Duke vs Cambridge, which one should I choose

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199 dreams
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Hey guys, I have been really glad of being accepted to both Cambridge University, Engineering and Duke University(just off the waitlist). So, I have been having a hard time of choosing between Cambridge (engineering) vs Duke (engi/maths/finance+ CS double major).
Which one appears to you as a better option? I am an international student and both are without any financial assistance.
Thanks a lot!
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Doones
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(Original post by 199 dreams)
Hey guys, I have been really glad of being accepted to both Cambridge University, Engineering and Duke University(just off the waitlist). So, I have been having a hard time of choosing between Cambridge (engineering) vs Duke (engi/maths/finance+ CS double major).
Which one appears to you as a better option? I am an international student and both are without any financial assistance.
Thanks a lot!
Congratulations​.

Which one is *your* preference?

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Wired_1800
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(Original post by 199 dreams)
Hey guys, I have been really glad of being accepted to both Cambridge University, Engineering and Duke University(just off the waitlist). So, I have been having a hard time of choosing between Cambridge (engineering) vs Duke (engi/maths/finance+ CS double major).
Which one appears to you as a better option? I am an international student and both are without any financial assistance.
Thanks a lot!
Congratulations.

Cambridge, in my opinion. The quality of their engineering is among the very best with MIT, Stanford, Imperial College etc.

I dont really know much about the academic rigour of Duke, but from world rankings Cambridge looks to be higher than them. However, if there is a particular attribute that attracts you to Duke such as scholarship options, sports facilities, then you have to think hard about the decision.

If you are on the fence and dont really mind, then go for Cambridge.

By the way, which Cambridge College made you an offer?
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
Congratulations .

Which one is *your* preference?

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haha, more inclined towards cambridge for now
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Doones
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(Original post by 199 dreams)
haha, more inclined towards cambridge for now
Then choose it.

(Correct decision btw... )

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(Original post by Wired_1800)
Congratulations.

Cambridge, in my opinion. The quality of their engineering is among the very best with MIT, Stanford, Imperial College etc.

I dont really know much about the academic rigour of Duke, but from world rankings Cambridge looks to be higher than them. However, if there is a particular attribute that attracts you to Duke such as scholarship options, sports facilities, then you have to think hard about the decision.

If you are on the fence and dont really mind, then go for Cambridge.

By the way, which Cambridge College made you an offer?
Thanks for your input! Yep, I have heard much about the prestige of Cambridge. And the college is selwyn college.
On the other hand, I read on the Cambridge website that engineering students generally take 4 years courses for a master degree. I wondered is it possible to graduate with 3 years for a bachelor degree and do my master somewhere else like in Stanford ( cos in this case, I got the experiences in both countries and enjoy the higher salary at US. Also, I might apply financial aid for master degree and minimize my cost)
Not quite sure about this .
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
Then choose it.

(Correct decision btw... )

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Wow, immediate reply. Thanks.
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(Original post by 199 dreams)
Thanks for your input! Yep, I have heard much about the prestige of Cambridge. And the college is selwyn college.
On the other hand, I read on the Cambridge website that engineering students generally take 4 years courses for a master degree. I wondered is it possible to graduate with 3 years for a bachelor degree and do my master somewhere else like in Stanford ( cos in this case, I got the experiences in both countries and enjoy the higher salary at US. Also, I might apply financial aid for master degree and minimize my cost)
Not quite sure about this .
Yes you can graduate after three, with your BA.

Have you seen the Stanford Knight Hennessy program?
https://knight-hennessy.stanford.edu/

Note, they will also accept applications from MEng grads.

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(Original post by Doonesbury)
Yes you can graduate after three, with your BA.

Have you seen the Stanford Knight Hennessy program?
https://knight-hennessy.stanford.edu/

Note, they will also accept applications from MEng grads.

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Aha, It looked very nice. But, I mean I don't really need 2 master degrees haha. So I think I would graduate with a bachelor degree and apply then.
But I do have a concern. For engineering, there is the issue of accreditation: in Uk, whether you are a chartered engineer or incorporated engineer status makes a big difference in salary. A master degree in Cam satisfies the requirement for chartered engineer.
On the other hand, I don't know if a US master can satisfy this requirement of Chartered Engineer as well.
On the US side, I am not sure whether there is the same kind of mechanism. If i took my undergrad in UK, could this result in the situation that I do not satisfy the requirement for some engineering status in US even though I have a US master?
Sorry for the broken english and organization haha.
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(Original post by 199 dreams)
Thanks for your input! Yep, I have heard much about the prestige of Cambridge. And the college is selwyn college.
On the other hand, I read on the Cambridge website that engineering students generally take 4 years courses for a master degree. I wondered is it possible to graduate with 3 years for a bachelor degree and do my master somewhere else like in Stanford ( cos in this case, I got the experiences in both countries and enjoy the higher salary at US. Also, I might apply financial aid for master degree and minimize my cost)
Not quite sure about this .
Like i wrote before, i think it has to do with rigour. Many top universities tend to value the 4-year degree over the 3-year one because the former is more extensive.

Also, having an MEng degree satisfies many perquisites that have been mentioned e.g. professional institutions and some graduate school requirements.

In my opinion, i think you will have a stronger application to progress to Stanford from a Cambridge degree than Duke.

