hodxn
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I do Biology,Chemistry, Maths and Geography at A-Level. I was wondering how 'maths' is Chemistry degrees and if there are any Chemsitry with Maths degrees.
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black1blade
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I think I did see one at plymouth or maybe it was southhampton once when I was going thru ucas at school. I do agree that chemistry and maths are definitely the best a-levels however there's probably more of a spectrum in terms of inter-connectivity that is: chemisty links to physics and maths links to physics. There is definitely maths in chemistry, just look at boltzmann distribution at AS, but it's less of a focus as it in in physics.
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black1blade
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Actually if you wanted maths + chemistry then chemical engineering would be the best choice.
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artful_lounger
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Southampton has one. Most natural science courses would let you combine the two. There's also chemical physics which, while less common, is more mathematical than the average chemistry degree.

It really depends on the flavour of the degree; more physical/theoretical chemistry oriented courses (or which have those options and research groups in the department so someone is teaching the courses) will by virtue of this require more maths. More synthetic oriented ones don't really require or use it as much.

Often you might get introduced to some basic group theory in higher level inorganic modules, and in physical you'll at least need a basic introduction to vector calculus (and by extension multivariable calculus and a good background in vectors and maybe a touch of linear algebra proper), differential equations, and complex numbers to cope with the quantum chemistry stuff and the Schroedinger eq. Some might like to do the matrix version of things and will include that as well.

None of this is really considered "maths" in the sense of university level maths; these mathematical methods are useful in this context but uni level maths typically concerns itself with the underlying mechanics of the calculus at play here (and fundamental algebra for that matter) which a joint honours type course would include more of. The usefulness of this as a career chemist is somewhat limited in industry and debatable in academia (depending very much on your area of research, and even then only the more theoretical physical stuff uses that extensively, and most of those people were physicists rather than chemists).

You'll probably find you'll have to do some maths modules as methods type courses and this is more in line with the type of stuff you've done at A-level (and probably enjoyed), and you may have the option to take some more courses in this vein if you so choose as optional modules. For example, again with southampton, I'm fairly certain you have to do one maths methods course in first year, and you can do a second if you want. If you do both first year ones, you can do one in second year, and potentially pick up a couple of the more methodsy/applied maths courses from that as options beyond that.
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dragonkeeper999
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(Original post by hodxn)
I do Biology,Chemistry, Maths and Geography at A-Level. I was wondering how 'maths' is Chemistry degrees and if there are any Chemsitry with Maths degrees.
There is a fair amount of maths in a chemistry degree if you want it - pretty much all the physical chemistry stuff (lots of theoretical stuff to do with orbitals, wave functions, QM, etc. plus things like kinetics) is highly mathematical, although it's generally quite applied. I have to admit I'm not a huge fan of maths so managed to avoid most of those modules though...

If you really like the applied maths stuff (or even the more theoretical, abstract stuff) then physics might be worth looking into too
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by black1blade)
Actually if you wanted maths + chemistry then chemical engineering would be the best choice.
Chemical engineering will cover very different topics to chemistry and maths (and chemical physics/chemistry with physics, or physics itself for that matter).

While of course there are common threads ChemE will be a lot of applied fluid mechanics and thermodynamics/kinetics, chemistry will some of the latter, along with inorganic and organic chem and quantum chemistry.

Chemical physics will focus on the thermo and quantum aspects of chemistry as they relate to chemistry in general (typically inorganic and materials chem more than organic chemistry).

Of course in that vein there's also materials science which on a tokenistic level includes stuff from a chemistry and maths background.

They also all train for different roles (while all could be used as a springboard to academia, chemical physics/chemistry with physics is probably stronger there if you plan on going into physical chemistry academia compared to any other).

Chemistry with maths is probably the odd one of the bunch as in this context it's essentially two separate subjects combined, and the overlap is up to you to find moreso than the others. If you have long term DISCRETE interests in the two, that's certainly a viable choice. If you just like doing things in a quantitative way using mathematical tools then picking up maths methods courses in a general chemistry degree, or looking at chemical physics/chemistry with physics would probably be more appropriate.
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alow
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(Original post by hodxn)
I do Biology,Chemistry, Maths and Geography at A-Level. I was wondering how 'maths' is Chemistry degrees and if there are any Chemsitry with Maths degrees.
For NatSci at Cambridge you can do as much or as little maths with chemistry as you want. Up to 2nd year you can do the same maths module as the physicists and in 3rd year there are lots of theoretical and physical chemistry modules covering things like Electronic Structure (so Hartree-Fock, some perturbation theory and Density Functional theory), Statistical Mechanics and Symmetry.

Have you considered any physics/chemical physics courses? They would undoubtedly be more maths-heavy than almost all straight chemistry degrees.

(Original post by black1blade)
Actually if you wanted maths + chemistry then chemical engineering would be the best choice.
Just no. Chemical Engineering will have very little chemistry.
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