How do I stop writing about characters as if they are real?

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Iqla
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I'm currently studying Aspects of Tragedy in King Lear, Keats, The Great Gatsby, and Death of a Salesman. Since exams are soon, it's just essay after essay but I keep getting the same feedback that I write about characters as if they are real, and I don't know how to stop doing it. I don't even realise I'm doing it in the first place!
Any tips to help me would be greatly appreciated!
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999tigger
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(Original post by Iqla)
I'm currently studying Aspects of Tragedy in King Lear, Keats, The Great Gatsby, and Death of a Salesman. Since exams are soon, it's just essay after essay but I keep getting the same feedback that I write about characters as if they are real, and I don't know how to stop doing it. I don't even realise I'm doing it in the first place!
Any tips to help me would be greatly appreciated!
Hard to know, but your essays probably point out you arent objective enough and that you get too involved with the characters as if you are writing about real living people, when in fact they are just fictional. If you have it pointed out repeatedly, thenit must be noticieable. Why not just put in "the character King Lear" just do it every now and then. You might also need to emphasise what the author i.e Shakespeare is doing with his characters. If you treat them as real people, then it removes the authors role as creating and defining them as part of the play or the book.
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Hayyz91
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make sure you use phrases like "the writer intended to potray..." instead of " whoever felt..."
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899071
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Make sure that your focus is on what the author wanted to portray rather than what happens specifically within the text. If I ever catch myself doing this I think about why the character is doing/ saying/ thinking in this way and change my phrasing accordingly (i.e. Rather than "The storm reflects Lear's confusion and anger", "Shakespeare's choice to display a storm on stage reflects Lear's confusion and anger for the audience" etc.)
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