Where to go Watch

Kindred
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This is something that comes up a fair bit so I figured i'd do a quick infomercial on where you can go for various medical things. The NHS has a guide for this (http://www.nhs.uk/NHSEngland/AboutNH...SServices.aspx), but sometimes it's hard to work out what's an emergency or what's not serious so i'll add some examples I hear about often.
This is also a chance to ask about different scenarios or anything. Just bare in mind that I am not trained in this stuff bar basic first aid so do not know everything. It's always best to follow up with your own research for anything important.

Anyway, here's a list of different services on the NHS and when to use them:

Pharmacy
- general queries for things like colds, heavy sweating, mild acne and other minor ailments. Also for advice on medications ("can I take X with Y?", "what's best for this type of pain?" etc). They can tell you if you need to see a doctor instead of them.

GP (normal appointment)
- routine things that aren't urgent or time sensitive. Things like feeling generally unwell, snoring loudly at night, being tired often, feeling depressed, persistent aches and pains.

GP (urgent appointment)/ walk-in-relatively minor things that are time sensitive or urgent. Things like cuts, odd rashes, infections, sprains, severe pains (prevent yo from doing usual things/ aren't helped by painkillers), passing blood in stool/ urine or coughing up blood. This can also include things like suspicious lumps as they can be urgent.

A&E- Emergencies (immediate or very serious danger). Things like sever chest pain, serious breaks, concussion, passing out, difficulty breathing, heavy bleeding.
Also things that are too urgent for GP/ walk-in or need hospital equipment*. Severe pains at night, minor breaks/ fractures etc.
The accident part is silly- stubbing your toe is an accident, but you should not go to A&E for that.

*some places will have an urgent treatment centre which can be used for things like this- call 111 or look it up if you are unsure.

999- Super emergencies (a life is at risk). Things like strokes, heart attacks, allergic reactions, seizures, unconsciousness, suicide risks, neck injuries.
Also for when you cannot get to A&E yourself with things like heavy bleeding, chest pains, serious breaks. Remember, it is unsafe to drive yourself if you are unwell.

111- For if you are unsure. You can call them if you aren't sure where to go and they will ask some questions then tell you the most appropriate place. They can also book appointments with out of hours dentists and hospitals.
This can be useful for the blurred line between urgent and emergency or if you are unsure what a symptom indicates.
They take information so they can call an ambulance, call back if disconnected or add things to your records. You can ask to stay anon.
Things like feeling dizzy, unusual marks or discharges, dental pain out of hours, medicine side effects, litterally anything else. Also, if you have issues with transport etc- they can put you on with drs/ nurses or advise you.



Here are some examples of situations and where to go:

You are playing football in a field with friends. One friend takes a nasty fall and injures their leg. It looks broken.
Can they move to a car and be driven to A&E? If yes, do that.
Does it hurt too much to move them or look like their leg will be further injured if you try? If yes, call an ambulance.
(They need an xray. It is not an emergency, but is urgent. They need to be seen at a hospital soon. If you cannot move them you need to call somebody who can.)

You are walking home when you see somebody on a motorbike get hit by a car. You go over to check on them and they complain of neck pain.
Do not move them. Do not remove their helmet. Call 999.
(It is unsafe to move somebody with a suspected spinal injury.)

You notice some blood in your stool but feel fine.
Call your doctors surgery and ask for an urgent appointment, go to a walk-in or call 111.
(blood in stool can be a indicator of internal bleeding. If you are bleeding internally something is very wrong and you need to get it checked soon)

You have a large deep-ish cut from cutting veggies. It isn't bleeding heavily, but won't stop bleeding either.
Cover it with a bandage or clean fabric (like a tea towel), hold it above your chest and keep pressure on it.
Go to a walk-in or make an urgent appointment (say what the issue is).
Night time? Call 111 or go to A&E.
Nobody to drive you? Ask a neighbour or call 111.
(You may need stitches and cannot leave it too long as it might get infected. You need to be seen soon, but it is not an emergency. You shouldn't drive while bleeding as you may get dizzy or pass out and crash).

You are babysitting your little cousin. You notice a rash on them. They are acting distant and tired, but are still responsive.
Call 111 or go to A&E.
They stop responding? Call 999.
(they may be having an allergic reaction or have an illness like meningitis. They need to be seen urgently as they may become much worse in a short time).

You have a pain in your back. You were moving heavy boxes recently so it's most likely caused by that.
Pharmacy for painkiller advice.
Consider booking a normal GP appointment if it keeps up for a week or so.
(you have probably strained your back. It usually heals by itself, but may need a bit extra help if it lasts a long time).

