How practical is the university of warwick's theatre and performance course?

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Garno45
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Hello everyone,

I really need to ask someone about Warwick's Theatre and Performance studies course. I've tried asking lecturers, but I find that they either can confuse me more, or that I cannot get through to them as they are busy working. Therefore, I thought that it would be good to ask these questions to a student, especially a student who is currently on the course.

I've recently firmed my offer to study French and theatre studies (joint honours) come September at the university of Warwick. However, I am concerned that the department's definition of 'practical' and my definition of 'practical' are not the same.

I would like to know, are there opportunities to perform on this course? I am well aware that it is not an acting degree, that students do not get taught acting, and that acting is not assessed during performance exams. I have done drama studies workshops and have experienced conservatoire style acting lessons in the past, so I know the difference between theatre and performance studies lessons and acting lessons. What I would like to know is:

Can students create something that tells a story with characters for certain practical assessments (if the group’s ideas lead to this)? Can they use their bodies, speech and expression to do this? I know that this is not an acting course and that no one gets taught how to act, but I find that being able to perform a character in a devised performance/performance of an adapted text can be a good way to get a point across. I am also a very kinaesthetic learner, so this is good for me.

Are there opportunities to perform while learning on this course, even though you are not assessed on acting, but on how you answer a research question?

What are practical assessments generally like and how long are they? Can they involve putting on a whole play or devised performance, or do they involve showing short demonstrations of ideas?

Another question that is pressing on my mind concerns how theory modules are taught (modules not assessed by a performance exam). I know that this depends on the lecturer, but are there regular workshop exercises involving voice and movement on theory modules? Or are they mostly taught through seminars and lectures? Do lessons on theory modules move freely between exposition, workshop exercises, and discussions?

Also, some of the current modules, such as the second year module 'dramaturgy' seem practical, but are not assessed by a performance exam. Instead, they are assessed by a 'practice-based portfolio' and a 'project-based assessment'. What are these assessments? Are they practical in nature? Does the portfolio involve you and your group filming your ideas? Can your 'project' include devising a performance?

I would appreciate a response as soon as possible, as these questions are pressing on my mind quite heavily (also, if I want to call UCAS and change my mind about my firm choice, tomorrow is my last day to do so). I am concerned that I did not completely understand what I had read about the course before applying.

Thank you so much for your time.

PS. If there are people at Warwick on this course, or who have been on this course, who specialise, or who have specialised in practical work, would they mind telling me what they did and what they were inspired by? Would they also mind telling me what module they did it on? Particular modules I am interested in that are offered at Warwick are the Live Art modules taught by Nicolas Whybrow and Susan Haedicke's modules on Adaptation for performance and Dramaturgy. I am also interested to learn what people do for practical work on independent study modules.
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Sebbers3
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(Original post by Garno45)
Hello everyone,

I really need to ask someone about Warwick's Theatre and Performance studies course. I've tried asking lecturers, but I find that they either can confuse me more, or that I cannot get through to them as they are busy working. Therefore, I thought that it would be good to ask these questions to a student, especially a student who is currently on the course.

I've recently firmed my offer to study French and theatre studies (joint honours) come September at the university of Warwick. However, I am concerned that the department's definition of 'practical' and my definition of 'practical' are not the same.

I would like to know, are there opportunities to perform on this course? I am well aware that it is not an acting degree, that students do not get taught acting, and that acting is not assessed during performance exams. I have done drama studies workshops and have experienced conservatoire style acting lessons in the past, so I know the difference between theatre and performance studies lessons and acting lessons. What I would like to know is:

Can students create something that tells a story with characters for certain practical assessments (if the group’s ideas lead to this)? Can they use their bodies, speech and expression to do this? I know that this is not an acting course and that no one gets taught how to act, but I find that being able to perform a character in a devised performance/performance of an adapted text can be a good way to get a point across. I am also a very kinaesthetic learner, so this is good for me.

Are there opportunities to perform while learning on this course, even though you are not assessed on acting, but on how you answer a research question?

What are practical assessments generally like and how long are they? Can they involve putting on a whole play or devised performance, or do they involve showing short demonstrations of ideas?

Another question that is pressing on my mind concerns how theory modules are taught (modules not assessed by a performance exam). I know that this depends on the lecturer, but are there regular workshop exercises involving voice and movement on theory modules? Or are they mostly taught through seminars and lectures? Do lessons on theory modules move freely between exposition, workshop exercises, and discussions?

Also, some of the current modules, such as the second year module 'dramaturgy' seem practical, but are not assessed by a performance exam. Instead, they are assessed by a 'practice-based portfolio' and a 'project-based assessment'. What are these assessments? Are they practical in nature? Does the portfolio involve you and your group filming your ideas? Can your 'project' include devising a performance?

I would appreciate a response as soon as possible, as these questions are pressing on my mind quite heavily (also, if I want to call UCAS and change my mind about my firm choice, tomorrow is my last day to do so). I am concerned that I did not completely understand what I had read about the course before applying.

Thank you so much for your time.

PS. If there are people at Warwick on this course, or who have been on this course, who specialise, or who have specialised in practical work, would they mind telling me what they did and what they were inspired by? Would they also mind telling me what module they did it on? Particular modules I am interested in that are offered at Warwick are the Live Art modules taught by Nicolas Whybrow and Susan Haedicke's modules on Adaptation for performance and Dramaturgy. I am also interested to learn what people do for practical work on independent study modules.
Where did you go in the end? What has been your experience of drama in your current university?
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