Revision tips for Maths and Science

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username2835262
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#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
I find that threads sharing studying tips are all the same with obvious drivel such as "Do past papers!", "Don't forget to make those flashcards!" and it's hard to find actual good advice.

I have a few tips to share that I have personally found effective:

General revision strategy
  • Cover all of the content.
  • Do a past paper
  • Highlight topics of concern
  • Revise topics of concern, do summary questions or test yourself in some way
  • Do a past paper
  • Repeat

This one may be quite obvious, but it's a fail proof method that doesn't require you to make any fancy spider diagrams or anything time consuming. It also means that you only revise the content that you don't know too well, not content you know like the back of your hand.

The Forgetting Curve

Name:  forgetting-curve_en.gif
Views: 623
Size:  13.8 KB

It's pretty self explanatory. You can devise a very efficient revision timetable by using the forgetting curve to show how often you need to revise certain topics. As an example, if you revised Core 4 Vectors today, you could set a reminder on your phone for 1, 3, 10 and 30 days time to go over it again.

This works extremely well with flashcards, so if you have flashcards definitely use this!

Understand everything

This one is important and is something I stupidly overlooked at AS. It's all well and good knowing that a metal emits electrons when radiation above the threshold frequency is fired at it, but why does that happen? Ask yourself that question all of the time when reviewing the content to ensure that you actually know what it means and you don't just know it because it was on a mark scheme a few years ago.

Science specimen papers are HARD

Our entire school found the specimen papers terribly difficult, even the teachers struggled to answer many questions. The actual exam I sat in June was much easier, so don't be concerned as I was by how difficult the specimen papers are.

Check everything with the specification

For Chemistry, there was a change to the method of ionisation in ToF spectrometry which I only found out about because I saw the notice on the AQA website. Also, the AQA textbook completely misses out the Arrhenius equation when it's in the specification...

Just make sure that the textbooks haven't missed anything out as I know that for AQA Science I did notice a few things missing.

Learn how to 'derive stuff' (mainly for Physics and Maths)

A great example is the graphs of cos-1x, sin-1x etc. There is no point in just remembering how they look, they are all the regular graphs reflected in the line y=x. Similarly, it's much easier to just derive the Core 3/4 trig identities by dividing sin2x + cos2x = 1 by both sin2x and cos2x.

With Physics, you can do the same for units. Don't just remember the units (except SI ones), it's much better practice to work them out from the equation. If you're not very good at Maths I'd probably just remember them though. Knowing that one equation is derived from another is also a great way to find links between content (e.g. circular motion and SHM).

I hope these tips are somewhat useful. I'll update the post with more as and when I think of them.
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brainzistheword
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#2
Report 5 years ago
#2
(Original post by W. A. Mozart)
I find that threads sharing studying tips are all the same with obvious drivel such as "Do past papers!", "Don't forget to make those flashcards!" and it's hard to find actual good advice.

I have a few tips to share that I have personally found effective:

General revision strategy
  • Cover all of the content.
  • Do a past paper
  • Highlight topics of concern
  • Revise topics of concern, do summary questions or test yourself in some way
  • Do a past paper
  • Repeat

This one may be quite obvious, but it's a fail proof method that doesn't require you to make any fancy spider diagrams or anything time consuming. It also means that you only revise the content that you don't know too well, not content you know like the back of your hand.

The Forgetting Curve

Name:  forgetting-curve_en.gif
Views: 623
Size:  13.8 KB

It's pretty self explanatory. You can devise a very efficient revision timetable by using the forgetting curve to show how often you need to revise certain topics. As an example, if you revised Core 4 Vectors today, you could set a reminder on your phone for 1, 3, 10 and 30 days time to go over it again.

This works extremely well with flashcards, so if you have flashcards definitely use this!

Understand everything

This one is important and is something I stupidly overlooked at AS. It's all well and good knowing that a metal emits electrons when radiation above the threshold frequency is fired at it, but why does that happen? Ask yourself that question all of the time when reviewing the content to ensure that you actually know what it means and you don't just know it because it was on a mark scheme a few years ago.

Science specimen papers are HARD

Our entire school found the specimen papers terribly difficult, even the teachers struggled to answer many questions. The actual exam I sat in June was much easier, so don't be concerned as I was by how difficult the specimen papers are.

Check everything with the specification

For Chemistry, there was a change to the method of ionisation in ToF spectrometry which I only found out about because I saw the notice on the AQA website. Also, the AQA textbook completely misses out the Arrhenius equation when it's in the specification...

Just make sure that the textbooks haven't missed anything out as I know that for AQA Science I did notice a few things missing.

Learn how to 'derive stuff' (mainly for Physics and Maths)

A great example is the graphs of cos-1x, sin-1x etc. There is no point in just remembering how they look, they are all the regular graphs reflected in the line y=x. Similarly, it's much easier to just derive the Core 3/4 trig identities by dividing sin2x + cos2x = 1 by both sin2x and cos2x.

With Physics, you can do the same for units. Don't just remember the units (except SI ones), it's much better practice to work them out from the equation. If you're not very good at Maths I'd probably just remember them though. Knowing that one equation is derived from another is also a great way to find links between content (e.g. circular motion and SHM).

I hope these tips are somewhat useful. I'll update the post with more as and when I think of them.
Thanks for sharing these - they will definitely come in useful for many
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black1blade
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#3
Report 5 years ago
#3
Yeah ****ing loving maths, physics and chemistry this year (a2, as and as) because I don't really need to "revise" that much just go through past papers and questions, see if I can do things then look up topics I don't get. I mean I don't even have to ever look anything up for maths I just keep doing the past papers and I'm pretty consistently getting 96-99% in core 3 and 4 papers now (teacher has us doing about 4 papers a week). I find a lot of revision activities that aren't just doing questions and reading to be a total and absolute waste of time. Yeah working things out for yourself rather than just learning things by rote is really the way to go.
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