_Bright Eyes
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Are there any hybrid/2in1 laptops around that can offer high end gaming as well as touchscreen/stylus support for note taking in class?

If not, what would be a good alternative? Cheap tablet and a gaming laptop?
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Gofre
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(Original post by _Bright Eyes)
Are there any hybrid/2in1 laptops around that can offer high end gaming as well as touchscreen/stylus support for note taking in class?

If not, what would be a good alternative? Cheap tablet and a gaming laptop?
Not really, no. High end internals plus intensive workloads like gaming equals loads of heat, which a tablet form factor isn't going to handle well at all. The closest thing available on the mass market (that I'm aware of) is the Surface Book with Performance Base, which gets you a dual core i7 and GTX 965M in the base (to my knowledge Microsoft are the only ones utilising a GPU in the keyboard section, or at least the only ones doing it in a way that's well implemented) for a totally reasonable £2249.

So yeah, your best alternatives are going to be a cheap tablet paired with either a gaming laptop or desktop. Does it absolutely need to be a laptop, if you've got a tablet for mobile use? Or do you want to be able to move around with your gaming machine too? What's your budget?
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_Bright Eyes
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(Original post by Gofre)
Not really, no. High end internals plus intensive workloads like gaming equals loads of heat, which a tablet form factor isn't going to handle well at all. The closest thing available on the mass market (that I'm aware of) is the Surface Book with Performance Base, which gets you a dual core i7 and GTX 965M in the base (to my knowledge Microsoft are the only ones utilising a GPU in the keyboard section, or at least the only ones doing it in a way that's well implemented) for a totally reasonable £2249.

So yeah, your best alternatives are going to be a cheap tablet paired with either a gaming laptop or desktop. Does it absolutely need to be a laptop, if you've got a tablet for mobile use? Or do you want to be able to move around with your gaming machine too? What's your budget?
Thanks for your reply. Thinking now I'll keep hold of my Surface pro 2, at least until new comes out about the pro 5, and perhaps invest in a gaming laptop or PC. On this slight tangent, are there much better out there in the same price range as https://www.overclockers.co.uk/gigab...lt-07x-gi.html or under £2000?

In terms of PCs, I really know little about the costing these days. How much could you save, or more could you get for your money on a PC set up for gaming? I know these are very broad questions, but any advice?
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Gofre
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(Original post by _Bright Eyes)
Thanks for your reply. Thinking now I'll keep hold of my Surface pro 2, at least until new comes out about the pro 5, and perhaps invest in a gaming laptop or PC. On this slight tangent, are there much better out there in the same price range as https://www.overclockers.co.uk/gigab...lt-07x-gi.html or under £2000?
In that laptop you're paying a big premium for the slim 14" form factor. If you take that away you can get a normal sized 15" laptop (it doesn't need to be a 17" beast the size and weight of a patio tile) for cheaper or move up a GPU tier. I've just checked PCSpecialist as their customisable laptops are typically good indicators of what you can find on the wider market, and you canget this 15" model spec'd out with the same 7700HQ processor, 16GB of RAM and 500GB SSD, a higher resolution display and a GTX 1070 for £1703. If you do want something with a slim footprint, however, that looks about standard for this sort of premium machine.

In terms of PCs, I really know little about the costing these days. How much could you save, or more could you get for your money on a PC set up for gaming? I know these are very broad questions, but any advice?
The broad answer to your broad question is you can save a lot by opting for a desktop of similar performance, especially if you put it together yourself. This has always been the case, because as well as paying for the raw hardware you're paying for the work that goes into cramming that hardware into a comparatively tiny body without it becoming a fire hazard. I'm actually planning my own PC build that will sit at a similar performance level as this laptop (Nvidia's laptop GPUs are essentially identical to their desktop counterparts now, so all other things being equal the GPUs will perform very similarly), and including a cheap 1440p display I'm looking at total of about a grand. And this isn't a massive tower either, I'm going to be using a case about the size of a large shoebox;

Image

But yeah, the savings are definitely there. And that's without taking into account the lifetime savings from incremental upgrades as opposed to replacing your premium laptop with another premium laptop when graphic performance isn't meeting your standards in newer games anymore. For a lot of people the portability is worth the 30-60% price hike, but I honestly think desktop gaming is the way to go if gaming on the go isn't an absolute priority for your life right now.
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_Bright Eyes
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(Original post by Gofre)
In that laptop you're paying a big premium for the slim 14" form factor. If you take that away you can get a normal sized 15" laptop (it doesn't need to be a 17" beast the size and weight of a patio tile) for cheaper or move up a GPU tier. I've just checked PCSpecialist as their customisable laptops are typically good indicators of what you can find on the wider market, and you canget this 15" model spec'd out with the same 7700HQ processor, 16GB of RAM and 500GB SSD, a higher resolution display and a GTX 1070 for £1703. If you do want something with a slim footprint, however, that looks about standard for this sort of premium machine.



