once you have done, this ELIMINATE B and D. You know they are wrong.

E directly proportional to V^2 so 1.5^2 = 2.25. From each of these results we can see that C is the correct answer.
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Adam_1999
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When you drop a magnet down a tube, the copper tube cuts the magnetic flux lines created by the magnet so an emf is induce. Because the tube is a complete circuit, a current flows through the tube. This current will then induce a magnetic field of its own.

Now, lenz's law states the direction of the induced emf will be in such a direction as to oppose the change in magnetic flux that created it. The change that induced the emf is the manget falling down the tube. Because of this, induced magnetic field will be such a direction as to repel the falling magnet upwards.

The magnetic creates electrical energy in the pipe, but the current in the pipe creates a magnetic field that slows the magnet down. For every 1J of electrical energy created in the pipe, the opposing magnetic field causes the magnet to lose 1 J of kinetic energy. That is is how Lenz's law works: if the induced current didn't flow in such a direction as to oppose the falling magnet, energy would not be conserved.

Don't ask me why the current reverses direction after the magnetic falls half way through the tube; that answer involves 1st year university physics.

I don't understand what your second question. Suppose Lenz's law doesn't exist. In order for there to be ever increasing flux that magnet would have to fall through that rube for ever. This would not happen; the flux linkage in the copper tube would stop once the magnet fell out. Could you support your question with an example?
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