You are feeling low. You are perfectly healthy, but are not enjoying life and sometimes get anxious, tearful or have dark thoughts.
Make an appointment to see your GP
(you may be depressed or suffering with another mh issue. Your doctor can help you)

Your friend recently told you that they suffer with depression. You are talking online and they seem down. The conversation is dark and concerns you. They randomly stop responding mid-coversation, which is unlike them.
Call them to check they are okay and why they stopped responding.
No answer? If you are nearby or know people who are, go check on them.
Not nearby or get no response? Call 999. They may be hurt and need medical help. It may be awkward if they went for a quick shower without saying, but you might also save their life.


Remember, if in doubt don't risk it. Go see somebody or call 111. If it was the wrong place it will be a little awkward, but it's not worth risking your health over some awkwardness.
This is a simple little prompt for appropriate places. Each case will be different though so please use common sense.


I hope this clears things up a bit for people. If you have anything to add or ask, please do. And remember you can always look things up on the NHS website.
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Tiger Rag
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(Original post by Kindred)
This is something that comes up a fair bit so I figured i'd do a quick infomercial on where you can go for various medical things. The NHS has a guide for this (http://www.nhs.uk/NHSEngland/AboutNH...SServices.aspx), but sometimes it's hard to work out what's an emergency or what's not serious so i'll add some examples I hear about often.
This is also a chance to ask about different scenarios or anything. Just bare in mind that I am not trained in this stuff bar basic first aid so do not know everything. It's always best to follow up with your own research for anything important.

Anyway, here's a list of different services on the NHS and when to use them:

Pharmacy- general queries for things like colds, heavy sweating, mild acne and other minor ailments. Also for advice on medications ("can I take X with Y?", "what's best for this type of pain?" etc). They can tell you if you need to see a doctor instead of them.

GP (normal appointment)- routine things that aren't urgent or time sensitive. Things like feeling generally unwell, snoring loudly at night, being tired often, feeling depressed, persistent aches and pains.

GP (urgent appointment)/ walk-in-relatively minor things that are time sensitive or urgent. Things like cuts, odd rashes, infections, sprains, severe pains (prevent yo from doing usual things/ aren't helped by painkillers), passing blood in stool/ urine or coughing up blood. This can also include things like suspicious lumps as they can be urgent.

A&E- Emergencies (immediate or very serious danger). Things like sever chest pain, serious breaks, concussion, passing out, difficulty breathing, heavy bleeding.
Also things that are too urgent for GP/ walk-in or need hospital equipment*. Severe pains at night, minor breaks/ fractures etc.
The accident part is silly- stubbing your toe is an accident, but you should not go to A&E for that.

*some places will have an urgent treatment centre which can be used for things like this- call 111 or look it up if you are unsure.

999- Super emergencies (a life is at risk). Things like strokes, heart attacks, allergic reactions, seizures, unconsciousness, suicide risks, neck injuries.
Also for when you cannot get to A&E yourself with things like heavy bleeding, chest pains, serious breaks. Remember, it is unsafe to drive yourself if you are unwell.

111- For if you are unsure. You can call them if you aren't sure where to go and they will ask some questions then tell you the most appropriate place. They can also book appointments with out of hours dentists and hospitals.
This can be useful for the blurred line between urgent and emergency or if you are unsure what a symptom indicates.
They take information so they can call an ambulance, call back if disconnected or add things to your records. You can ask to stay anon.
Things like feeling dizzy, unusual marks or discharges, dental pain out of hours, medicine side effects, litterally anything else. Also, if you have issues with transport etc- they can put you on with drs/ nurses or advise you.



Here are some examples of situations and where to go:

You are playing football in a field with friends. One friend takes a nasty fall and injures their leg. It looks broken.
Can they move to a car and be driven to A&E? If yes, do that.
Does it hurt too much to move them or look like their leg will be further injured if you try? If yes, call an ambulance.
(They need an xray. It is not an emergency, but is urgent. They need to be seen at a hospital soon. If you cannot move them you need to call somebody who can.)

You are walking home when you see somebody on a motorbike get hit by a car. You go over to check on them and they complain of neck pain.
Do not move them. Do not remove their helmet. Call 999.
(It is unsafe to move somebody with a suspected spinal injury.)

