future dentists- what do you want to specialize in?

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username2920378
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Im quite interested in maxillofacial surgery bc working in a hospital is very appealing, but the long years of education are slightly off putting
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Snufkin
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I imagine most want to specialise in ripping off the public and making lots of money.

...or am I too cynical?
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username2752874
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(Original post by Snufkin)
I imagine most want to specialise in ripping off the public and making lots of money.

...or am I too cynical?
Lol - blame the damn Hollywood-fuelled cosmetic industry
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Dento5
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(Original post by Snufkin)
I imagine most want to specialise in ripping off the public and making lots of money.

...or am I too cynical?
Just a bit
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Kartace
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(Original post by Snufkin)
I imagine most want to specialise in ripping off the public and making lots of money.

...or am I too cynical?
Dentistry is just a very expensive thing to perform though. The materials involve precious metals such as gold/platinum and crowns/dentures are all custom made prosthetic medical devices that require a technician hours to make. There's a reason that NHS dentistry isn't completely free. It's because it would cripple the service if the country footed all of the bill. I would love to be able to do the best treatment possible for my patient without them paying a penny, but it's just completely unrealistic unfortunately. Given that periodontal disease/caries are the two most common disease in the world. People are always going to need to be seeing dentists more often than doctors. As for the increasing privatization of NHS dentistry...i think we can thank the tory government for ushering that along unfortunately. Things are also about to get much much worse, especially with the new dental contract looming (remember the junior doctors contract?). Confidence is at an all-time low and unlike in medicine, dentists have the option to (relatively easily) move straight into the private sector where they get paid fairly for what they do and don't have some of the ridiculous pressures that the current UDA contract has.

Just as a quick example:
Patient A needs 1 filling
Dentist: "thank you, that'll be 56.30 please"

Patient B needs 3 fillings, 2 root canals, 5 extractions and a scale and polish
Dentist: " thank you, that'll be 56.30 please"

The system is so incredibly flawed that you are often forced to do treatment for free OR lie about the presence of disease (Supervised neglect) it only comes down to your own moral compass. Not to mention the fact that if you do too little treatment in a contract year, that next year you won't be given as big a contract. However, if you do too much, you'll be investigated and scrutinised and even if they decide that you're not gaming the system, they just say "thanks for the extra work you've done" but don't pay you for it.

As for cosmetic dentistry, you pay a premium for cosmetic treatments the world over, whether it's moisturisers, anti-aging cream, botox, face lift, breat augmentations or bleaching and veneers.

/rant
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Kartace
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(Original post by rameow)
Im quite interested in maxillofacial surgery bc working in a hospital is very appealing, but the long years of education are slightly off putting
Maxfax or restorative dentistry for me. But to be honest I'm likely to completely change my mind. I used to be dead-set on maxfax but having done some other bits of dentistry and having grown up a bit. I've realised that the quality of life and remuneration you get from maxfax are not proportional to the effort, money and work you have to put into it. Not to mention the personal sacrifices.

Most people don't specialise though, but this doesn't mean stagnating and not gaining specialist skills. There are plenty of really good courses out there for those general dentists who want to enhance what they do and grow as clinicians outside the university environment.

I would say that after your DFT year, do a DCT post and that will give you a much better insight into the workings of the different specialties (especially maxfax).
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username2920378
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(Original post by Kartace)
Maxfax or restorative dentistry for me. But to be honest I'm likely to completely change my mind. I used to be dead-set on maxfax but having done some other bits of dentistry and having grown up a bit. I've realised that the quality of life and remuneration you get from maxfax are not proportional to the effort, money and work you have to put into it. Not to mention the personal sacrifices.

Most people don't specialise though, but this doesn't mean stagnating and not gaining specialist skills. There are plenty of really good courses out there for those general dentists who want to enhance what they do and grow as clinicians outside the university environment.

I would say that after your DFT year, do a DCT post and that will give you a much better insight into the workings of the different specialties (especially maxfax).


i am a bit lacking with work experience so thats probably why im biased hehe. Thank you for your advice, do you mind me asking what DFT and DCT years are?
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Kartace
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(Original post by rameow)
i am a bit lacking with work experience so thats probably why im biased hehe. Thank you for your advice, do you mind me asking what DFT and DCT years are?
Hey there.

DFT - Dental foundation training (The first year after 5th year in general dental practice setting)
DCT - Dental core training (The years after DFT, made up of DCT 1,2 & 3, these are in a hospital setting)

DFT is compulsary if you want to work in the NHS.
DCT is optional but more or less essential if you want to specialise, it's also very popular amongst those wanting to go into general practice but are looking to advance skills in certain areas such as oral surgery)
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