Colour vision and science at secondary school

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Arran90
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Many science and engineering careers are only open to people with perfect colour vision. They have to correctly recognise the number on every Ishihara plate.

Colour vision testing is normally carried out some time during KS2. Anybody who fails to recognise every number is told that they can't become a train driver or (incorrectly) a pilot.

Should children who fail the colour vision test be exempt from having to take science at secondary school and instead be allowed spend more time on subjects that don't require perfect colour vision such as business studies or music?

An interesting finding is that a few years ago all of the male electronic engineering students at a high-ranking university took a colour vision test and the number that did not have perfect colour vision was so few that they could be counted on the fingers of one hand. Therefore it is plausible that this is a result of large numbers of children who fail the colour vision test being advised not to study an electrical subject in higher education. All of the male computing and IT students at a former polytechnic took a colour vision test and just under 6% of them did not have perfect colour vision. Slightly lower than the national average.

Note: The vast majority of people who fail the colour vision test have no problems recognising and discriminating between colours in everyday life, traffic lights, matching clothes, no do they have any problems with science practical work at secondary school.
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Tiger Rag
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I'm colourblind (I didn't start losing it until I was about 15 / 16) and I find your question strange. It didn't prevent me from completing my GCSE Science.

Not all science careers involve having good colour vision. It did prevent me doing the career I wanted to do, however.
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Arran90
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(Original post by Tiger Rag)
Not all science careers involve having good colour vision. It did prevent me doing the career I wanted to do, however.
Many do including:

Engineering in the armed forces - extremely strict on this.
Railway engineering.
Forensic science.
Many chemistry careers in industry.
Some biological sciences.
Quality assurance of manufactured products.
Some civilian electronic engineering - usually dictated by the management.
Some materials sciences and metallurgy.

Those which generally don't:

Mathematics and statistics.
Accountancy, finance, and acturial science.
Medicine - strangely enough.
Computing and IT.
Most software engineering - graphics for games could be an exception.
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