The broad answer to your broad question is you can save a lot by opting for a desktop of similar performance, especially if you put it together yourself. This has always been the case, because as well as paying for the raw hardware you're paying for the work that goes into cramming that hardware into a comparatively tiny body without it becoming a fire hazard. I'm actually planning my own PC build that will sit at a similar performance level as this laptop (Nvidia's laptop GPUs are essentially identical to their desktop counterparts now, so all other things being equal the GPUs will perform very similarly), and including a cheap 1440p display I'm looking at total of about a grand. And this isn't a massive tower either, I'm going to be using a case about the size of a large shoebox;

Image

But yeah, the savings are definitely there. And that's without taking into account the lifetime savings from incremental upgrades as opposed to replacing your premium laptop with another premium laptop when graphic performance isn't meeting your standards in newer games anymore. For a lot of people the portability is worth the 30-60% price hike, but I honestly think desktop gaming is the way to go if gaming on the go isn't an absolute priority for your life right now.
Thanks again for the detailed reply, this has helped me formulate some ideas on what I'd like to do.

Was already toying with the option of building my own machine and I'm really warming to the idea. Do you have any advice or a resource for beginners? Particularly interesting in something that small - I wouldn't mind lugging it to a friends who has a spare monitor when I want to game, as we usually spend enough hours(/days) gaming to make it worth it. I'm reasonably technologically proficient and have good finesse with these things but don't know anything about building my own machine. Is there a good chance I could buy components that wouldn't fit, or make something that would burn the flat down? My flatmates wouldn't be too happy.. Thanks!
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Gofre
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(Original post by _Bright Eyes)
Thanks again for the detailed reply, this has helped me formulate some ideas on what I'd like to do.

Was already toying with the option of building my own machine and I'm really warming to the idea. Do you have any advice or a resource for beginners?
There are two main steps to building a PC- picking the parts, and putting them all together. The second bit is easy- I built my first PC over the course of an afternoon after spending a few hours watching tutorials on YouTube. Picking parts requires doing a decent bit of research to make sure you're getting the best components for your money if you aren't already up to speed with the industry, but you can always request part lists in the main Tech forum on TSR, subreddits like r/buildapc, or I could put something together for you if you wanted.

Particularly interesting in something that small - I wouldn't mind lugging it to a friends who has a spare monitor when I want to game, as we usually spend enough hours(/days) gaming to make it worth it.
Small builds are awesome but can be fiddly, given the space constraints compared to a full sized tower. Just something to be aware of if it's your first build.

I'm reasonably technologically proficient and have good finesse with these things but don't know anything about building my own machine. Is there a good chance I could buy components that wouldn't fit, or make something that would burn the flat down? My flatmates wouldn't be too happy.. Thanks!
The vast majority of PC components on the market are modular and built to meet widely adopted standards, it's very easy to tell if your parts are going to fit together as long as you pay attention to the information on their product pages. For example if you choose an Intel CPU you need to make sure the motherboard has the matching socket to put that CPU in. You can use sites like PCPartPicker to ensure everything you've chosen is compatible. When it comes to small form factor builds you have to keep an eye on things like the length of the graphics card not exceeding the length of the case and the height of the CPU cooler, but most standard parts will be completely fine.
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152mmOfDerp
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Yes, PCPartPicker is a brilliant resource for build although I wouldn't recommend their forums for picking parts as a lot of the people there are self adopted, 11 year old tech "experts".