You notice some blood in your stool but feel fine.
Call your doctors surgery and ask for an urgent appointment, go to a walk-in or call 111.
(blood in stool can be a indicator of internal bleeding. If you are bleeding internally something is very wrong and you need to get it checked soon)

You have a large deep-ish cut from cutting veggies. It isn't bleeding heavily, but won't stop bleeding either.
Cover it with a bandage or clean fabric (like a tea towel), hold it above your chest and keep pressure on it.
Go to a walk-in or make an urgent appointment (say what the issue is).
Night time? Call 111 or go to A&E.
Nobody to drive you? Ask a neighbour or call 111.
(You may need stitches and cannot leave it too long as it might get infected. You need to be seen soon, but it is not an emergency. You shouldn't drive while bleeding as you may get dizzy or pass out and crash).

You are babysitting your little cousin. You notice a rash on them. They are acting distant and tired, but are still responsive.
Call 111 or go to A&E.
They stop responding? Call 999.
(they may be having an allergic reaction or have an illness like meningitis. They need to be seen urgently as they may become much worse in a short time).

You have a pain in your back. You were moving heavy boxes recently so it's most likely caused by that.
Pharmacy for painkiller advice.
Consider booking a normal GP appointment if it keeps up for a week or so.
(you have probably strained your back. It usually heals by itself, but may need a bit extra help if it lasts a long time).

You are feeling low. You are perfectly healthy, but are not enjoying life and sometimes get anxious, tearful or have dark thoughts.
Make an appointment to see your GP
(you may be depressed or suffering with another mh issue. Your doctor can help you)

Your friend recently told you that they suffer with depression. You are talking online and they seem down. The conversation is dark and concerns you. They randomly stop responding mid-coversation, which is unlike them.
Call them to check they are okay and why they stopped responding.
No answer? If you are nearby or know people who are, go check on them.
Not nearby or get no response? Call 999. They may be hurt and need medical help. It may be awkward if they went for a quick shower without saying, but you might also save their life.


Remember, if in doubt don't risk it. Go see somebody or call 111. If it was the wrong place it will be a little awkward, but it's not worth risking your health over some awkwardness.
This is a simple little prompt for appropriate places. Each case will be different though so please use common sense.


I hope this clears things up a bit for people. If you have anything to add or ask, please do. And remember you can always look things up on the NHS website.
This is useful thanks.

I managed to hit my head earlier this year but felt okish. (it hurt; but I was otherwise ok, aside from some grazes) I was really unsure what to do - sounded like overkill for A&E. (yes, it was an accident; but it wasn't exactly an emergency) Unfortunately for me, I had to walk past minor injuries which was shut. I went home, cleaned myself up, text my mum to see what I should do (I didn't get an answer - she was working nights) and then walked back up to minor injuries.

I explained why i was there, that I was felt sore; but otherwise ok and wasn't sure whether I should really be there. It was explained to me when you go to A&E with head injuries (if you vomit or you're unconscious, basically) and that if he was me, he would have turned up to minor injuries too.

Someone else did tell me about 111 which I really didn't think about at the time and didn't think GP was overly appropriate, given that I'd injured myself.
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Kindred
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(Original post by Tiger Rag)
This is useful thanks.

I managed to hit my head earlier this year but felt okish. (it hurt; but I was otherwise ok, aside from some grazes) I was really unsure what to do - sounded like overkill for A&E. (yes, it was an accident; but it wasn't exactly an emergency) Unfortunately for me, I had to walk past minor injuries which was shut. I went home, cleaned myself up, text my mum to see what I should do (I didn't get an answer - she was working nights) and then walked back up to minor injuries.

I explained why i was there, that I was felt sore; but otherwise ok and wasn't sure whether I should really be there. It was explained to me when you go to A&E with head injuries (if you vomit or you're unconscious, basically) and that if he was me, he would have turned up to minor injuries too.

Someone else did tell me about 111 which I really didn't think about at the time and didn't think GP was overly appropriate, given that I'd injured myself.
Glad you're okay now. It can be pretty difficult sometimes to sort what is and isn't an emergency or urgent or whatever. It's why I'm so grateful for 111. It seems so useless until you have one of those unsure moments.
I've had my fair share of issues including some question moments either cos I didn't know what I was dealing with or other places were shut. I'm damn glad I had 111 for that. I never really used 111 much until I was at uni and registered with a GP at home. I get infections and what not a fair amount so 111 and walk-ins became my lifeline. It seems the sort of thing not too many people know about or remember to use in confusing times.

Anyway, glad you found this useful and thanks for sharing
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Dameskorpion
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Thank you for sharing
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