hminel
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Hi, I'm 28yrs old and of filipino origin. I came over here in UK when I was 17. I started working straight away. At the moment I am working in a private hospital as a pathology coordinator. I started nursing back in the Philippines but only did 1 year of it.

I am not sure on what route to take. I really want to get a degree in biomedical sciences or nursing as my fall back.

Hope you guys can give me some advises.
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mel_l218
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(Original post by hminel)
Hi, I'm 28yrs old and of filipino origin. I came over here in UK when I was 17. I started working straight away. At the moment I am working in a private hospital as a pathology coordinator. I started nursing back in the Philippines but only did 1 year of it.

I am not sure on what route to take. I really want to get a degree in biomedical sciences or nursing as my fall back.

Hope you guys can give me some advises.
Hi, the two courses are very different. I would recommend going to university open days so you can find out more about the courses and it may help you make your decision. They can also advise you on if you meet the entry requirements to apply. Some work experience or voluntary experience on a nursing ward or care setting may help you too.
Nursing is very competitive, so if you do apply as a "fall back" they may sense this from your personal statement and/or you at the selection day. So I would say, be sure about applying for nursing if you choose to do so.
I hope this helps.
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LauraBMS
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They are two entirely different jobs. To oversimplify it: if you want to work with patients choose nursing, if you want no patient contact choose biomedical science. I've been a BMS for the past 7 years and if I could go back I would have chosen nursing instead. I miss working with patients and I feel that nursing opens doors to so many different areas and roles within the NHS, where as as a BMS you are very limited in terms of what you can do. Also, as a BMS you get very little recognition,(due to the nature of the job being hidden away from patients and other healthcare professionals in labs) it is a very undervalued role. This means that the pay is poor and there is little to no funding for training and progression.
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hminel
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(Original post by mel_l218)
Hi, the two courses are very different. I would recommend going to university open days so you can find out more about the courses and it may help you make your decision. They can also advise you on if you meet the entry requirements to apply. Some work experience or voluntary experience on a nursing ward or care setting may help you too.
Nursing is very competitive, so if you do apply as a "fall back" they may sense this from your personal statement and/or you at the selection day. So I would say, be sure about applying for nursing if you choose to do so.
I hope this helps.
(Original post by LauraBMS)
They are two entirely different jobs. To oversimplify it: if you want to work with patients choose nursing, if you want no patient contact choose biomedical science. I've been a BMS for the past 7 years and if I could go back I would have chosen nursing instead. I miss working with patients and I feel that nursing opens doors to so many different areas and roles within the NHS, where as as a BMS you are very limited in terms of what you can do. Also, as a BMS you get very little recognition,(due to the nature of the job being hidden away from patients and other healthcare professionals in labs) it is a very undervalued role. This means that the pay is poor and there is little to no funding for training and progression.
Hi guys. I understand what you are saying as I've been torn between these two ever since before I started nursing. My family all comes from a medical background (nurses, midwives, bms's, doctors and dentists).

To be honest I quite like the very technical side hence why the bms as first choice. My nursing as my second choice because I already had some training on it.

What I want to know is the access courses. As I said, I already did 1 year of nursing, I'm not really sure how will that translate here. Will it be credited if I go to nursing here? Or will some of the subjects be credited for BMS? I'm just so confused at the moment. LOL
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LauraBMS
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(Original post by hminel)
Hi guys. I understand what you are saying as I've been torn between these two ever since before I started nursing. My family all comes from a medical background (nurses, midwives, bms's, doctors and dentists).

To be honest I quite like the very technical side hence why the bms as first choice. My nursing as my second choice because I already had some training on it.

What I want to know is the access courses. As I said, I already did 1 year of nursing, I'm not really sure how will that translate here. Will it be credited if I go to nursing here? Or will some of the subjects be credited for BMS? I'm just so confused at the moment. LOL
If you would like to train as a scientist, but still work with patients there are some healthcare scientist roles which might be of interest to you such as cardiac physiologists. I think that you will need to contact a university to see if your first year of nursing would count towards any credits on either of the courses.
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mel_l218
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(Original post by hminel)
Hi guys. I understand what you are saying as I've been torn between these two ever since before I started nursing. My family all comes from a medical background (nurses, midwives, bms's, doctors and dentists).

To be honest I quite like the very technical side hence why the bms as first choice. My nursing as my second choice because I already had some training on it.

What I want to know is the access courses. As I said, I already did 1 year of nursing, I'm not really sure how will that translate here. Will it be credited if I go to nursing here? Or will some of the subjects be credited for BMS? I'm just so confused at the moment. LOL
It would be best to speak to the universities you want to apply to find out if you have any credits or something from your year of nursing in the Philipines.
An access course is the equivalent of A-levels and would be a year full time or two years part time course at college to meet requirements to go on to university. This would be an option if you do not meet the academic entry requirements for the course you want to apply for, whichever it may be.
I hope this helps.
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