Jenness
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
Hey all,
Like many, exams coming up soon. im doing loads of revision but none of it is going in. my major issue is the Research studies, theres like 1000,000,000!! (hella accurate) I dont know whether im trying to learn too many, but I just dont see how they can expect us to learn anywhere near even half the content. How are people learning the studies? how many studies are you learning? I will literally do anything to get these things in my head, but even when i spend hours writing notes and looking at them, even doing 16 markers, its just rebounding.
Please help
Thanks to all.
By the way im using the Hodder education AQA alevel psychology books by Jean-Marc Lawton and Eleanor Willard
0
reply
Michael_Fishy
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 years ago
#2
Learn every study named on the specification, every study you've been taught as evaluation - scrap it. Use issuse and debates, ethics and studys named on the spec for AO3 instead, it is so much easier.

For example: Bowlby's theory of attachment
- Schafer and Emerson - Disuptes the idea of a single primary attachment figure as a high proportion of those they studied had dual/shared attachment
- Learning theory - completly different view of attachment, sugests that it is totally learned instead of innate like Bowlby sugests
- Bowlby falls on the nature side of nature -nurture - Belives that social releases and the response to them are innate behaviour. issue as it rules out any potential for learning.
- Reductionistic - Views attachment as simply a action and response through social releases - does not account for a hollistic view of all factors
+ Harlow supports - Comfort mother=responding to social releases

There, 5 different evaluation points without mentioning a study on the spec, give me any essay title (apart from biopsych as it doesn't specify any studys iirc?) and I can do this, so brush up on issues and debates, focus on learning the spec studys, and you can too.

As for learning the studys themselves. Flash cards and essay writing. Basically get an essay title, and write what you can. Then go back to the textbook, flick through the whole section and see what else you can add. Do this for every essay, then re do it.
It's a lot of work I know, probably about an hour per essay but it's not complex to do, and after you do it a couple times you get into the rhythm of it. Be time savvy and focus on paper one and Issues & Debates first s, and you;ll get there,

I'm happy to mark some of your essays if you want, but I'm not gonna guarantee that I'll be totally accurate with my marking, but I'll try to err on the side of the harsh.

I'm an A grade student at AS, predicted an A* this year, so those are my credentials and experience :P
0
reply
roisinroisin
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#3
Report 4 years ago
#3
(Original post by Michael_Fishy)
Learn every study named on the specification, every study you've been taught as evaluation - scrap it. Use issuse and debates, ethics and studys named on the spec for AO3 instead, it is so much easier.

For example: Bowlby's theory of attachment
- Schafer and Emerson - Disuptes the idea of a single primary attachment figure as a high proportion of those they studied had dual/shared attachment
- Learning theory - completly different view of attachment, sugests that it is totally learned instead of innate like Bowlby sugests
- Bowlby falls on the nature side of nature -nurture - Belives that social releases and the response to them are innate behaviour. issue as it rules out any potential for learning.
- Reductionistic - Views attachment as simply a action and response through social releases - does not account for a hollistic view of all factors
+ Harlow supports - Comfort mother=responding to social releases

There, 5 different evaluation points without mentioning a study on the spec, give me any essay title (apart from biopsych as it doesn't specify any studys iirc?) and I can do this, so brush up on issues and debates, focus on learning the spec studys, and you can too.

As for learning the studys themselves. Flash cards and essay writing. Basically get an essay title, and write what you can. Then go back to the textbook, flick through the whole section and see what else you can add. Do this for every essay, then re do it.
It's a lot of work I know, probably about an hour per essay but it's not complex to do, and after you do it a couple times you get into the rhythm of it. Be time savvy and focus on paper one and Issues & Debates first s, and you;ll get there,

I'm happy to mark some of your essays if you want, but I'm not gonna guarantee that I'll be totally accurate with my marking, but I'll try to err on the side of the harsh.

I'm an A grade student at AS, predicted an A* this year, so those are my credentials and experience :P
I'm not discrediting your views, but isn't the best way to aim for top marks is to evaluate with other researchers? My teacher keeps telling us that 16 markers are marked hollistically, not just by the amount of points you make, and therefore one with lots of external references will have more depth than one that states how a theory lacks in validity.

I think one of the best ways of learning studies is by flashcards with researchers' names and key statistics. I use Memrise for that where I make my own flashcards for precise invofmation. I also find it useful to sumarise each evaluation point into one word and then making a five letter anagram of all the evaluation to help trigger the rest of the information. Hope this made sense and helps and good luck with your exams
1
reply
Michael_Fishy
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 years ago
#4
(Original post by roisinroisin)
I'm not discrediting your views, but isn't the best way to aim for top marks is to evaluate with other researchers? My teacher keeps telling us that 16 markers are marked hollistically, not just by the amount of points you make, and therefore one with lots of external references will have more depth than one that states how a theory lacks in validity.

I think one of the best ways of learning studies is by flashcards with researchers' names and key statistics. I use Memrise for that where I make my own flashcards for precise invofmation. I also find it useful to sumarise each evaluation point into one word and then making a five letter anagram of all the evaluation to help trigger the rest of the information. Hope this made sense and helps and good luck with your exams
There different approaches to how to do the 16 markers, especially since it's a new spec
And yeah, since they're marked holistically it's better to have in depth evaluation but at the same time you need to strike a balance - one evaluation point is not going to get you very far. You can get a lot of depth out of the issues and debates i you try hard enough, and if you use other studies mentioned on the spec then you can utilise that for in depth evaluation as well.
Like I say, different ways of doing things - either of our methods work, and I'm sure the examiners will afford us leeway for that when it comes to marking since it's a new spec
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What's worrying you most about starting back at school/college this year?

The potential for Covid to keep disrupting things (109)
14.53%
My mental health (110)
14.67%
Feeling behind academically (142)
18.93%
Making friends/social anxiety (135)
18%
How to organise myself (25)
3.33%
How to revise/study effectively (89)
11.87%
Future career, uni, pathway planning and applications (125)
16.67%
Something else - let us know in the thread (15)
2%

Watched Threads

View All