beccaea15
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Hi, I'm in dire need of some advice. My exams start next Wednesday but in the last week, I've developed RSI (Repetitive Strain Injury) in my writing hand and have been banned from writing by my mum until my exams so it can have time to heal and rest. In the meantime- what do I do revision wise? I've contacted my teachers to ask if I can meet them during a break to basically speak at them about what I've revised, I'm reading my text books (the worst thing to do I know...) and amusing my laptop with my on-writing left hand which can be really slow and tedious. Any tips?
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claireestelle
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(Original post by beccaea15)
Hi, I'm in dire need of some advice. My exams start next Wednesday but in the last week, I've developed RSI (Repetitive Strain Injury) in my writing hand and have been banned from writing by my mum until my exams so it can have time to heal and rest. In the meantime- what do I do revision wise? I've contacted my teachers to ask if I can meet them during a break to basically speak at them about what I've revised, I'm reading my text books (the worst thing to do I know...) and amusing my laptop with my on-writing left hand which can be really slow and tedious. Any tips?
the free software isnt flawless but speech to text software and online flashcards could help you?
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999tigger
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Use the notes you have. Put in a special consideration claim for your injured hand as well. You will need GP letter for that.

Other methods to use.

Study buddy where you quiz each other. Dont think your teachers will have time. That includes a skype study group. It is good for variety.
Depending on subject then youtube videos and documentaries.
there are probably some good physio advice sites for RSI as well. Try not to get paranoid.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6N7l...nnel=Tien%20Le
Lots of exercise videos as well.

On the day I would take some painkillers 20 min before the exam. Try and write steadily and within your limitations. Keep flexing your fist ever five minutes or so.
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username1842595
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watch youtube videos
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dina.yasmin
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I would suggest:
1) Go through topics that you aren't confident of, read them on textbook/revision guides and understand them.
2)Then type brief notes on your desktop. Memorise them and repeat. If you don't want to type notes then look at students' notes, it is available everywhere on the internet e.g. GetRevising, Quizlet
3) Get your parent or friend to test you. You can also test your friend too.

Repeating things can make a difference!

4) Once when you are confident, go for past papers on the website. Also look at examiners report and mark schemes to find out what kind of answer they are looking for.
5) Past papers are KEY, keep going over them. You will notice some similar questions that come up every year

I hope this helps! Good luck
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TheMightyBadger
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(Original post by beccaea15)
Hi, I'm in dire need of some advice. My exams start next Wednesday but in the last week, I've developed RSI (Repetitive Strain Injury) in my writing hand and have been banned from writing by my mum until my exams so it can have time to heal and rest. In the meantime- what do I do revision wise? I've contacted my teachers to ask if I can meet them during a break to basically speak at them about what I've revised, I'm reading my text books (the worst thing to do I know...) and amusing my laptop with my on-writing left hand which can be really slow and tedious. Any tips?
Maybe get your mum to ask you questions from the text book.
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President Snow
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I cannot stress this enough - testing aides learning. As you seem to know, reading and re-reading and reading again does not help retention. Writing and re-writing and writing again is better than repeated reading but still not great. The way to really learn is testing. Forced recall. Even unsuccessful recall has a greater effect on learning than does repeated reading. Leverage this.

Read an equation you need to know. Cover it up and try to remember it in full. Really, really struggle and battle to recall every part of it. This struggle is what is helping you learn. When you can't remember any more, take a sneaky look and keep trying to remember. Then cover it up and try to remember it again.

Next, test yourself in expanding intervals. Try very hard to recall, and then check, important equations once you've finished that section in your notes, later that evening, tomorrow, later this week, next week, next month, just before the exam.

Finally, make sure to do past papers. Even if you can't write, think carefully about what you would write, or the equations you'd need to use, the steps you would take, the checks you would make.

Hope this helps.
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