Roman hang Limbu
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Attachment 641078someone please help me with this question... ANSWER IS 58% Increase. But i really don't get how you interpret these ECGs
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Roman hang Limbu
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(Original post by Roman hang Limbu)
Attachment 641078someone please help me with this question... ANSWER IS 58% Increase. But i really don't get how you interpret these ECGs
My attempt: first ecg= 6 beats in 4.92 s ( i counted all the peaks and worked out there was 25 small boxes so i did 0.2x25= 4.92) and then this will equal to 73.2 beats per min which is not right because it is 78 beats per min. And i did similar thing with the second ecg aswell.
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OxFossil
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You need to know that one beat is represented on the chart by the interval between two similar features on the ECG. The easiest marker is probably the big spike.
Using this knowledge:
1. Count the number of beats in the marked sections of each ECG (there are roughly 6 in each)
2. Count the time this occurs over (by counting the number of 0.2 second boxes in the marked sections)
3. In each case, divide the number of beats by the time. This gives you the heart rate of the two patients.
4. Express the higher rate as a percentage of the lower one.
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Roman hang Limbu
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(Original post by OxFossil)
You need to know that one beat is represented on the chart by the interval between two similar features on the ECG. The easiest marker is probably the big spike.
Using this knowledge:
1. Count the number of beats in the marked sections of each ECG (there are roughly 6 in each)
2. Count the time this occurs over (by counting the number of 0.2 second boxes in the marked sections)
3. In each case, divide the number of beats by the time. This gives you the heart rate of the two patients.
4. Express the higher rate as a percentage of the lower one.
Thankyou for replying!
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