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Do you think there is a correlation between the type of college attended and ... watch

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    performance in the A-level exams?
    Do you consider the A grades achieved by someone in an ordinary poorly performing college to be equal in value to A grades achieved by a student attending a top grade grammar school?

    good question, i couldn't cope at a grammar school the first week i went there............. however i think it is all down to the individual
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    Yes, imo a level success is heavily influenced by the quality of teaching and the general learning environment. My first year of sixth form was spent at a comprehensive, where i got ABCC. However, after spending the upper sixth at a private sixth form college, i achieved AAAB.
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    It doesnt, which is why its one of the factors considered by Unversities during the admissions process.
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    (Original post by DazYa777)
    good question, i couldn't cope at a grammar school the first week i went there............. however i think it is all down to the individual
    I think the same..I attended private school for 10 yrs and when i had the choice, i selected a really normal college with people from all walks of life and felt i'm actually living on earth now and not on the clouds...
    BTW, i achieved 5A's and a C at a college where people fail to even achieve a quarter of that!
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    I don't think it's so much A-levels as previous schooling, really. With A-levels there is a lot of focus on self-learning so if you're really determined, you can do well in the most dire of circumstances. Whereas, when you come from a slightly less fabulous GCSE background for example, going to a school where you're surrounded by kids who don't care about their futures a whole lot, I think the grades do mean a lot more, because they show just how determined you are.
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    Some grammar school teachers are frankly **** compared to other state schools. Mediocre and crap teachers manage to get by due to 'teaching' a group of highly motivated and able individuals, set against a backdrop of intense discipline and pressure.

    In many scenarios - a monkey could take a GCSE class at a top grammar and achieve virtually all A*s and As, with no pupil below a C.

    I reject the assertion that grammar schools have better teachers than most other schools. A lot of their achievement in public exams (especially GCSE) is due to the nature of the intake (the top decile at age 11) and not necessarily the teaching staff.
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    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)
    Some grammar school teachers are frankly **** compared to other state schools. Mediocre and crap teachers manage to get by due to 'teaching' a group of highly motivated and able individuals, set against a backdrop of intense discipline and pressure.

    In many scenarios - a monkey could take a GCSE class at a top grammar and achieve virtually all A*s and As, with no pupil below a C.

    I reject the assertion that grammar schools have better teachers than most other schools. A lot of their achievement in public exams (especially GCSE) is due to the nature of the intake (the top decile at age 11) and not necessarily the teaching staff.

    exactly, they take the brightest so end up with the brightest, they'd of failed as a school if they didn't get above average grades overall.

    Its like oxford and cambridge take extremly clever people so they get clever people out. Its not that their teaching is any better or worst, although thats a whole other issue.
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    What are you using to measure the type of college? Unless it's on a numerical scale, you can't really correlate them.
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    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)
    Some grammar school teachers are frankly **** compared to other state schools. Mediocre and crap teachers manage to get by due to 'teaching' a group of highly motivated and able individuals, set against a backdrop of intense discipline and pressure.

    In many scenarios - a monkey could take a GCSE class at a top grammar and achieve virtually all A*s and As, with no pupil below a C.

    I reject the assertion that grammar schools have better teachers than most other schools. A lot of their achievement in public exams (especially GCSE) is due to the nature of the intake (the top decile at age 11) and not necessarily the teaching staff.
    Very true indeed. What annoys me even more is when people assume that a grammar school is the same as a private school
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    The fact is, teaching resources at private schools are much, much better than those at a comprehensive. Of course individual input is important, but both factors are interdependent - theres no point in being an excellent indvidual worker if the teaching doesnt allow you to exploit that potential, and vice-versa.

    Two examples of my comprehensive sixth form.

    -Firstly, we didnt have a teacher for most of our Unit 5 law syllabus because our teacher left, and the college couldnt afford/couldnt find another teacher to teach us. Predictably, most students did worse on this paper than the other law papers. Many dropped a grade because of it.
    -Secondly, the art department at our college failed its Ofsted inspection and is in the threat of being closed unless it drastically improves. The results of the students doing Art were very, very poor.

    It takes much more dedication and work on behalf of the student to achieve good grades in a poor learning environment than it does for a student of a private school.
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    (Original post by kingslaw)
    The fact is, teaching resources at private schools are much, much better than those at a comprehensive. Of course individual input is important, but both factors are interdependent - theres no point in being an excellent indvidual worker if the teaching doesnt allow you to exploit that potential, and vice-versa.

    Two examples of my comprehensive sixth form.

    -Firstly, we didnt have a teacher for most of our Unit 5 law syllabus because our teacher left, and the college couldnt afford/couldnt find another teacher to teach us. Predictably, most students did worse on this paper than the other law papers. Many dropped a grade because of it.
    -Secondly, the art department at our college failed its Ofsted inspection and is in the threat of being closed unless it drastically improves. The results of the students doing Art were very, very poor.

    It takes much more dedication and work on behalf of the student to achieve good grades in a poor learning environment than it does for a student of a private school.
    I don't think grammar schools are the same as private schools though I have to agree with what you said about private schools anyway.
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    (Original post by kingslaw)
    The fact is, teaching resources at private schools are much, much better than those at a comprehensive. Of course individual input is important, but both factors are interdependent - theres no point in being an excellent indvidual worker if the teaching doesnt allow you to exploit that potential, and vice-versa.

    Two examples of my comprehensive sixth form.

    -Firstly, we didnt have a teacher for most of our Unit 5 law syllabus because our teacher left, and the college couldnt afford/couldnt find another teacher to teach us. Predictably, most students did worse on this paper than the other law papers. Many dropped a grade because of it.
    -Secondly, the art department at our college failed its Ofsted inspection and is in the threat of being closed unless it drastically improves. The results of the students doing Art were very, very poor.

    It takes much more dedication and work on behalf of the student to achieve good grades in a poor learning environment than it does for a student of a private school.
    In my college we didn't have a maths teacher for months
    had 4 hours a week for a subject at A2 rather than 6
    had a chem teacher that used to sit and do nothing for the 6 lessons
 
 
 
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