For example, I've used PCPartPicker for ensuring the compatibility of parts and finding the best prices. In fact, I'm building my mum's computer and I just ordered the parts. The lists generally look like this

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1400 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor (£155.99 @ Amazon UK)
Motherboard: Asus - PRIME B350-PLUS ATX AM4 Motherboard (£77.91 @ Amazon UK)
Memory: Corsair - 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR4-2133 Memory (£57.99 @ Amazon UK)
Video Card: Gigabyte - GeForce GT 730 2GB Video Card (£51.99 @ Amazon UK)
Case: Fractal Design - Core 2300 ATX Mid Tower Case (£43.53 @ Amazon UK)
Power Supply: Corsair - CXM 450W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply (£48.36 @ Ebuyer)
Optical Drive: LG - GH24NSC0B DVD/CD Writer (£18.99 @ Amazon UK)
Wireless Network Adapter: Gigabyte - GC-WB867D-I PCI-Express x1 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi Adapter (£26.95 @ Amazon UK)
Other: Toshiba P300 1TB 3.5'' SATA High-Performance Hard Drive (OEM) (£39.99 @ Ebuyer)
Other: Windows 10 (£98.49)
Other: SM961 (£67.99)

Total: £688.18 Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-05-13 12:41 BST+0100

If you're new to computer building then a lot of it won't make sense. One thing I would recommend doing is researching what each part is useful for (e.e.g CPU, GPU, SSD, HDD, PSU etc...)

Here's a video of building a certain PC. This should give you an idea of what it is like:



Have a look at the video, do some research and come back with an idea of what you want
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_Bright Eyes
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(Original post by Gofre)
There are two main steps to building a PC- picking the parts, and putting them all together. The second bit is easy- I built my first PC over the course of an afternoon after spending a few hours watching tutorials on YouTube. Picking parts requires doing a decent bit of research to make sure you're getting the best components for your money if you aren't already up to speed with the industry, but you can always request part lists in the main Tech forum on TSR, subreddits like r/buildapc, or I could put something together for you if you wanted.



Small builds are awesome but can be fiddly, given the space constraints compared to a full sized tower. Just something to be aware of if it's your first build.



The vast majority of PC components on the market are modular and built to meet widely adopted standards, it's very easy to tell if your parts are going to fit together as long as you pay attention to the information on their product pages. For example if you choose an Intel CPU you need to make sure the motherboard has the matching socket to put that CPU in. You can use sites like PCPartPicker to ensure everything you've chosen is compatible. When it comes to small form factor builds you have to keep an eye on things like the length of the graphics card not exceeding the length of the case and the height of the CPU cooler, but most standard parts will be completely fine.
Thanks both.

Here's my first draft of a build. Got a lot of help from a friend. Wanted to run it by yall.

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/28GyBP

The case, CPU cooler, power supply and fan my friend already has so I built around that. Whatcha think? I'm open to change.
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152mmOfDerp
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So are you in the US or the UK?
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Gofre
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(Original post by _Bright Eyes)
Thanks both.

Here's my first draft of a build. Got a lot of help from a friend. Wanted to run it by yall.

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/28GyBP

The case, CPU cooler, power supply and fan my friend already has so I built around that. Whatcha think? I'm open to change.
I would save cash and move from a 7700K to a 7700 and change the motherboard accordingly. Temps are already going to be high inside a densely packed ITX case, if you want to overclock go for a larger system. Other than that it looks solid.
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_Bright Eyes
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(Original post by 152mmOfDerp)
So are you in the US or the UK?
UK, unsure why it flipped to $
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_Bright Eyes
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(Original post by Gofre)
I would save cash and move from a 7700K to a 7700 and change the motherboard accordingly. Temps are already going to be high inside a densely packed ITX case, if you want to overclock go for a larger system. Other than that it looks solid.
Oh okay, am not sure the difference. Cheers.
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_Bright Eyes
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(Original post by Gofre)
I would save cash and move from a 7700K to a 7700 and change the motherboard accordingly. Temps are already going to be high inside a densely packed ITX case, if you want to overclock go for a larger system. Other than that it looks solid.
I already noticed a potential problem: "Some Intel Z170 chipset motherboards may need a BIOS update prior to using Kaby Lake-S CPUs. Upgrading the BIOS may require a different CPU that is supported by older BIOS revisions."

Hmhm, perhaps I should go for something else.
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Gofre
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(Original post by _Bright Eyes)
Oh okay, am not sure the difference. Cheers.
The 7700 is a quad core processor with a predetermined base clock speed of 3.6GHz. The 7700K is the same processor physically, but the core clock is unlocked so users can manually increase the clock speed their processor is running at. The upside is that it lets you increase the performance of your processor, the downside is that it kicks up the heat output. As a general rule, in small ITX builds the more manageable temperatures of a stable processor clock are more important than the performance gains of overclocking.
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