Finally, dont think of it as having two masters. I know someone who has a MEng from University of Manchester and an MPhil from Cambridge. He said that an undergraduate masters is very different to a postgrad one because the undergrad one is mostly focused on a group design project while the postgrad one focuses on individual research project.

Choose wisely, but no pressure.
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(Original post by 199 dreams)
Aha, It looked very nice. But, I mean I don't really need 2 master degrees haha. So I think I would graduate with a bachelor degree and apply then.
But I do have a concern. For engineering, there is the issue of accreditation: in Uk, whether you are a chartered engineer or incorporated engineer status makes a big difference in salary. A master degree in Cam satisfies the requirement for chartered engineer.
On the other hand, I don't know if a US master can satisfy this requirement of Chartered Engineer as well.
On the US side, I am not sure whether there is the same kind of mechanism. If i took my undergrad in UK, could this result in the situation that I do not satisfy the requirement for some engineering status in US even though I have a US master?
Sorry for the broken english and organization haha.
The Washington Accord means that UK or US accredited engineering degrees are recognised in the other country (and vice-versa).

Yes I'm sure a US masters from somewhere like Stanford will be absolutely fine for UK chartership requirements. Maybe double-check with IET to be sure (although I'd be surprised if there was any problems).
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(Original post by 199 dreams)
Aha, It looked very nice. But, I mean I don't really need 2 master degrees haha. So I think I would graduate with a bachelor degree and apply then.
But I do have a concern. For engineering, there is the issue of accreditation: in Uk, whether you are a chartered engineer or incorporated engineer status makes a big difference in salary. A master degree in Cam satisfies the requirement for chartered engineer.
On the other hand, I don't know if a US master can satisfy this requirement of Chartered Engineer as well.
On the US side, I am not sure whether there is the same kind of mechanism. If i took my undergrad in UK, could this result in the situation that I do not satisfy the requirement for some engineering status in US even though I have a US master?
Sorry for the broken english and organization haha.
I would be surprised if an American degree didn't satisfy the requirements for chartership. Even if the degree is not "officially" accredited by a licensed UK engineering institute (such as the IMechE), they might still treat it as equivalent if it is ABET accredited due to the Washington Accord, and they can also review it too to ensue its equivalence.
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(Original post by Smack)
I would be surprised if an American degree didn't satisfy the requirements for chartership. Even if the degree is not "officially" accredited by a licensed UK engineering institute (such as the IMechE), they might still treat it as equivalent if it is ABET accredited due to the Washington Accord, and they can also review it too to ensue its equivalence.
And Stanford undergrad engineering programs are indeed ABET accredited. I agree there's little doubt a Masters would be any problem (the real challenge for the OP will be getting into Stanford ).
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Of course it depends on your preference but my personal opinion is Cambridge. Though I study Computer Science at Anglia Ruskin University in Cambridge.
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(Original post by Wired_1800)
Like i wrote before, i think it has to do with rigour. Many top universities tend to value the 4-year degree over the 3-year one because the former is more extensive.

Also, having an MEng degree satisfies many perquisites that have been mentioned e.g. professional institutions and some graduate school requirements.

In my opinion, i think you will have a stronger application to progress to Stanford from a Cambridge degree than Duke.

Finally, dont think of it as having two masters. I know someone who has a MEng from University of Manchester and an MPhil from Cambridge. He said that an undergraduate masters is very different to a postgrad one because the undergrad one is mostly focused on a group design project while the postgrad one focuses on individual research project.

Choose wisely, but no pressure.
Okay! I will take it into consideration and seriously consider about an MEng Haha. Thanks ~~
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
The Washington Accord means that UK or US accredited engineering degrees are recognised in the other country (and vice-versa).

Yes I'm sure a US masters from somewhere like Stanford will be absolutely fine for UK chartership requirements. Maybe double-check with IET to be sure (although I'd be surprised if there was any problems).
I didn't know this before. thanks for your knowledge!
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(Original post by Smack)
I would be surprised if an American degree didn't satisfy the requirements for chartership. Even if the degree is not "officially" accredited by a licensed UK engineering institute (such as the IMechE), they might still treat it as equivalent if it is ABET accredited due to the Washington Accord, and they can also review it too to ensue its equivalence.
Okay! I felt reassured by this LOL
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
And Stanford undergrad engineering programs are indeed ABET accredited. I agree there's little doubt a Masters would be any problem (the real challenge for the OP will be getting into Stanford ).
LOL I was rejected by Stanford as an undergrad(Maybe because I applied for financial aid as an international?) But hope that I can get a Stanford Master
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(Original post by IonGeneral)
Of course it depends on your preference but my personal opinion is Cambridge. Though I study Computer Science at Anglia Ruskin University in Cambridge.
Thanks! Computer science is such a good major for future career haha
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Oh yes! I have an essential question to ask!(forgot to put in)
How hard is it to get into large Tech companies like Apple/Linkedin/Microsoft/Google from Cambridge versus Duke?(internship as well as job offer)
Because I heard from my seniors from Duke that Duke's pratt is a target school and most Duke students got into these companies and it is not hard. But my seniors from Cambridge told me it is not easy to get into them due to interviews and selections...
Is it actually the case? because of the UK vs US culture?
So the answer to this problem can be a real game-changer for me.
Thanks guys!
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