sparkle_fairy
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I'm 20 years old and not allowed to go to any appointments by myself because my parents won't let me. They say that I lack capacity to make my own decisions and that they need to be there to hear what has been said.

I'm not going to get anywhere with them sat next to me because I'm never going to open up about most things - I was getting somewhere with my old therapist (because my parents didn't come) but then a few incidents happened and my parents have changed their mind so I have no choice apparently.

I'm pretty sure that I do have capacity to make my own decisions - no one else seems to think I don't, although my GP has hinted... what happens if the GP says that I don't have capacity?

Also, I do have a right to go alone and to ask my parents to leave, don't I?
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fxlloutboyy
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Just don't tell them about the appointments? You could ask your GP their opinion also

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ddrrzzeerr
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You have capacity. You are an adult.

I'm surprised the doctors haven't made this clear to you. When I have been to hospital doctors have specifically said "I'm going to ask you some questions now, would you prefer it i your parents weren't here?" I thought that is a standard thing for them to ask.

You should absolutely put your foot down and not have your parents with you if you would be more open with the doctor.

As far as I know, the only way a doctor can decide that you don't have capacity is if they section you under the mental health act which isn't something done lightly. They don't do it if they think you are making unwise decisions, only if you are incapable because of mental illness to do so.

Be open with your doctors about this issue. Letting patients make their own decisions is a cornerstone of medical ethics. The will be on your side on this.
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Noodlzzz
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(Original post by Sternumator)
You have capacity. You are an adult.

I'm surprised the doctors haven't made this clear to you. When I have been to hospital doctors have specifically said "I'm going to ask you some questions now, would you prefer it i your parents weren't here?" I thought that is a standard thing for them to ask.

You should absolutely put your foot down and not have your parents with you if you would be more open with the doctor.

As far as I know, the only way a doctor can decide that you don't have capacity is if they section you under the mental health act which isn't something done lightly. They don't do it if they think you are making unwise decisions, only if you are incapable because of mental illness to do so.

Be open with your doctors about this issue. Letting patients make their own decisions is a cornerstone of medical ethics. The will be on your side on this.
Just to put in, I've been told I've lacked capacity a number of times in the community when I've been acutely unwell.
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username861942
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(Original post by sparkle_fairy)
I'm 20 years old and not allowed to go to any appointments by myself because my parents won't let me. They say that I lack capacity to make my own decisions and that they need to be there to hear what has been said.

I'm not going to get anywhere with them sat next to me because I'm never going to open up about most things - I was getting somewhere with my old therapist (because my parents didn't come) but then a few incidents happened and my parents have changed their mind so I have no choice apparently.

I'm pretty sure that I do have capacity to make my own decisions - no one else seems to think I don't, although my GP has hinted... what happens if the GP says that I don't have capacity?

Also, I do have a right to go alone and to ask my parents to leave, don't I?
Personally, I do think that you have the right to see someone alone, capacity or not. And I think that any professional worth their weight would give you the option to have an appointment by yourself.

Have they (parents or GP) said why they feel you lack capacity? From the point of view of the Mental Capacity Act, a lack of capacity must be established via a thorough assessment, which it doesn't sound like has happened. Someone can also not assume that you lack capacity just because you have a mental illness, or because you make a decision that they disagree with, or feel is the wrong decision.

Even if you do lack capacity to understand the information, it is important to remember that you have a right to privacy, and having an appointment by yourself is your right. If your parents are that concerned then they can be filled in after, if the professional feels it is appropriate, whilst respecting your confidentiality.

Your parents alone cannot say you lack lack capacity as they are not able to carry out the assessment. I would ask your GP or other professional the next time you see them about getting a formal capacity assessment to settle this issue with your parents.
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username2835262
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If you are unable to open up fully because of your family being present, lacking capacity or not, you should be able to have an appointment alone. If it is just your family who believe that you lack capacity then you have every right to go to the appointment by yourself, it's just stopping your family from forcing their way in which may or may not be difficult.
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username2911200
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(Original post by Sternumator)
You have capacity. You are an adult.

I'm surprised the doctors haven't made this clear to you. When I have been to hospital doctors have specifically said "I'm going to ask you some questions now, would you prefer it i your parents weren't here?" I thought that is a standard thing for them to ask.

You should absolutely put your foot down and not have your parents with you if you would be more open with the doctor.

As far as I know, the only way a doctor can decide that you don't have capacity is if they section you under the mental health act which isn't something done lightly. They don't do it if they think you are making unwise decisions, only if you are incapable because of mental illness to do so.

Be open with your doctors about this issue. Letting patients make their own decisions is a cornerstone of medical ethics. The will be on your side on this.
Not all adults have capacity, at all. Many adults have mental health conditions which stop them having capacity, but allow them to function 'normally' on other levels, like making a post about it on the internet. The OP may have already undergone a capacity assessment, not understood or retained the assessment and its result, and as a result needs to have their parents with them at all appointments in order for medical practitioners to provide safe care.
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