Neurotransmitters? Is Noradrenaline the primary neurotransmitter for the sympathetic?

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TheAlphaParticle
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Is Noradrenaline the primary neurotransmitter for the sympathetic nervous system?? Isn't noradrenaline an inhibitory neurotransmitter, so isn't the fact that the sympathetic nervous system (which aids physical activity) uses it a bit counterintuitive
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Gerry-Atricks
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(Original post by TheAlphaParticle)
Is Noradrenaline the primary neurotransmitter for the sympathetic nervous system?? Isn't noradrenaline an inhibitory neurotransmitter, so isn't the fact that the sympathetic nervous system (which aids physical activity) a bit counterintuitive
I think it depends on location in the body "The general function of norepinephrine is to mobilize the brain and body for action. Norepinephrine release is lowest during sleep, rises during wakefulness, and reaches much higher levels during situations of stress or danger, in the so-called fight-or-flight response. In the brain, norepinephrine increases arousal and alertness, promotes vigilance, enhances formation and retrieval of memory, and focuses attention; it also increases restlessness and anxiety. In the rest of the body, norepinephrine increases heart rate and blood pressure, triggers the release of glucose from energy stores, increases blood flow to skeletal muscle, reduces blood flow to the gastrointestinal system, and inhibits voiding of the bladder and gastrointestinal motility."

so it can be inhibitory in digestive system but is predominantly excitatory- fight or flight- just how acetylcholine is predominantly inhibitory but can stimulate digestive system-rest and digest
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TheAlphaParticle
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(Original post by glad-he-ate-her)
I think it depends on location in the body "The general function of norepinephrine is to mobilize the brain and body for action. Norepinephrine release is lowest during sleep, rises during wakefulness, and reaches much higher levels during situations of stress or danger, in the so-called fight-or-flight response. In the brain, norepinephrine increases arousal and alertness, promotes vigilance, enhances formation and retrieval of memory, and focuses attention; it also increases restlessness and anxiety. In the rest of the body, norepinephrine increases heart rate and blood pressure, triggers the release of glucose from energy stores, increases blood flow to skeletal muscle, reduces blood flow to the gastrointestinal system, and inhibits voiding of the bladder and gastrointestinal motility."

so it can be inhibitory in digestive system but is predominantly excitatory- fight or flight- just how acetylcholine is predominantly inhibitory but can stimulate digestive system-rest and digest
Thanks a lot for this, was really confused before
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