How to structure answers? AQA English Literature GCSE Watch

Arayan01
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It's pretty late to be asking this I know, but my teacher still hasn't covered how to correctly structure a response to a question. If anyone has a specific structure that'll push me into the higher bands I'd appreciate it - thanks.
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dragonkeeper999
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(Original post by Arayan01)
It's pretty late to be asking this I know, but my teacher still hasn't covered how to correctly structure a response to a question. If anyone has a specific structure that'll push me into the higher bands I'd appreciate it - thanks.
We were always taught "PQE" - Point, Quote, Explanation. Basically, each paragraph should start off with your main point, followed by a quote/ evidence supporting your point, then a more in-depth explanation as to how this quote supports your point and any additional comments relating to it.

Depending on the length of the answer expected, after a few paragraphs summarising your main points, write a concluding paragraph where you bring the points together and state your main conclusion
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Arayan01
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(Original post by dragonkeeper999)
We were always taught "PQE" - Point, Quote, Explanation. Basically, each paragraph should start off with your main point, followed by a quote/ evidence supporting your point, then a more in-depth explanation as to how this quote supports your point and any additional comments relating to it.

Depending on the length of the answer expected, after a few paragraphs summarising your main points, write a concluding paragraph where you bring the points together and state your main conclusion
Thank you!
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pineapplepizza
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(Original post by Arayan01)
It's pretty late to be asking this I know, but my teacher still hasn't covered how to correctly structure a response to a question. If anyone has a specific structure that'll push me into the higher bands I'd appreciate it - thanks.
Hey, I use something called PEEWRA. (Point Evidence quote or reference, Explain Word analysis, Reader and Alternative meaning if there is one)

For my essays I always do an introduction, in this I include context and the writers intentions about their messages and how they want to influence the reader or audience. Then I chose a few ideas to answer the question and write about 4 detailed PEEWRA paragraphs ensuring my paragraphs link together.
A few of these paragraphs will be about the extract given (in lit paper 1)
They always ask to refer to the play or book as a whole, so i advise you do your essay in chronological order, fitting in the extract depending on where abouts it occurs.
Finally I conclude binding my ideas all together and ensuring it links to the question.

But I highly recommend you plan your answers, this way your ideas are already there and all you have to do is compose it into an essay.

Hope this helps and good luck!
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ariellabenaim
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(Original post by pineapplepizza)
Hey, I use something called PEEWRA. (Point Evidence quote or reference, Explain Word analysis, Reader and Alternative meaning if there is one)

For my essays I always do an introduction, in this I include context and the writers intentions about their messages and how they want to influence the reader or audience. Then I chose a few ideas to answer the question and write about 4 detailed PEEWRA paragraphs ensuring my paragraphs link together.
A few of these paragraphs will be about the extract given (in lit paper 1)
They always ask to refer to the play or book as a whole, so i advise you do your essay in chronological order, fitting in the extract depending on where abouts it occurs.
Finally I conclude binding my ideas all together and ensuring it links to the question.

But I highly recommend you plan your answers, this way your ideas are already there and all you have to do is compose it into an essay.

Hope this helps and good luck!
You've really helped me! This is so useful! Thank you! By any chance, do you have any practice questions/ plans for any literature questions that you can send me?

Thank you again
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pineapplepizza
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(Original post by ariellabenaim)
You've really helped me! This is so useful! Thank you! By any chance, do you have any practice questions/ plans for any literature questions that you can send me?

Thank you again
of course I can, just message me the books and plays you are studying then I will give you a question and show you how I would plan it
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ravia2081
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(Original post by pineapplepizza)
of course I can, just message me the books and plays you are studying then I will give you a question and show you how I would plan it
Hi, i know this is kind of late, but do you reckon you could help me out too?? I do The Merchant of Venice, Jekyll and Hyde and the Lord of the Flies

Thank you!!
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Graceling200216
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my daughter is really struggling on how to structure her answers for questions on MacBeth she knows about PEEWRA but is finding it difficult to get the right information into the answers. Any advice would be appreciate.
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Kieran S15
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(Original post by Graceling200216)
my daughter is really struggling on how to structure her answers for questions on MacBeth she knows about PEEWRA but is finding it difficult to get the right information into the answers. Any advice would be appreciate.
First of all she should make her point, for example: Shakespeare presents Macbeths state of mind in the extract. He does this using (insert language technique) (insert quote). Next analyse the word(s) involved in the technique, its effect on the reader, context etc. If she can she should try to link this to other themes in the play, in this case possibly guilt or the supernatural. Finally she should give an alternative view if possible. This process should then be repeated. REMEMBER YOU MUST MENTION AT LEAST 1 STRUCTURAL TECHNIQUE AND 1 LANGUAGE TECHNIQUE (this hits I believe A01 giving loads more marks). Structure is difficult, she should probably look up different structure techniques such as Iambic pentameter. Sorry this is so late but I hope it has helped.
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Kieran S15
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(Original post by Kieran S15)
First of all she should make her point, for example: Shakespeare presents Macbeths state of mind in the extract. He does this using (insert language technique) (insert quote). Next analyse the word(s) involved in the technique, its effect on the reader, context etc. If she can she should try to link this to other themes in the play, in this case possibly guilt or the supernatural. Finally she should give an alternative view if possible. This process should then be repeated. REMEMBER YOU MUST MENTION AT LEAST 1 STRUCTURAL TECHNIQUE AND 1 LANGUAGE TECHNIQUE (this hits I believe A01 giving loads more marks). Structure is difficult, she should probably look up different structure techniques such as Iambic pentameter. Sorry this is so late but I hope it has helped.
https://www.stokenewingtonschool.co.uk/asset/1911
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wossddsdfdfe
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i tried your advice and wrote this paragraph is it okIn the play Macbeth, Shakespeare presents ambition as a form of corruption through its consequences. The use of contrast in the character Macbeth emphasises the destruction it can cause. This is highlighted in 'For brave Macbeth, well he deserved that name' portraying Macbeths honour and dignity to be his dominant features towards the start of the play. The adjective 'brave' highlights Macbeths high status and respect which is also discussed through other characters description of Macbeth as 'noble' and ‘valiant’. However, the use of the past tense ‘deserved' foreshadows that this attribute will be lost. In contrast, by the end of the play Macbeths corrupted mindset is dramatically portrayed through, ‘o full of scorpions is mind dear wife.' The extremely horrific animalistic imagery suggests that Macbeth no longer obtains the endeavouring qualities that he portrayed at the start of the play and has a fragmented confused mindset. This is further shown in ‘is this a dagger which I see before me? The handle toward my hand. Come let me clutch thee.’ Shakespeare uses multiple caesura to show Macbeths fragmented mind. Furthermore, the rhetorical question used in his dialogue suggests that he is hallucinating and therefore portraying Macbeths loss of control and the alliteration of the letter ‘C’ highlights Macbeths own disgust at his actions. Therefore, the use of contrast between Macbeths character highlights the effect of ambition in the play.
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Kieran S15
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(Original post by wossddsdfdfe)
i tried your advice and wrote this paragraph is it okIn the play Macbeth, Shakespeare presents ambition as a form of corruption through its consequences. The use of contrast in the character Macbeth emphasises the destruction it can cause. This is highlighted in 'For brave Macbeth, well he deserved that name' portraying Macbeths honour and dignity to be his dominant features towards the start of the play. The adjective 'brave' highlights Macbeths high status and respect which is also discussed through other characters description of Macbeth as 'noble' and ‘valiant’. However, the use of the past tense ‘deserved' foreshadows that this attribute will be lost. In contrast, by the end of the play Macbeths corrupted mindset is dramatically portrayed through, ‘o full of scorpions is mind dear wife.' The extremely horrific animalistic imagery suggests that Macbeth no longer obtains the endeavouring qualities that he portrayed at the start of the play and has a fragmented confused mindset. This is further shown in ‘is this a dagger which I see before me? The handle toward my hand. Come let me clutch thee.’ Shakespeare uses multiple caesura to show Macbeths fragmented mind. Furthermore, the rhetorical question used in his dialogue suggests that he is hallucinating and therefore portraying Macbeths loss of control and the alliteration of the letter ‘C’ highlights Macbeths own disgust at his actions. Therefore, the use of contrast between Macbeths character highlights the effect of ambition in the play.
That is very good, defo band 5/6 I would say, much better than what I can do anyway. Assuming you have English tomorrow, good luck believe in yourself and you will be fine.
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wossddsdfdfe
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Thanks a lot. i honestly really appreciate it. good luck to you tomorrow as well
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